Military history

Bannockburn 1314: Robert Bruce's great victory

Bannockburn 1314: Robert Bruce's great victory

Osprey's study of the Battle of Bannockburn, which was part of the First War of Scottish Independence (1296-1328) and the climax of the career of King Robert the Bruce. In 1307 King Edward I of England, 'The Hammer of the Scots' and nemesis of William Wallace, died and his son, Edward II, was not from the same mould. Idle and apathetic, he allowed the Scots the chance to recover from the grievous punishment inflicted upon them. By 1314 Bruce had captured every major English-held castle bar Stirling and Edward II took an army north to subdue the Scots. Pete Armstrong's account of this pivotal campaign culminates at the decisive battle of Bannockburn that finally won Scotland her independence.

ORIGINS OF THE CAMPAIGN

Chapter 1: Robert Bruce Recovers his Kingdom, 1307–1314

CHRONOLOGY

OPPOSING COMMANDERS

Chapter 2: The English Commanders

Chapter 3: The Scottish Commanders

OPPOSING ARMIES

Chapter 4: The English Army of 1314

Chapter 5: The Scottish Army of 1314

OPPOSING PLANS

Chapter 6: English Plans • Scottish Plans

THE CAMPAIGN

Chapter 7: The Siege of Stirling Castle

Chapter 8: Edward II marches North, 17–22 June 1314

ORDERS OF BATTLE

Chapter 9: The English Army • The Scottish Army

THE BATTLE OF BANNOCKBURN

Chapter 10: Sunday 23 June 1314 – First Moves

Chapter 11: The Site of the Battle

Chapter 12: Dawn, Monday 24 June 1314

Chapter 13: Midmorning – The English defeated

AFTERMATH

Chapter 14: The Reckoning – captives and casualties

Chapter 15: Reasons for the English defeat

Chapter 16: Results of the Battle – The long war continues 1314–28

Chapter 17: Military Tactics after Bannockburn

APPENDIX

Effigies, tombs and monuments of those who fought at Bannockburn

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY