Biographies & Memoirs

You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train: A Personal History of Our Times

You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train: A Personal History of Our Times

A former bombardier in WWII, Zinn emerged in the civil rights movement as a powerful voice for justice. Although he's a fierce critic, he gives us reason to hope that by learning from history and engaging politically, we can make a difference in the world.

Introduction: The Question Period in Kalamazoo

PART ONE: The South and the Movement

Chapter 1: Going South: Spelman College

Chapter 2: “Young Ladies Who Can Picket”

Chapter 3: “A President Is Like a Gardener”

Chapter 4: “My Name Is Freedom”: Albany, Georgia

Chapter 5: Selma, Alabama

Chapter 6: “I’ll Be Here”: Mississippi

PART TWO: War

Chapter 7: A Veteran against War

Chapter 8: “Sometimes to Be Silent Is to Lie”: Vietnam

Chapter 9: The Last Teach-In

Chapter 10: “Our Apologies, Good Friends, for the Fracture of Good Order”

PART THREE: Scenes and Changes

Chapter 11: In Jail: “The World Is Topsy-Turvy”

Chapter 12: In Court: “The Heart of the Matter”

Chapter 13: Growing Up Class-Conscious

Chapter 14: A Yellow Rubber Chicken: Battles at Boston University

Chapter 15: The Possibility of Hope