Military history

The American Civil War and the Wars of the Industrial Revolution

The American Civil War and the Wars of the Industrial Revolution

Hailed as the most compelling biography of the German dictator yet written, Ian Kershaw's Hitler brings us closer than ever before to the heart of its subject's immense darkness.

The Civil War was the bloodiest in America's history, comprising 149 engagements of importance and 2200 skirmishes. The author narrates the history of the war and also describes how such factors as generalship, staff work, organization, intelligence and logistics affect the shape and decisions of the battlefield. He looks at the strengths, and weaknesses of the opposing sides - the North's industrial strength and the South's material shortages, for example - and the effect of new weapons on tactics. He explores the crucial role of the industrial revolution on the course of 19th-century warfare, first in the Crimean War, then in Prussia's wars with Austria and France, and most dramatically in the American Civil War.

INTRODUCTION

Chapter 1: North and South Divide

Chapter 2: Will There Be a War?

Chapter 3: Improvised Armies

Chapter 4: Running the War

Chapter 5: The Military Geography of the Civil War

Chapter 6: The Life of the Soldier

Chapter 7: Plans

Chapter 8: McClellan Takes Command

Chapter 9: The War in Middle America

Chapter 10: Lee’s War in the East, Grant’s War in the West

Chapter 11: Chancellorsville and Gettysburg

Chapter 12: Vicksburg

Chapter 13: Cutting the Chattanooga—Atlanta Link

Chapter 14: The Overland Campaign and the Fall of Richmond

Chapter 15: Breaking into the South

Chapter 16: The Battle off Cherbourg and the Civil War at Sea

Chapter 17: Black Soldiers

Chapter 18: The Home Fronts

Chapter 19: Walt Whitman and Wounds

Chapter 20: Civil War Generalship

Chapter 21: Civil War Battle

Chapter 22: Could the South Have Survived?

Chapter 23: The End of the War

NOTES

BIBLIOGRAPHY

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS