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The Lost Battles: Leonardo, Michelangelo and the Artistic Duel That Defined the Renaissance

The Lost Battles: Leonardo, Michelangelo and the Artistic Duel That Defined the Renaissance

In 1504, the informal rivalry between two of the most celebrated artists in Florence became a direct competition. Michelangelo was commissioned to paint a scene from the ancient battle of Cascina on a wall of the Palazzo Vecchio—in the same room where Leonardo da Vinci had already been commissioned to paint a scene from another great Florentine victory, the battle of Anghiari. As the paintings progressed, Michelangelo set out to prove that his work, not Leonardo’s, embodied the future of art. In fact, the influence of both is visible in the works of subsequent generations of artists.
 
Historian and art critic Jonathan Jones offers a riveting exploration of this great rivalry, which would become a turning point in the careers of both men, and brings to life an era of fascinating political and cultural transformation.

Introduction

PART ONE - Genius in the Streets, 1503–4

Chapter 1. The Insult

Chapter 2. The Fame Machine

Chapter 3. Heroics

Chapter 4. Stoning David

Chapter 5. The Ascent of Art

PART TWO - The Art of War, 1504–5

Chapter 6. Bloodstains

Chapter 7. The Genius in His Study

Chapter 8. Naked Truth

Chapter 9. Master of War

Chapter 10. The Raid

Chapter 11. The Great Swan

Chapter 12. Hell’s Mouth

PART THREE - The Lost Battles, 1506–Present

Chapter 13. The Good Citizen

Chapter 14. School of the World

Chapter 15. Prisoners

Color Photo Insert

NOTES

BIBLIOGRAPHY

APPENDIX: THE WORKS OF ART