Modern history

The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

During the fateful quarter century leading up to World War I, the climax of a century of rapid, unprecedented change, a privileged few enjoyed Olympian luxury as the underclass was “heaving in its pain, its power, and its hate.” In The Proud Tower, Barbara W. Tuchman brings the era to vivid life: the decline of the Edwardian aristocracy; the Anarchists of Europe and America; Germany and its self-depicted hero, Richard Strauss; Diaghilev’s Russian ballet and Stravinsky’s music; the Dreyfus Affair; the Peace Conferences in The Hague; and the enthusiasm and tragedy of Socialism, epitomized by the assassination of Jean Jaurès on the night the Great War began and an epoch came to a close.

Foreword

Chapter 1. The Patricians: ENGLAND: 1895–1902

Chapter 2. The Idea and the Deed: THE ANARCHISTS: 1890–1914

Chapter 3. End of a Dream: THE UNITED STATES: 1890–1902

Chapter 4. “Give Me Combat!”: FRANCE: 1894–99

Chapter 5. The Steady Drummer: THE HAGUE: 1899 AND 1907

Chapter 6. “Neroism Is in the Air”: GERMANY: 1890–1914

Chapter 7. Transfer of Power: ENGLAND: 1902–11

Chapter 8. The Death of Jaurès: THE SOCIALISTS: 1890–1914

Afterword

References