Biographies & Memoirs

NOTES

Prologue

1. Erik Hedegaard, “The Last Confessions of E. Howard Hunt,” Rolling Stone, April 5, 2007.

2. This entire section was based on a collection of notes over a period of nearly twenty years that I began writing in the early 1970s. As a training clinical psychologist, it was part of my orientation to begin an intensive period of personal psychotherapy that lasted a number of years. All of the vivid recollections in this chapter were based on memories that had been elicited, and noted, in various psychotherapeutic encounters.

3. In the fall of 1966, New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison reopened his investigation into the Kennedy assassination, after having made the mistake of turning over his earlier investigation to the FBI, which did nothing. Within days after Dallas, Garrison had arrested David Ferrie as a possible associate of Lee Harvey Oswald’s. Further convinced that Oswald could never have acted alone, Garrison soon widened his net to include Guy Banister and Clay Shaw.

In March 1967, Garrison arrested Clay Shaw for conspiring to assassinate President Kennedy. Shaw’s trial would not begin until January 1969, but in the spring of 1968, after having been undermined by Life magazine, Garrison visited with Look magazine’s managing editor, William (“Bill”) Attwood, who had been a Princeton classmate of my father’s. Garrison, according to author Joan Mellen, “outlined his investigation through lunch, dinner, and into the night.” Attwood became so impressed with what Garrison had discovered that he called his friend Bobby Kennedy “at one in the morning.” Look was prepared to do a major feature story on the Garrison investigation, but Attwood unexpectedly suffered a significant heart attack, and the article never materialized. See Joan Mellen, A Farewell to Justice (Dulles, Va.: Potomac Books, 2005), p. 259.

Introduction

1. David S. Lifton, Best Evidence: Disguise and Deception in the Assassination of John F. Kennedy (New York: Dell, 1982). See also Douglas P. Horne, Inside the Assassination Records Review Board: The U.S. Government’s Final Attempt to Reconcile the Conflicting Medical Evidence in the Assassination of JFK., 5 vols. (printed by author, 2009).

2. Joan Mellen, A Farewell to Justice (Dulles, Va.: Potomac Books, 2005), pp. 383–384. Mellen further discussed and confirmed this event in an interview by this author on November 19, 2006.

3. Gaeton Fonzi, The Last Investigation (New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press, 1993), p. 31; Gaeton Fonzi, interview by the author, February 24, 2010.

4. David Talbot, Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years (New York: Free Press, 2007), p. 381. See also, Anthony Summers, Conspiracy (New York: Paragon House, 1989), pp. 143–149. That Lee Harvey Oswald was part of a 1959 false defection program administered through the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) in Nags Head, North Carolina, was first discussed in an interview that Summers conducted with former CIA officer Victor Marchetti, who later confirmed this account in an interview by this author on October 4, 2007. According to author Joan Mellen, the ONI program was overseen by the CIA’s counterintelligence chief, James Jesus Angleton. Upon Oswald’s return to the U.S. in 1962, he was, in fact, “debriefed” by a CIA officer named Aldrin (“Andy”) Anderson. The debriefing report was read by CIA officer Donald Deneselya, who confirmed this in an interview for this book on May 25, 2007, as well as in the 1993 PBS Frontline program, “Who Was Lee Harvey Oswald?”

5. Ibid. David Talbot, Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years (New York: Free Press, 2007), p. 381.

6. L. Fletcher Prouty, JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy (New York: Citadel, 1996), p. 81.

7. Ibid., p. xxii.

8. Martin Duberman, Waiting to Land: A (Mostly) Political Memoir, 1985–2008 (New York: New Press, 2009), p. 288.

9. David Brooks, “Bookshorts: Kennedy’s Big Mess; Savitch’s Sad Life,” Wall Street Journal, August 16, 1988, p. 26.

10. Gale Reference Team, “Biography: Damore, Leo J. (1929–1995),” Contemporary Authors (Farmington Hills, Mich.: Thompson Gale, 2004).

11. Francis I. Broadhurst, “A Refreshing View of Kennedy,” Cape Cod Times, November 18, 1993.

12. Letter from Seymour Hersh to Mark O’Blazney, November 1, 1995.

13. Ibid.

14. James H. Smith, Esq. interview by the author, April 6, 2004. Smith recounted verbatim the conversation with his friend John H. Davis.

Chapter 1. Fate’s Engagement

1. Mary Pinchot, “Requiem,” New York Times, January 25, 1940, p. 16. The poem was a tribute to her half-sister Rosamond Pinchot, who committed suicide in 1938.

2. The nature of Mary Meyer’s involvement with President Kennedy and their mutual concern with world peace initiatives, away from the Cold War, is the focus of this book and will be demonstrated throughout. Significant support for this perspective came from former presidential adviser Kenneth P. O’Donnell’s extensive interviews with the late author Leo Damore, shortly before O’Donnell’s death, as well as other sources and interviews with Damore. The most recent account of Mary Meyer’s influence in the Kennedy White House was provided by David Talbot in his book Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years (New York: Free Press, 2007).

3. James McConnell Truitt, letter to author Deborah Davis, dated May 11, 1979. The letter was part of the files of the late author Leo Damore, and was confirmed by author Deborah Davis in 2005.

4. Mary Meyer’s intention to go public with her revelations about the CIA’s involvement in the Kennedy assassination has been documented in a number of sources. It was revealed, according to author Leo Damore, in Mary’s real diary, which Damore finally obtained and described in detail to his attorney, James H. Smith, Esq., on March 31, 1993 (see Appendix 3). Mary Meyer’s awareness of CIA involvement in the Kennedy assassination is also alluded to by Robert Morrow in his book First Hand Knowledge: How I Participated in the CIA-Mafia Murder of President Kennedy (New York: S.P.I. Books, 1992), 275–280, and in two transcripts of alleged conversations between CIA covert action specialist Robert T. Crowley and author Gregory Douglas on January 27, 1996, and April 2, 1996. The mutually reinforcing effect of these sources, and the way in which they aggregate, establish Mary Meyer’s intention to go public (after the Warren Report’s release in September) with all that she had discovered throughout the year of 1964, are discussed in greater detail in chapters 11, 12, and 13 and the Epilogue.

5. Leslie Judd Ahlander, “Frederick Drawings Exhibited,” Washington Post, November 24, 1963, p. G10.

6. Leo Damore, interview by the author, Centerbrook, Conn., February 1992. Between 1992 and 1994, there were at least five face-to-face meetings between Damore and this author, in addition to numerous follow-up telephone conversations regarding the life of Mary Meyer, her death, and Damore’s research. Damore stated that Mary Meyer had sought out Bill Walton’s counsel in early 1964.

7. See note 4 above. Leo Damore, who had acquired a copy of Mary Meyer’s real diary, told his attorney, James E. Smith, on March 31, 1993, that Mary had made a decision to go public with what she had discovered, sometime after the Warren Report had been released. See Appendix 3. Chapters 11, 12, and 13 also cover this arena thoroughly.

8. Ron Rosenbaum and Phillip Nobile, “The Curious Aftermath of JFK’s Best and Brightest Affair,” New Times, July 9, 1976, p. 29. “Mary Meyer was accustomed to leaving her diary in the bookcase in her bedroom where, incidentally, she kept clippings of the JFK assassination.” In 1976, the authors interviewed some of the people closest to Mary Meyer who had intimate knowledge of her habits during the last year of her life. In addition, according to Leo Damore, Mary also talked with presidential adviser Kenneth P. O’Donnell shortly after the Kennedy assassination. See note 2 above.

9. Nina Burleigh, A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), p. 304.

10. Anne and James Truitt had moved to Tokyo shortly after Anne’s sculpture exhibit Black, White, and Grey opened in January 1964 at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut. Her husband, James, was Japan’s bureau chief for Newsweek.

11. Morrow, First Hand Knowledge, p. 277. As noted in note 4 above, this event was also mentioned by former CIA official Robert T. Crowley in a conversation to author Gregory Douglas in January 1996. See Chapter 13 for further discussion of the way in which these sources are mutually corroborating.

12. Leo Damore revealed Mary Meyer’s altercation with Cord Meyer to his attorney, James H. Smith, Esq., during the above-referenced telephone call of March 31, 1993. Smith took six pages of notes on this call, which are reproduced in Appendix 3.

13. Confidential source who asked to remain anonymous, interview with the author, Washington, D.C., March 10, 2006.

14. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 22.

15. I am indebted to award-winning Boston fine artist Shelah Horvitz for her insightful analysis of some of the last paintings of Mary Pinchot Meyer, as well as Horvitz’s overall knowledge of the Washington Color School artists.

16. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 22. Part of this description was based on the authors’ interviews with principals in 1976, as well as the clothing Mary Meyer wore that day, which was documented in the trial transcript, United States of America v. Ray Crump, Jr., Defendant, Criminal Case No. 930-64, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C., July 20, 1965. Volume 1: pp. 4-7.

17. Burton Hersh, The American Elite and the Origins of the CIA (New York: Scribner, 1992), p. 439.

18. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 11.

19. Damore, interview.

20. Ibid. According to Damore, Kenny O’Donnell had shared with him that Mary Meyer had pushed hard for President Kennedy to protect the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal towpath area.

21. Herbert S. Parmet, JFK: The Presidency of John F. Kennedy (New York: Dial, 1983), p. 306. In addition, Leo Damore said he had interviewed Mr. Parmet, who gave him a number of other details about what he had learned about Jack’s relationship with Mary Meyer.

22. Bernie Ward and Granville Toogood, “Former Vice President of Washington Post Reveals JFK 2-Year White House Romance,” National Enquirer, March 2, 1976, p. 4. In addition, Leo Damore had interviewed an anonymous source who was a close friend of Mary Meyer’s who gave him more details about this encounter, which he discussed with me in 1992.

23. Ibid. Ward and Toogood, National Enquirer, March 2, 1976, p. 4. Damore interview with anonymous source, as with me in 1992.

24. The extent of John F. Kennedy’s difficulty with emotional intimacy, particularly with women, has been well documented in the following: Nigel Hamilton, JFK: Reckless Youth (New York: Random House, 1992), and two books by Ralph G. Martin: A Hero for Our Time: An Intimate Story of the Kennedy Years (New York: Macmillan, 1983) and Seeds of Destruction: Joe Kennedy and His Sons (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1995). In addition, presidential historian Robert Dallek’s An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917–1963 (Boston: Little, Brown, 2003) further documents this arena thoroughly, as does Doris Kearns Goodwin’s The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys (New York: St. Martin’s, 1987). All five volumes address John Kennedy’s emotional maternal deprivation and the toll it took on him. President Kennedy’s sexual addiction and reckless philandering is further documented by Seymour Hersh’s The Dark Side of Camelot (New York: Back Bay Books, 1997). See also chapter 6 for further discussion.

25. Anne Truitt, Daybook: The Journal of an Artist (New York: Pantheon, 1982), p. 165.

26. Parmet, JFK, p. 306.

27. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 226.

28. See Chapter 8. Mary Meyer’s initial foray into psychedelics, according to James Truitt, appears to have taken place in the San Francisco Bay area during a late-1950s visit with Jim Truitt and his wife, Anne. Deborah Davis, interview by Leo Damore, February 23, 1991; Deborah Davis, interview by the author, March 17, 2009. During Davis’s research for her book Katharine the Great in 1976, she traveled to Mexico to interview Jim Truitt for more than ten hours over a three-day period. The two then corresponded further by mail. Nina Burleigh also references the likelihood of Jim Truitt’s influence for “Mary’s initiation into drug experimentation.” See Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, pp. 171–172).

29. During his never-before-published two-hour interview by Leo Damore on November 7, 1990, Timothy Leary commented extensively on Mary Meyer’s experience with psychedelics and the impact it had on her worldview and in her life. Timothy Leary, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., November 7, 1990. See also Chapters 8 and 9.

30. Timothy Leary, Flashbacks: An Autobiography (Los Angeles: J. P. Tarcher, 1983), p. 129. Also, during his 1990 interview with Leo Damore, Leary spoke at some length about how Mary Meyer defined her mission with psychedelics. See chapter 9.

31. Leary, interview. See also Leary, Flashbacks, p. 156.

32. Ward and Toogood, “White House Romance,” p. 4; Damore, interview. Damore repeatedly stressed that Mary Meyer had been in large measure “a healer” in Kennedy’s tortured emotional life. Some of Damore’s insight had been based on his talks with Kenny O’Donnell regarding Mary Meyer’s influence on the president.

33. Leary, Flashbacks, p. 191.

34. Ibid., p. 162. In addition, since the first edition (1979) of Deborah Davis’s Katharine the Great (which was recalled and shredded due to pressure from Ben Bradlee and Katharine Graham), there has been controversy over whether Phil Graham actually mentioned during his infamous “meltdown” in Phoenix at a newspaper convention in January 1963 the fact that Mary Meyer was having an affair with President Kennedy. Carol Felsenthal, whose 1993 book Power, Privilege and the Post was thoroughly checked and vetted, maintains that Phil Graham did, in fact, reveal the affair during his drunken tirade. In an interview for this book, Ms. Felsenthal stated the following: “Because of what happened to the Deborah Davis book, my book was vetted and re-vetted. I would never have been able to get away with something that wasn’t thoroughly checked.” In addition, Felsenthal also revealed that Ben Bradlee “told a journalism class at USC that he had read every entry [in the Felsenthal book] and he thought it was fair.” Carol Felsenthal, interview by the author, August 10, 2010.

35. In an interview Nina Burleigh conducted with CIA wife Joanne (“Joan”) Bross, Ms. Bross stated that James Angleton bragged on more than one occasion that he had wiretapped Mary Meyer’s telephone and bugged her bedroom. See Burleigh, A Very Private Woman 18, pp. 124–125. In addition, during Leo Damore’s above-mentioned telephone call to his attorney, James H. Smith, Esq., on March 31, 1993, Damore said that he had just talked for several hours with “William L. Mitchell,” who confessed to being part of a surveillance team assigned to Mary Meyer around the time of the Warren Report’s release to the public in September 1964.

36. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 29.

37. The description of the final seconds of Mary Meyer’s life and what occurred at the scene of her death was outlined in detail in prosecuting attorney Alfred Hantman’s fifteen-page opening statement at the trial of Ray Crump, Jr. in July 1965. See trial transcript, United States of America v. Ray Crump, Jr., Defendant, Criminal Case No. 930-64, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C., July 20, 1965, Vol. l: pp. 2–17.

38. According to the 1965 trial testimony of Dr. Linwood Rayford, the deputy coroner, the second shot was placed over Mary Meyer’s right shoulder blade, “angling from right to left and slightly downward,” where its trajectory would traverse the chest cavity, “perforating the right lung and the aorta …” Trial transcript, pp. 71–72. In 1991, Dr. Rayford told Leo Damore that “whoever assaulted this woman intended to kill her.” Dr. Linwood L. Rayford, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., February 19, 1991.

Chapter 2. Murder on the Towpath

1. Henry Wiggins Jr., interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., April 2, 1992.

2. Trial transcript, United States of America v. Ray Crump, Jr., Defendant, Criminal Case No. 930-64, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C., July 20. 1965, pp. 132–133, 293.

3. Ibid., p. 240–241.

4. Ibid., p. 240–241, p. 246.

5. Ibid., pp. 133–137; Henry Wiggins Jr., interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., April 2, 1992.

6. Trial transcript, pp. 262, p. 264.

7. Ibid., p. 218.

8. Ibid., p. 240, p. 248.

9. Ibid., p. 343; p. 345.

10. Ibid., p. 352; Roderick Sylvis, interview by the author, Wake Forest, North Carolina, July 23, 2008.

11. Trial transcript, p. 354.

12. Ibid., pp. 348–349.

13. Wiggins interview.

14. Trial transcript, p. 452.

15. Rosenbaum, Ron and Phillip Nobile, “The Curious Aftermath of JFK’s Best and Brightest Affair,” New Times, July 9, 1976, p. 24.

16. Trial transcript, pp. 232–265. Henry Wiggins reiterated his account several times throughout the trial.

17. Ibid., p. 359.

18. Ibid., p. 361.

19. Ibid., p. 381.

20. Ibid., p. 370.

21. Ibid., p. 407, p. 413. Byers told prosecuting attorney Alfred Hantman that it had been “[a]bout 1:00 o’clock or a little after” when he got the radio request to look for the jacket and cap (407). Under cross-examination by defense attorney Dovey Roundtree, he reiterated that it was “approximately 1:00 o’clock” when he received his instructions to look for the jacket (p. 413).

22. Ibid., p. 419.

23. Ibid., p. 67.

24. Ibid., p. 710.

25. Ibid., p. 254.

26. Unnamed colleague of Detective Bernard Crooke, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., October 28, 1990.

27. Ibid.

28. Rosenbaum and Nobile., “Curious Aftermath,” p. 24.

29. Wiggins, interview.

30. Ibid.

31. Ibid.

32. Ibid.

33. Ibid.

34. Ibid.

35. Trial transcript, pp. 455–456.

36. Ibid., p. 634.

37. George Peter Lamb, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., December 20, 1990.

38. Ibid.

39. Ibid.

40. Ibid.

41. Ibid.

42. “Laborer Is Charged in Slaying of Artist; Mrs. Meyer Shot to Death on Towpath,” Evening Star, October 13, 1964, p. B-1.

43. Ibid.

44. Ibid.

45. Dr. Linwood L. Rayford, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., February 19, 1991.

46. Ibid.

47. Trial transcript, pp. 71–75.

48. Ibid., pp. 71–72.

49. Ibid., pp. 71–75.

50. Rayford, interview.

51. Although Detective Edwin Coppage testified at the trial that the gloves were removed at the murder scene by Detective Bernie Crooke, Dr. Rayford testified that he remembered the victim had been wearing the gloves at the murder scene. Trial transcript, p. 67, p. 79, p. 81, p. 90, p. 669. Crooke had already left the murder scene with Ray Crump before Rayford arrived at approximately 2:00 P.M. Rayford, interview. Rayford specifically remembered that the gloves were removed at the autopsy and given to Crooke after 3:45 P.M on the day of the murder.

52. Dovey Roundtree, interviews by Leo Damore, 1990–1993. During these interviews, Dovey Roundtree shared numerous documents relating to her defense of Ray Crump, including the account given to her by Robert Woolright the morning he came to pick up Crump for work.

53. Ibid. In a discussion with Leo Damore regarding the testimony of Elsie Perkins, Dovey Roundtree mentioned that Crump’s jacket had been a Father’s Day present given to him by his wife, Helena, and their children the preceding June. See also the testimony of Elsie Perkins, trial transcript, pp. 485–507.

54. Trial transcript, p. 468, pp. 485–507.

55. Ibid., p. 486.

56. Ibid., pp. 467–505. Also, Dovey Roundtree told Leo Damore during several interviews that no one in Ray Crump’s family, church community, or anyone she interviewed ever recalled Ray Crump with a firearm of any kind. Ray’s brother, Jimmy Crump, had at one time years earlier owned a.22-caliber rifle, but that was the extent of any firearm noted in Crump’s immediate and extended family.

57. Trial transcript, pp. 43–47.

58. “Woman Shot Dead on Tow Path,” Evening Star, Washington, D.C., October 12, 1964, p. A-1.

59. Alfred E. Lewis and Richard Corrigan, “Suspect Seized in Canal Slaying; Woman Dies in Robbery on Towpath,” Washington Post, October 13, 1964, p. A-1.

60. “Laborer Is Charged,” p. A-1.

61. Ben A. Franklin, “Woman Painter Shot and Killed on Canal Towpath in Capital,” New York Times, October 14, 1964.

62. Trial transcript, pp. 438–449.

63. Report of the FBI Laboratory, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D.C., October 16, 1964, addressed to Mr. Robert V. Murray, Chief, Metropolitan Police Department, Washington, D.C., DB 72000, HO.64.2623, pp. 1–4. See Appendix 1.

64. “Rape Weighed as Motive in Death of Mrs. Meyer,” Evening Star, October 14, 1964, Metro sec., p. B-1.

65. “Meyer Slaying—Police Have ‘Mystery’ Witness,” Washington Daily News, October 14, 1964.

Chapter 3. Conspiracy to Conceal

1. Leo Damore, interview by the author, Centerbrook, Conn., February 1992. During this interview, Damore revealed many of the details that Kenneth O’Donnell had shared with him about what had taken place between Mary Meyer and President Kennedy during the dedication of the Pinchot Institute for Conservation at Grey Towers on September 24, 1963.

2. Nina Burleigh, A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), pp. 16–25.

3. Alfred E. Lewis and Richard Corrigan, “Suspect Seized in Canal Slaying; Woman Dies in Robbery on Towpath,” Washington Post, October 13, 1964, p. A-1.

4. Susan Fletcher Witzell, “Gardeners and Caretakers of Woods Hole,” Spritsail: A Journal of the History of Falmouth and Vicinity (Woods Hole, Mass.: Woods Hole Historical Collection) 19, no. 2 (Summer 2005): p. 31.

5. Bishop Paul Moore, interview by Leo Damore, February 5, 1991.

6. Ibid.

7. “Bishop at Meyer Rites Asks Prayer for Killer,” Evening Star, October 15, 1964, p. B2.

8. Ibid.

9. Moore, interview.

10. Joseph J. Trento, The Secret History of the CIA (Roseville, Calif.: Prima, 2001), p. 282.

11. Moore, interview.

12.  Bernie Ward and Granville Toogood, “Former Vice President of Washington Post Reveals JFK 2-Year White House Romance,” National Enquirer, March 2, 1976, p. 4.

13. Ron Rosenbaum and Phillip Nobile, “The Curious Aftermath of JFK’s Best and Brightest Affair,” New Times, July 9, 1976, p. 33.

14. Ibid., p. 22.

15. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 244.

16. Ben Bradlee, A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995), 266.

17. Trial transcript, United States of America v. Ray Crump, Jr., Defendant, Criminal Case No. 930-64, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C., July 20. 1965, p. 43.

18. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 32.

19. Bradlee, Good Life, 266; Ben Bradlee, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., January 31, 2007.

20. Testimony of Ben Bradlee, trial transcript, p. 43.

21. Bradlee, Good Life, pp. 266–267.

22. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 33.

23. Ibid., p. 32.

24. Ibid., p. 29.

25. Ibid.

26. James DiEugenio, “The Posthumous Assassination of John F. Kennedy,” in The Assassinations: Probe Magazine on JFK, MLK, RFK, and Malcolm X, ed. James DiEugenio and Lisa Pease (Los Angeles: Feral House, 2003), pp. 339–345.

27. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 29.

28. Ward and Toogood, “White House Romance,” p. 4.

29. Bradlee, Good Life, p. 267.

30. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 32.

31. Trial transcript, pp. 46–47.

32. Cicely D’Autremont Angleton and Anne Truitt, “In Angleton’s Custody,” letter to the editor, New York Times Book Review, November 5, 1995.

33. Ibid. This was further confirmed by the account that Tony Bradlee gave to author Sally Bedell Smith. See: Sally Bedell Smith, Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House (New York: Random House, 2004), p. 286.

34. William Safire, “Editor’s Notes,” New York Times, October 1, 1995.

35. Tom Mangold, Cold Warrior: James Jesus Angleton; The CIA’s Master Spy Hunter (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1991), pp. 327–330; Trento, Secret History, pp. 410–411; Newton “Scotty” Miler, interview by the author, February 15, 2005. All three of these sources attest to the fact that Angleton kept a voluminous set of files in a number of different safes at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. Scotty Miler became Angleton’s chief of operations and was part of Angleton’s elite unit known as the Special Investigations Group (CI/SIG). He mentioned several times that Angleton never destroyed any file or document. “He kept everything,” said Miler.

36. Adam Bernstein, “Antoinette Pinchot Bradlee, Former Wife of Prominent Washington Post Executive Editor Benjamin C. Bradlee, Dies at 87,” Washington Post, November 14, 2011.

37. Letter to the editor, “The Angleton Children Tell Their Side,” Washington Post, December 2, 2011.

38. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 33.

39. Sally Bedell Smith, Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House (New York: Random House, 2004), p. 286. Also, in an email to this author on July 27, 2010, author Sally Bedell Smith said she had conducted an extensive interview with Tony Bradlee in January 2001 and a follow-up in September 2001.

40. Ibid. According to author Sally Bedell Smith, “After James Truitt’s interviews with the National Enquirer, Tony decided to destroy the diary. She called Anne Truitt (by then divorced from James), who lived across the street in Washington, and they watched the notebook burn in Tony’s fireplace.” p. 286.

41. Bradlee, interview.

42. Bradlee, Good Life, pp. 269-270.

43. Ibid., p. 268.

44. Bradlee, interview.

45. Sally Bedell Smith, Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House (New York: Random House, 2004), p. 286.

46. Ibid.

47. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 33.

48. Smith, Grace and Power, p. 286.

49. Timothy Leary, Flashbacks: An Autobiography (Los Angeles: J. P. Tarcher, 1983), p. 194.

50. Nancy Pittman Pinchot, interview by the author, November 18, 2009. According to Ms. Pinchot, a niece of Mary Meyer’s, this diary still exists somewhere in Milford, Pennsylvania. It contained an account of Mary’s struggle with her father Amos’s deteriorating mental condition, subsequent to his daughter Rosamund’s suicide, as well as at least one other relationship with a man Mary Meyer was involved with at the time, in addition to William Attwood. This particular diary was also read and referenced by Bibi Gaston in The Loveliest Woman in America (New York: William Morrow, 2008). Because of the nature of my book, the Meyer-Pinchot family denied me access to this earlier diary of Mary Meyer’s.

51. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 29.

52. Evelyn Patterson Truitt, letter to Anthony Summers, March 10, 1983. The letter was shared with this author by Anthony Summers.

53. Jefferson Morley, Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2008). pp. 277-283. In addition, U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Thomas Mann told author Dick Russell that he “always suspected that he [Win Scott] might have been murdered … When you get involved in that sort of thing [the CIA and the world of intelligence], one is not surprised, if you know that world, when people drop dead real quick.” Russell also interviewed Winston Scott’s son, Michael, who told Russell that an ex-CIA colleague of his father’s had confided that “certain people” had come by to see Win when he was bedridden after his backyard fall, which everyone believed had precipitated his death. This CIA source, according to Michael Scott, “had expressed strong doubt that his [Win Scott’s] death was an accident.” Michael Scott then added, “I was told that James Angleton was on a plane to Mexico within an hour of my dad’s death, so quickly that he carried no visa or passport and was held for a while at customs. He finally arrived pretending to be there for my father’s funeral. But he had really come to get his files.” (Dick Russell, The Man Who Knew Too Much (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2003. pp. 295-297).

54. Leary, Flashbacks, p. 194.

55. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 22.

56. Ibid. p. 29.

57. Alexandra Truitt, interview by the author, October 11, 2005.

58. Timothy Leary, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., November 7, 1990.

59. Carol Felsenthal, Power, Privilege and the Post: The Katharine Graham Story (New York: Seven Stories Press, 1993), p. 198n.

60. Cord Meyer Jr., Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA (New York: Harper & Row, 1980), p. 143.

Chapter 4. Deus Ex Machina

1. “History, Hume, and the Press,” Letter to John Norvell Washington, dated June 14, 1807, The Letters of Thomas Jefferson: 1743–1826. (Located at the University of Virginia Electronic Text Center). See the following: http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/JefLett.html

2. George Peter Lamb, interview by Leo Damore, May 23, 1991.

3. Katie McCabe, “She Had a Dream,” Washingtonian, March 2002, pp. 52–60, pp. 124–130.

4. Ibid., p. 55.

5. Ibid., p. 56.

6. Ibid., p. 55.

7. Ibid., p. 56.

8. Ibid., p. 60.

9. Ibid., pp. 57–58.

10. Katie McCabe and Dovey Johnson Roundtree, Justice Older Than the Law: The Life of Dovey Johnson Roundtree (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2009), p. 90.

11. McCabe, “She Had a Dream.” p. 60.

12. Dovey Roundtree, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., November 4, 1990.

13. Ibid.

14. The fact that Ray Crump had been with a girlfriend named Vivian on the towpath at the time of Mary Meyer’s murder was revealed to attorney Dovey Roundtree by both Ray Crump himself and by his mother, Martha Crump. Dovey Roundtree, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., April 4, 1992. See also McCabe and Roundtree, Justice Older Than the Law, pp. 195.

15. Dovey Roundtree, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., April 4, 1992.

16. Ibid.

17. Ibid.

18. Ibid.

19. Ibid.; Dovey Roundtree, interviews by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., February 23, 1991, and April 4, 1992. Roundtree’s conversations with the woman named Vivian are also covered in some detail in Justice Older Than the Law, pp. 195–196.

20. Roundtree, interview, February 23, 1991.

21. Roundtree, interview, November 4, 1990.

22. Ibid.

23. The distances mentioned were taken from the trial transcript, United States of America v. Ray Crump, Jr., Defendant, Criminal Case No. 930-64, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C., July 20, 1965, p. 119, pp. 710–711. The distances were measured again by the author on February 6, 2008, using GPS portable technology and found to be accurate within ten feet.

24. U.S. Park Police officer Ray Pollan, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., December 19, 1990.

25. Lamb, interview, May 23, 1991.

26. Ibid.

27. Crump v. Anderson, June 15, 1965, 122 U.S. App. D.C., 352 F.2d 649 (D.C. Cir. 1965). Circuit Judge George Thomas Washington pointed this out in his dissent during Crump’s appeal for a writ of habeas corpus, which was denied.

28. Trial transcript., p. 710.

29. Blue v. United States of America, 342 F.2d 894 (D.C. Cir. 1964), p. 900. The case was argued on May 18, 1964, and decided on October 29, 1964.

30. Lamb, interview, May 23, 1991.

31. George Peter Lamb, interview by the author, May 12, 2010.

32. U.S. v. Ray Crump, Jr., U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, Criminal No. 930-64. CJ# 1317-64. “The Clerk of said Court will please enter the appearance of Dovey J. Roundtree and George F. Knox, Sr. as attorneys for defendant in the above entitled cause.” George Peter Lamb and the Legal Aid Association withdrew from the Crump case on November 3, 1964.

33. Lamb, interview, May 23, 1991.

34. Roundtree, interview, November 4, 1990.

35. Ibid.; Dovey Roundtree, interviews by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., September 26, 1990, May 25, 1991, and April 4, 1992. In each of the interviews, Roundtree made it clear that her client, Ray Crump, was deteriorating mentally soon after entering his plea. She continued to believe that he was being abused by prison guards, in spite of daily visits from her and his family.

36. McCabe and Roundtree, Justice Older Than the Law, p. 193.

37. Ibid.

38. U.S. v. Ray Crump, Jr., United States District Court For The District of Columbia. Criminal No. 930-64. Motion for Mental Examination. Filed November 12, 1964. Harry M. Hull, Clerk. The motion also supports Detective Bernie Crooke’s statement to Dovey Roundtree that he had smelled beer when he arrested Crump at approximately 1:15 p.m. on October 12, 1964.

39. Superintendent Dale C. Cameron, MD, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, Washington, D.C., to Clerk of the Criminal Division for the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, January 13, 1965.

40. Crump v. Anderson, pp. 42–59. The transcript of the coroner’s inquest on October 19, 1964, is no longer available.

41. Jerry Hunter, Esq., interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., November 6, 1990.

42. Roundtree, interview, February 23, 1991.

43. McCabe and Roundtree, Justice Older Than the Law, p. 197.

44. Roundtree, interview, February 23, 1991.

45. River Patrolman police officer Frederick Q. Byers of the Harbor Patrol testified on three different occasions that he retrieved a jacket alleged to have belonged to Crump at 1:46 P.M on the afternoon of the murder. Trial transcript, p. 408, p. 409, p. 413. The distance computed to Three Sisters Island was from a GPS navigation instrument and Google Earth maps.

46. Both Wiggins and Branch would testify at the murder trial that they had no knowledge of the ownership, the work ticket, or the ultimate disposition of the stalled Nash Rambler sedan or who owned the vehicle. Trial transcript, p. 254, pp. 312–313.

47. David Acheson, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., December 10, 2008.

Chapter 5. Trial by Fire

1. Dovey Roundtree, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., May 25, 1991.

2. Charles Duncan, Esq., interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., December 20, 1990.

3. Roundtree, interview, May 25, 1991.

4. Ibid.

5. United States Department of Justice, confidential memo addressed to “Mr. Conrad,” February 24, 1965.

6. Roundtree, interview, May 25, 1991.

7. Ibid.

8. Dovey Roundtree, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., February 23, 1991.

9. Ibid.

10. Trial transcript, United States of America v. Ray Crump, Jr., Defendant, Criminal Case No. 930-64, United States District Court for the District of Columbia: Washington, D.C., July 20, 1965, p. 3.

11. Ibid., p. 4.

12. Ibid., p. 6.

13. Ibid., pp. 6–7.

14. Ibid., pp. 12–15.

15. Ibid., p. 16.

16. Dovey Roundtree, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., April 4, 1992.

17. Trial transcript, pp. 46–47.

18. Ibid.

19. Alfred Hantman, Esq., interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., May 21, 1991.

20. Trial transcript, p. 47.

21. Cord Meyer Jr., Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA (New York: Harper & Row, 1980), p. 143. Upon his return to Washington on the evening of Mary Meyer’s murder, Cord Meyer was met at the airport by his former brother-in-law and Washington attorney Steuart Pittman and career CIA official Wistar Janney.

22. Trial transcript, pp. 75–76.

23. Ibid., p. 70.

24. Ibid., p. 96.

25. Ibid., p. 383.

26. Ibid., p. 575.

27. Ibid., pp. 110–112.

28. Ibid., p. 122.

29. Ibid., p. 122.

30. Ibid., p. 124.

31. Ibid., p. 140.

32. Ibid., p. 130.

33. Ibid., pp. 131–132.

34. Ibid., p. 134.

35. Ibid., p. 136.

36. Ibid., p. 710.

37. Ibid., p. 137.

38. Ibid.

39. Ibid., p. 142.

40. Ibid., p. 207.

41. Ibid., p. 208.

42. Robert S. Bennett, Esq., interview by the author, Washington, D.C., November 11, 2009.

43. Trial transcript, p. 210.

44. Ibid., pp. 237–238.

45. Ibid., p. 241.

46. Ibid., p. 306.

47. Ibid., pp. 306–307.

48. Hantman, interview.

49. The distance from the 4300 block of Canal Road at the point that was directly across from the murder scene on the towpath to Fletcher’s Boat House was measured by both an automobile odometer and a GPS instrument and was found to be exactly 1.63 miles.

50. Trial transcript, p. 343.

51. Ibid., pp. 342–343.

52. Ibid., p. 352.

53. Roderick Sylvis, interview by the author, Wake Forest, N.C., July 23, 2008.

54. Ibid.

55. Trial transcript, pp. 345–347.

56. Sylvis, interview, July 23, 2008.

57. Trial transcript, p. 349.

58. Ibid., pp. 349–350.

59. Ibid., p. 350.

60. Ibid., p. 351.

61. Ibid.

62. Ibid., p. 342.

63. Sylvis, interview, July 23, 2008; Roderick Sylvis, telephone interview by the author, July 30, 2008.

64. Trial transcript, p. 359.

65. Ibid., p. 379.

66. Ibid., p. 381.

67. Ibid., p. 370.

68. Ibid., pp. 372–373.

69. Ibid., p. 378.

70. Ibid., pp. 407–413.

71. Ibid., p. 395, p. 424, p. 564.

72. Ibid., pp. 451–452.

73. Roberta Hornig, “Teacher Says He Passed by Mrs. Meyer,” Washington Evening Star, July 27, 1965.

74. Trial transcript, p. 657.

75. Ibid., p. 634.

76. Ibid., p. 658.

77. Ibid., pp. 658-659.

78. Ibid., pp. 766–767.

79. Ibid., p. 803.

80. Katie McCabe, interview by the author, September 22, 2008. The event was also mentioned by Nina Burleigh in A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), p. 269.

81. Trial transcript, pp. 943–944.

82. Hantman, interview.

83. Ibid.

84. Edward Savwoir, telephone interview by Leo Damore. From Damore’s notes, this appears to have occurred during the winter of 1989, though it is not completely clear. Savwoir died in Washington, D.C., on June 19, 1989.

85. George Peter Lamb, interview by the author, April 28, 2010.

86. Roundtree, interview, May 25, 1991.

87. Katie McCabe and Dovey Roundtree, Justice Older Than the Law: The Life of Dovey Johnson Roundtree (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2009), p. 218. Also, in two of author Leo Damore’s interviews with Dovey Roundtree (February 23, 1991 and May 25, 1991), she expressed her belief that Ray had been repeatedly beaten, abused, and “probably raped” during his eight months in jail before trial.

88. Robert S. Bennett, In the Ring: The Trials of a Washington Lawyer (New York: Crown, 2008), p. 36; Bennett, interview.

89. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 336.

90. Ibid., p. 281.

91. Ibid., p. 275.

92. McCabe and Roundtree, Justice Older Than the Law, pp. 190–192.

93. Ibid., p. 218.

94. Ibid., p. 189.

95. Roundtree, interview, April 4, 1992; Dovey Roundtree, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., March 4, 1993; McCabe and Roundtree, Justice Older Than the Law, pp. 205–206.

Chapter 6. “Prima Female Assoluta”

1. Ron Rosenbaum and Phillip Nobile, “The Curious Aftermath of JFK’s Best and Brightest Affair,” New Times, July 9, 1976, p. 25.

2. Ibid., p. 33.

3. Gifford Pinchot, Breaking New Ground (Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 1998), p.10. In this account, Gifford noted that his grandfather Cyrille was forced to leave France for participating in a plan to free Napoléon from the island of St. Helena. Cyrille Pinchot’s actions in France are also discussed in “Edgar Pinchot,” in Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania (Chicago: T. H. Beers, 1900), p. 277; and Alfred Mathews, A History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania(Philadelphia: R. T. Peek, 1886), pp. 862–863.

4. Nancy P. Pittman, “James Wallace Pinchot (1831–1908): One Man’s Evolution Toward Conservation in the Nineteenth Century,” Yale F&ES Centennial News (Fall 1999): 4.

5. Char Miller, “All in the Family: The Pinchots of Milford,” Pennsylvania History (Spring 1999): p. 126.

6. Ibid., p. 130.

7. Elaine Showalter, ed., These Modern Women: Autobiographical Essays from the Twenties (New York: Feminist Press, 1989), p. 126.

8. Ibid., pp. 3-27.

9. Ibid.

10. Ibid.

11. Ruth Pinchot to Amos Pinchot, July 2, 1923, Amos Pinchot Papers, 1863–1943, Family Correspondence, container 3, Library of Congress.

12. William Attwood, diary entries, December 21, 1935–January 30, 1936. The Attwood family graciously allowed me access to Bill Attwood’s private diaries, which were extensive, right up until his death in 1989.

13. Robert Dallek, An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917–1963 (Boston: Little, Brown, 2003), p. 79.

14. Ralph G. Martin, Seeds of Destruction: Joe Kennedy and His Sons (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1995), p. xxi.

15. Choate School letter to Leo Damore, October 5, 1992. The letter documents William Attwood’s date for Winter Festivities Weekend, February 1936, and the fact that John F. Kennedy (Class of 1935) was in attendance.

16. Nina Burleigh, A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), p. 57.

17. William Attwood, diary entry, February 21, 1936.

18. Ibid.

19. William Attwood, The Reds and the Blacks: A Personal Adventure (New York: Harper & Row, 1967), pp. 133–134.

20. William Attwood, diary entry, March 24, 1936.

21. Ibid., May 11, 1939.

22. Ibid., June 14, 1939.

23. Ibid.

24. Ibid, June 15, 1939.

25. Bibi Gaston, The Loveliest Woman in America (New York: William Morrow, 2008), p. 32.

26. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 61.

27. Mary Pinchot, “Requiem,” New York Times, January 25, 1940, p. 16.

28. Gaston, Loveliest Woman, p.18, p. 253.

29. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 25.

30. A former 1942 Vassar classmate of Mary Meyer’s who asked to remain anonymous, interview by the author, November 27, 2009.

31. Cord Meyer Jr., Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA (New York: Harper & Row, 1980), p. 34.

32. Croswell Bowen, “Young Man in Quest of Peace,” PM Sunday 3, no. 237 (March 21, 1948): p. 8.

33. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 29.

34. Anonymous Meyer classmate, interview.

35. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, pp. 72–73.

36. Robert L. Schwartz, interview by the author, New York, N.Y., October 16, 2008.

37. Ibid.

38. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 76.

39. Schwartz, interview.

40. James McConnell Truitt to Deborah Davis, January 30, 1979.

41. Schwartz, interview.

42. Ibid.

43. Ibid.

Chapter 7. Cyclops

1. Croswell Bowen, “Young Man in Quest of Peace,” PM Sunday 3, no. 237 (March 21, 1948): p. m6.

2. Cord Meyer Jr., “Waves of Darkness,” Atlantic Monthly, January 1946, p. 77.

3. Ibid, p. 80.

4. Bowen, “Young Man,” p. m 7.

5. Ibid.

6. Ibid.

7. Charles Bartlett, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., December 10, 2008.

8. Bowen, “Young Man,” p. m7.

9. Cord Meyer Jr., Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA (New York: Harper & Row, 1980), pp. 4–5.

10. Merle Miller, “One Man’s Long Journey: From a One World Crusade to the ‘Department of Dirty Tricks,,’” New York Times Magazine, January 7, 1973.

11. Bowen, “Young Man,” p. m8.

12. Cord Meyer Jr., Journal, 1945–1967, September 1944, box 5, Papers of Cord Meyer, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress.

13. Bowen, “Young Man,” p. m8.

14. Ibid., p. m6.

15. John H. Crider, “Veterans Caution on Parley Hopes,” New York Times, May 3, 1945.

16. Nigel Hamilton, JFK: Reckless Youth (New York: Random House, 1992), p. 702.

17. Ibid., p. 700.

18. Robert Dallek, An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917–1963 (Boston: Little, Brown, 2003), pp. 114–116.

19. Benjamin C. Bradlee, Conversations with Kennedy (New York: W. W. Norton, 1975), pp. 34–35. See also Nina Burleigh, A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), p. 315–20.

20. U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI), Restricted, top secret testimony given by Joseph W. Shimon, September 12, 1975. The document was provided to the author from Joseph Shimon’s daughter, Toni Shimon.

21. Bowen, “Young Man,” p. m7.

22. Bartlett, interview.

23. Cord Meyer Jr., Journal, 1945–1967, entry dated November 2, 1945, box 5, Papers of Cord Meyer, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress.

24. Hamilton, JFK, p. 703.

25. Ibid., pp. 690–691.

26. Anne Truitt, Daybook: The Journal of an Artist (New York: Pantheon, 1982), pp. 200–201.

27. Bowen, “Young Man,” p. m9.

28. Cord Meyer Jr., “A Serviceman Looks at the Peace,” Atlantic Monthly, September 1945.

29. Bowen, “Young Man,” p. m 9.

30. Ibid.

31. Ibid.

32. Hubert H. Humphrey to Cord Meyer Jr., October 21, 1949, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress..

33. Wesley T. Wooley, “Finding a Usable Past: The Success of the American World Federalism in the 1940s,” Peace & Change 24, no. 3 (July 1999).

34. “Young Men Who Care,” Glamour, July, 1947, pp. 27–29.

35. Meyer, Facing Reality, p. 55.

36. Meyer Journal, January 3, 1950.

37. Ibid., March 18, 1950.

38. Ibid., May 24, 1951.

39. Ibid., June 8, 1951.

40. Ibid., March 31, 1951.

41. Allen Dulles to Cord Meyer Jr., February 23, 1951, and March 31, 1951, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer; Cord Meyer Jr. to Allen Dulles, March 14, 1951, and May 23, 1951, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer; Cord Meyer Jr. to Gerald E. Miller, May 23, 1951, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer; Dean Acheson to Cord Meyer Jr., February 8, 1951, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer. There were also letters between journalist Walter Lippman and Cord during 1951 that might have suggested Lippman’s assistance to Cord in procuring some kind of job as a journalist, but nothing specific.

42. Meyer, Journal, December 10, 1945.

43. Ibid.

44. Victor Marchetti, interview by the author, Ashburn, Va., October 4, 2007.

45. Meyer, Journal, January 3, 1950.

46. Anonymous source, interview by the author, February 3, 2004.

47. Meyer, Journal, February 26, 1953.

48. Ibid., September 7, 1953. Here, Cord wrote several pages on what had occurred on the afternoon of August 31.

49. Meyer, Facing Reality, pp. 70–71.

50. Meyer, Journal, February 1, 1954. Cord recorded here the outcome of his trip to New York.

51. Ibid., November 8, 1954.

52. Benjamin C. Bradlee, A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995), p. 159.

53. James McConnell Truitt letter to Deborah Davis, May 11, 1979. The letter was part of the files of the late author Leo Damore and was subsequently verified by author Deborah Davis.

54. Meyer., Journal, October 18, 1955.

55. Ibid.

56. James McConnell Truitt letter to Deborah Davis, January 30, 1979. This event was also reported in Deborah Davis’s Katharine the Great (p. 230) and Nina Burleigh’s A Very Private Woman (p. 204).

57. David, Acheson, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., December 10, 2008.

58. Meyer, Journal, December 30, 1956.

59. Ibid., January 15, 1957.

60. Cord Meyer Jr., “Notes” 1957, box 5, Papers of Cord Meyer.

61. Truitt, Daybook, p. 165.

62. Meyer, “Notes.”

63. Ibid.

64. Meyer, “Waves of Darkness,” p. 80.

65. Miller, “One Man’s Long Journey,” p. 9.

66. Victor, Marchetti, interviews by the author, Ashburn, Va., November 18, 2005, and October 4, 2007. See also Carl Bernstein, “The CIA and the Media,” Rolling Stone, October 20, 1977.

67. Evan Thomas, The Very Best Men (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995), p. 330.

68. Scottie Lanahan, “Are You Playing the Games by the Rules in Washington?,” NEWS to Me …, Washington Post, April 2, 1967, p. H2.

69. Letter from the office of William Sloane Coffin Jr. at Yale University to the entering class of 1972, August 8, 1968, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer; Cord Meyer, Jr. to Bishop Paul Moore, September 13, 1968, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer; Cord Meyer Jr. to Cyrus R. Vance, September 26, 1968, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer; Cord Meyer Jr. to Dean Acheson, September 26, 1968, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer; Cord Meyer Jr. to William P. Bundy, September 26, 1968, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer; Bishop Paul Moore to Cord Meyer Jr., September 13, 1968, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer; Dean Acheson to Cord Meyer Jr., October 1, 1968, box 1, Papers of Cord Meyer.

70. Marc D. Charney, “Rev. William Sloane Coffin Dies at 81; Fought for Civil Rights and Against a War,” New York Times, April 13, 2006.

71. Miller, “One Man’s Long Journey,” p. 53.

Chapter 8. Personal Evolution

1. Gerald Clarke, Capote: A Biography (London: Cardinal, 1989), p. 271.

2. Gore Vidal, Palimpsest: A Memoir (New York: Penguin, 1995), p. 311.

3. Peter Evans, Nemesis (New York: HarperCollins, 2004), pp. 29–33.

4. Peter Collier and David Horowitz, The Kennedys: An American Drama (New York: Summit, 1984), p. 209. Another source confirmed this account as early as 1978; see Kitty Kelley, Jackie Oh! (Secaucus, N.J.: Lyle Stuart, 1978), pp. 57–58.

5. Edward Klein, All Too Human: The Love Story of Jack and Jackie Kennedy (New York: Pocket Books, 1996), pp. 220–221.

6. In 1931, the state of Nevada reduced the residency requirement for divorces to six weeks using the catch-all grounds of “mental cruelty.” This made Nevada the go-to place for a divorce. Because a woman who wished to avoid the embarrassment of getting a divorce in her hometown could be incognito in sparsely populated Nevada, this choice was popular with many women from prominent families.

7. Michael O’Brien, John F. Kennedy: A Biography (New York: St. Martin’s, 2005), p. 441.

8. Ibid., pp. 441–442.

9. Mary P. Meyer v. Cord Meyer, Jr., Case No. 175609, Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Decree, Second Judicial District Court of the State of Nevada, August 19, 1958.

10. Confidential source, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., 1991.

11. Robert Schwartz, interview by the author, New York, N.Y., October 16, 2008.

12. O’Brien, John F. Kennedy, p. 442.

13. Kenneth Noland, telephone interview by Nina Burleigh, September 13, 1996.

14. Schwartz interview.

15. James McConnell Truitt letter to Deborah Davis, May 11, 1979.

16. Deborah Davis, interview by Leo Damore, February 23, 1991; Deborah Davis, interview by the author, March 17, 2009. During Deborah Davis’s research for her book Katharine the Great in 1976, she traveled to Mexico and interviewed Jim Truitt for more than ten hours over a three-day period. The two then corresponded further by mail. Nina Burleigh also references the likelihood of Jim Truitt’s influence on “Mary’s initiation into drug experimentation.” See Nina Burleigh, A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unresolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), pp. 171–172.

17. Laura Bergquist, “The Curious Story Behind the New Cary Grant,” Look, September 1, 1959.

18. Martin A. Lee and Bruce Shlain, Acid Dreams: The CIA, LSD, and the Sixties Rebellion (New York: Grove, 1985), p. 93.

19. Ibid., p. 51.

20. Ibid.

21. Alfred Hubbard, interview by Dr. Oscar Janiger, October 13, 1978. A number of sources have referenced this interview, including the best history of the entire era ever written: Lee and Shlain’s Acid Dreams, cited in note 18 above.

22. H. P. Albarelli Jr., A Terrible Mistake: The Murder of Frank Olson and the CIA’s Secret Cold War Experiments (Walterville, Ore.: Trine Day, 2009). pp. 350-352. See also: H. P. Albarelli Jr. and Jeffrey Kaye, “Cries From the Past: Torture’s Ugly Echoes,” Truthout, Sunday, May 23, 2010. www.truthout.org.

23. Albarelli, A Terrible Mistake. This is, by far, the most thorough account of Frank Olson’s death and the history of the CIA’s MKULTRA program.

24. Ibid.

25. Lee and Shlain, Acid Dreams, pp. 52–53.

26. Robert Budd, interview by the author, January 21, 2004.

27. Morton Herskowitz, D.O., interview by the author, May 17, 2004.

28. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 165.

29. Budd, interview.

30. Noland, interview, September 13, 1996; Kenneth Noland, interview by Nina Burleigh, Carlyle Hotel, New York, N.Y., December 1996. In a follow-up email to me on July 6, 2005, author Burleigh shared the fact that Ken Noland and Mary frequented jazz clubs in Washington, D.C., and that Noland had talked with Burleigh “abt [sic] their LSD use.” Despite my own association with Kenneth Noland when he and Mary Meyer taught art at Georgetown Day School in the 1950s, he declined to speak with me. I am indebted to Nina Burleigh, who graciously shared a copy of her notes taken during these interviews.

31. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 175.

32. Confidential source, interview.

33. Sally Bedell Smith, Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House (New York: Random House, 2004), p. 235.

34. Ben Bradlee, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., January 31, 2007.

35. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 180.

36. Confidential source, interview.

37. Ibid.

38. Lee and Shlain, Acid Dreams, p. 192.

39. Ibid., p. 133.

40. Ibid., p. 189.

41. Collier and Horowitz, Kennedys, p. 176.

42. Robert Dallek, An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963 (Boston: Little, Brown, 2003), p. 152. See also Collier and Horowitz, Kennedys, p. 176; Doris Kearns Goodwin, The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys (New York: St. Martin’s, 1987), p. 838; Ralph G. Martin, A Hero for Our Time: An Intimate Story of the Kennedy Years (New York: Macmillan, 1983), p. 240. During an interview with this author in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on July 8, 2009, Priscilla J. McMillan claimed to have no recollection of making the quoted statements, or of the interviews she had given to David Horowitz and Robert Dallek. Both authors, however, confirmed with me that they had, in fact, interviewed Priscilla J. McMillan, and that she gave the statements as quoted in their respective books. David Horowitz confirmed this with me by telephone on July 13, 2009, and Robert Dallek confirmed it via email on July 14, 2009.

43. Martin, Hero for Our Time, p. 240.

44. Goodwin, Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys, pp. 837–838.

45. Dallek, Unfinished Life, p. 152.

46. Collier and Horowitz, Kennedys, p. 194.

47. Nigel Hamilton, JFK: Reckless Youth (New York: Random House, 1992), pp. 690–691.

48. Dallek, Unfinished Life, p. 84.

49. Ibid., p. 85.

50. Goodwin., Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys, p. 848.

51. Ibid., p. 858.

52. Dallek, Unfinished Life, p. 154.

53. Seymour M. Hersh, The Dark Side of Camelot (New York: Back Bay Books, 1997), pp. 234–236.

54. Anonymous source, interview by the author, November 14, 2009.

55. Hersh, Dark Side of Camelot, p. 237.

Chapter 9. Mary’s Mission

1. Timothy Leary, Flashbacks: An Autobiography (Los Angeles: J. P. Tarcher, 1983), p. 128.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., p. 129.

4. Timothy Leary, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., November 7, 1990.

5. Leary, Flashbacks, p. 129.

6. Ibid., pp. 128–130.

7. Nina Burleigh, A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), p. 194. Burleigh’s interview with White House counsel Myer Feldman provides the most specific, thorough documentation of how closely President Kennedy relied on the counsel of Mary Meyer.

8. Sally Bedell Smith, Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House (New York: Random House, 2004), p. 255.

9. Leo Damore, interview by the author, Centerbrook, Conn., February 1992.

10. Smith, Grace and Power, p. 254.

11. Leary, Flashbacks, pp. 227–231.

12. Leary, interview.

13. Robert Greenfield, Timothy Leary: A Biography (New York: Harcourt, 2006), p. 245.

14. Ibid., pp. 423–427.

15. Carolyn Pfeiffer Bradshaw, interview by the author, March 20, 2009. Ms. Bradshaw confirmed that she and her late husband, Jon, were very close friends of Timothy and Barbara Leary and that they spent a great deal of time together.

16. Leary, interview. See also Timothy Leary, “The Murder of Mary Pinchot Meyer,” premier issue, Rebel: A Newsweekly with A Cause, no. 1 (January 1984): pp. 44–49. In addition, author Carol Felsenthal covers this topic thoroughly in her book Power, Privilege, and the Post: The Katharine Graham Story (New York: Seven Stories Press, 1993.)

17. In Leo Damore’s possession were two letters/reports from investigator William Triplett. The first was dated “14 December 1983” and was eight single-spaced typewritten pages in length. It was addressed to “Timothy Leary P.O. Box 69886, Los Angeles, CA. 90069.” The second letter/report was dated “5 January 1984” and was six pages in length. Sometime in early 1991, Damore communicated with Triplett, who responded to Damore in a letter dated March 7, 1991, in which he verified his previous work with Timothy Leary. Copies of all three letters are currently in my possession.

18. Robert Greenfield, interview by the author, January 23, 2009.

19. Ibid.

20. Leary, interview. Damore followed up with Leary in several telephone calls over the next two-plus years into March 1993, as his notes indicate, with regard to specific questions that arose from the initial interview in 1990.

21. Timothy Leary’s relationship with Cord Meyer was also documented by Leary biographer Robert Greenfield, who told me that Leary’s secretary in Berkeley verified this when he interviewed her. Greenfield, interview.

22. Peggy Mellon Hitchcock, interview by the author, March 16, 2009.

23. Leary, interview.

24. Ibid.

25. Peter Janney letter to Anne Chamberlin, January 27, 2009.

26. Anne Chamberlin letter to Peter Janney, February 5, 2009.

27. C. David Heymann, A Woman Named Jackie (New York: Carol Communications, 1989), p. 375. In a letter to Leo Damore dated July 3, 1990, Heymann wrote, “I also interviewed people like Mary’s sister, Tim Leary and others who knew her [Mary Meyer].”

28. I could locate no interview with Timothy Leary, Tony Bradlee, or James Angleton in any of the material that C. David Heymann had provided to the Special Collections and University Archives at SUNY–Stony Brook’s Memorial Library.

29. Heymann, Woman Named Jackie, p. 651. In his notes for Chapter 22, Heymann stated that he had interviewed “James Angleton,” but provided no citation as to the date or location of such interview. Recently, much of Heymann’s so-called research has met with increasing criticism, questioning its veracity. See, for instance, Lisa Pease’s review of Heymann’s book Bobby and Jackie: A Love Story (2009) at Citizens for Truth about the Kennedy Assassination, www.ctka.net/reviews/heymann.html.

30. Leary, interview.

31. Ibid.

32. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 341–38.

33. In a letter dated March 10, 1983, Jim Truitt’s second wife, Evelyn Patterson Truitt, told author Anthony Summers the following: “My husband’s files [James McConnell Truitt] were all stolen by an ex-CIA agent, Herbert Barrows. I called the F.B.I. but don’t know what happened to his 30 years of carefully kept records.”

34. Deborah Davis, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., March 17, 2009. I also had a number of subsequent phone conversations with Ms. Davis about Timothy Leary, whom she came to know well, in addition to Jim Truitt.

35. Bernie Ward and Granville Toogood, “Former Vice President of Washington Post Reveals JFK 2-Year White House Romance,” National Enquirer, March 2, 1976, p. 4.

36. Ibid.

37. January 1962 was the date first disclosed by James Truitt in the March 1976 issue of the National Enquirer. Ibid.

38. White House Secret Service logs at John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston, Mass. This date was also substantiated by Sally Bedell Smith and Nina Burleigh in their respective books, Grace and Power and A Very Private Woman, pp. 329-330.

39. Smith, Grace and Power, pp. 233–234. This is the latest and most thoroughly researched book documenting these facts.

40. Herbert S. Parmet, JFK: The Presidency of John F. Kennedy (New York: Dial, 1983), pp. 306–307.

41. Dino Brugioni, interview by the author, January 30, 2009. During the Kennedy presidency, Brugioni was the top deputy for Arthur C. Lundahl, director of the CIA’s most secretive facility: the National Photographic Interpretation Center (NPIC). Brugioni knew personally some of the agents in Kennedy’s Secret Service detail; they told him that they took the president on a number of occasions to Mary Meyer’s house in Georgetown. Brugioni is also the author of the best-selling book Eyeball to Eyeball: The Inside Story of the Cuban Missile Crisis (New York: Random House, 1990).

42. Benjamin C. Bradlee, A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995), p. 268.

43. Benjamin C. Bradlee, Conversations with Kennedy (New York: W. W. Norton, 1975), p. 54.

44. Ralph G. Martin, Seeds of Destruction: Joe Kennedy and His Sons (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1995), p. 371.

45. Damore, interview. Damore mentioned this incident the very first time we met in February 1992 and repeated it several times subsequent to that.

46. Ben Bradlee, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., January 31, 2007.

47. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 43.

48. Bradlee, A Good Life, p. 232.

49. Bradlee, Conversations with Kennedy, p. 187. Bradlee said the remark was made on April 29, 1963.

50. Smith, Grace and Power, p. 364.

51. Ibid., p. 365.

52. Ibid.

53. Ibid., pp. 144–145.

54. Bradlee, interview.

55. Charles Bartlett, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., December 10, 2008.

56. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 298.

57. Bartlett, interview.

58. Damore, interview. Damore also shared O’Donnell’s comments with his close friend and attorney Jimmy Smith, as well as with Timothy Leary during their interview in November 1990.

59. Ibid.

60. Donald H. Wolfe, The Last Days of Marilyn Monroe. (New York: William Morrow, 1998), pp. 461–462; Donald H. Wolfe, interview by the author, June 2, 2005. Wolfe’s account was meticulously researched and substantiated by several different sources.

61. Wolfe, Last Days of Marilyn Monroe, p. 462.

62. Bryan Bender, “A Dark Corner of Camelot,” Boston Globe, January 23, 2011.

63. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 194.

64. Ibid.

65. Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Memorandum for the President, December 29, 1962, JFKPOF-065-019, Papers of John F. Kennedy, Presidential Papers, President’s Office Files, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston, Mass. See also Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 194.

66. Tim Weiner, Legacy of Ashes (New York: Doubleday, 2007), p. 167. See also Tim Weiner, “The True and Shocking History of the CIA,” July 30, 2007, RINF News, www.rinf.com/alt-news/latest-news/the-true-and-shocking-history-of-the-cia/876/.

67. John Lukacs, George Kennan: A Study of Character (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press 2007), p. 98.

68. Peter Grose, Gentleman Spy: The Life of Allen Dulles (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1994), p. 293.

69. The most recent and thorough account is Stephen Kinzer’s All the Shah’s Men (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2003).

70. John Foster Dulles and the law firm Sullivan & Cromwell had been the legal counsel for the United Fruit Company for decades. John Foster and Allen Dulles were both major shareholders in the company, with Allen serving as a member of United Fruit’s board of trustees. See Stephen Kinzer, Overthrow: America’s Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq (New York: Times Books, 2006), pp. 129–130; Walter La Feber, Inevitable Revolutions: The United States in Central America (New York: W. W. Norton, 1993), pp. 120–121.

71. Donald E. Deneselya, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., April 10, 2007.

72. L. Fletcher Prouty, JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy (New York: Citadel, 1996), p. 155.

73. Joan Mellen, A Farewell to Justice (Dulles, Va.: Potomac Books, 2005), p.162. Author Mellen’s exact reference for this quote was as follows: “Forty years later, historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr., a Kennedy adviser, would remark quietly to Jim Garrison’s old classmate Wilmer Thomas that they had been at war with ‘the national security people.’”

74. Richard Reeves, President Kennedy: Profiles of Power (New York: Touchstone, 1993), p. 103.

75. David C. Martin, Wilderness of Mirrors (Guilford, Conn.: Lyons Press, 1980), p. 118.

76. Daniel Schorr, commentary on Noah Adams’s NPR program All Things Considered, March 26, 2001.

77. John M. Newman, JFK and Vietnam: Deception, Intrigue, and the Struggle for Power (New York: Warner, 1992), pp. 98–99.

78. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., A Thousand Days: John F. Kennedy in the White House (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1965), p. 428.

79. Willie Morris, New York Days (Boston: Little Brown, 1993), p. 36.

80. According to James Srodes in his book Allen Dulles: Master of Spies (Washington, D.C.: Regnery, 1999), p. 547, Dulles did not learn that he would be fired from the CIA until the last week of August 1961. President Kennedy then announced on September 27 that John A. McCone would replace him.

81. James Bamford, Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency (New York: Random House, 2002), p. 82.

82. James K. Galbraith and Heather A. Purcell, “Did the U.S. Military Plan a Nuclear First Strike for 1963?,” American Prospect 5, no. 19 (September 1994): pp. 88–96.

Chapter 10. Peace Song

1. Sally Bedell Smith, Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House (New York: Random House, 2004), p. 315.

2.  John F. Kennedy, “Cuban Missile Crisis Address to the Nation” (televised speech, October 22, 1962), American Rhetoric, www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jfkcubanmissilecrisis.html (authenticity certified).

3. James W. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2008), p. 20.

4. Known as the “Pen Pal Correspondence,” the private letters between Kennedy and Khrushchev were published together in the State Department’s Foreign Relations of the United States [FRUS], 1961–1963, vol. 6., Kennedy-Khrushchev Exchanges(Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1966). They can also be accessed online; see “Kennedy-Khrushchev Exchanges,” U.S. Department of State, www.state.gov/www/about_state/history/volume_vi/exchanges.html. All quotations from that correspondence appearing in this chapter were obtained at that web page.

5. Letter from Chairman Khrushchev to President Kennedy, September 29, 1961, “Kennedy-Khrushchev Exchanges,” no. 21. See note 4 above for location.

6. Letter from President Kennedy to Chairman Khrushchev, October 16, 1961, “Kennedy-Khrushchev Exchanges,” no. 22. See note 4 above for location.

7. Leo Damore, interviews by the author, February 1992 and October 1992. Damore shared a number of incidents that Kenny O’Donnell had told him about concerning Mary and Jack, specifically mentioning Mary confronting Jack on the dangers of the resumption of nuclear testing in April 1962.

8. Telegram from the Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Department of State, October 26, 1962, “Kennedy-Khrushchev Exchanges,” no. 65.

9. Letter from Chairman Khrushchev to President Kennedy, October 27, 1962, “Kennedy-Khrushchev Exchanges,” no. 66.

10. Nikita Khrushchev, Khrushchev Remembers, trans. and ed. Strobe Talbott (New York: Bantam, 1971), pp. 497–498.

11. Michael Dobbs, One Minute to Midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and Castro on the Brink of Nuclear War (New York: Knopf, 2008), p. 4. See also Robert S. McNamara, In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam (New York: Vintage, 1996), p. 341; Douglas P. Horne, Inside the Assassination Records Review Board: The U.S. Government’s Final Attempt to Reconcile the Conflicting Medical Records in the Assassination of JFK (printed by author, 2009), pp. 1710–1711, pp. 1716–1718, p. 1774. The most thorough account is contained in John D. Gresham and Norman Polmar, Defcon-2 (Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, 2006).

12. Interview with Robert S. McNamara, December 6, 1998, Episode 11, National Security Archive, George Washington University. Located at: http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/coldwar/interviews/episode-11/mcnamara1.html

13. Richard Rhodes, Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995), p. 575. The author interviewed a retired SAC wing commander who told him, “I knew what my target was—Leningrad.” The wing commander’s SAC alert bombers “deliberately flew past their turn around points toward Soviet airspace, an unambiguous threat which Soviet radar operators would certainly have recognized and reported. The bombers only turned around when Soviet freighters carrying missiles to Cuba stopped dead in the Atlantic.”

14. Gresham and Polmar, Defcon-2, pp. 244–246.

15. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., Robert Kennedy and His Times (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2002), p. 524.

16. Ibid., p. 525.

17. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable, p. 44.

18. For background information on the life of Philip L. Graham, see David Halberstam, The Powers That Be (New York: Knopf, 1975); Deborah Davis, Katharine the Great: Katharine Graham and the Washington Post (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1979); Katharine Graham, Personal History (New York: Vintage, 1998); and Carol Felsenthal, Power, Privilege and the Post: The Katharine Graham Story (New York: Seven Stories Press,1993).

19. There is extensive documentation of the existence of the CIA’s Operation Mockingbird, as noted in previous chapters. I am particularly indebted to the former CIA operative and author Victor Marchetti for the information he provided me during my interview with him on November 18, 2005, and October 4, 2007, in Ashburn, Virginia.

20. Felsenthal, Power, Privilege and the Post, pp. 372–373.

21. Ibid., pp. 197–198.

22. Halberstam, Powers That Be, pp. 381–382.

23. Ibid., pp. 215–216.

24. Davis, Katharine the Great (1979), p. 164.

25. Ibid.

26. Smith, Grace and Power, p. 349.

27. William Shover, interview by the author, March 18, 2009. Leo Damore also interviewed Shover on October 8, 1993.

28. Ben Bradlee, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., January 31, 2007.

29. Smith, Grace and Power, p. 349.

30. Graham, Personal History, p. 310.

31. Carol Felsenthal, interview by the author, August 10, 2010.

32. Ibid.

33. Felsenthal, Power, Privilege and the Post, p. 216.

34. Felsenthal, interview.

35. White House telephone logs, calls to Evelyn Lincoln on January 18, 1963, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston, Massachusetts.

36. Davis, Katharine the Great (1979), p. 165.

37. H. P. Albarelli Jr., A Terrible Mistake: The Murder of Frank Olson and the CIA’s Secret Cold War Experiments (Walterville, Ore.: Trine Day, 2009), p. 115.

38. Davis, Katharine the Great (1979), p. 165. See also Felsenthal, Power, Privilege and the Post, p. 206, p. 210.

39. Ibid., p. 168; Deborah Davis, interview by the author, March 17, 2009. See also “An Interview with Deborah Davis,” in Popular Alienation: A Steamshovel Press Reader, ed. Kenn Thomas (Lilburn, Ga.: IllumiNet Press, 1995), p. 83; Felsenthal, Power, Privilege and the Post, pp. 371–373.

40. Davis, Katharine the Great (1979), p. 160.

41. Ralph G. Martin, Seeds of Destruction: Joe Kennedy and His Sons (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1995), 322–323.

42. Ibid., p. 372.

43. Ralph G. Martin, A Hero for Our Time: An Intimate Story of the Kennedy Years (New York: Macmillan, 1983), p. 354.

44. Smith, Grace and Power, pp. 351–352.

45. Ibid., p. 352. Adlai Stevenson’s letter to Marietta Tree on March 10, 1963, is in the collection Papers, 1917–1995, housed in the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, Boston, Mass.

46. Smith, Grace and Power, p. 352.

47. Horne, Assassination Records Review Board, 5: pp. 1382–1383.

48. Toni Shimon, interviews by the author, June 17, 2004, February 15, 2007, January 7, 2008, and March 30, 2010.

49. Shimon, interview, February 15, 2007.

50. Timothy Leary, Flashbacks: An Autobiography (Los Angeles: J. P. Tarcher, 1983), p. 162.

51. Ibid.

52. Ibid.

53. Ibid., p. 163.

54. Robert Greenfield, Timothy Leary: A Biography (New York: Harcourt, 2006), p. 199.

55. Timothy Leary, High Priest (Oakland, Calif.: Ronin, 1968), pp. 256–257.

56. Leary, Flashbacks, p. 171.

57. Leo Damore, interview by the author, Centerbrook, Conn., April 1993. Damore and I discussed the postcard Mary Meyer had allegedly sent Leary (Flashbacks, p. 171), which, according to Damore, was further confirmation of what his confidential source had told him. I suspected that the source of this information was Mary Meyer’s close friend Anne Chamberlin, whom I also knew, but who refused to be interviewed by me. Anne Chamberlin died on December 31, 2011.

58. Greenfield, Timothy Leary, p. 547. As of June 2011, the entire Timothy Leary archive has been purchased by the New York Public Library. The collection includes some 335 boxes of papers, videotapes, photographs, and more. See Patricia Cohen, “New York Public Library Buys Timothy Leary’s Papers,” New York Times, June 16, 2011, p. C1–2.

59. Glenn T. Seaborg, Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Test Ban. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983), p. 199.

60. Alun Rees, “Nobel Prize Genius Crick Was High on LSD when He Discovered the Secret of Life,” Associated Newspapers, 2004. This article originally appeared in the Mail on Sunday (London), August 8, 2004. It can be viewed at Serendipity, www.serendipity.li/dmt/crick_lsd.htm.

61. Alcoholics Anonymous, “Pass It On”: The Story of Bill Wilson and How the A.A. Message Reached the World (New York: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, 1995), pp. 370–371. See also Rich English, “The Dry Piper: The Strange Life and Times of Bill Wilson, Founder of A.A.,” Modern Drunkard Magazine, www.moderndrunkardmagazine.com/issues/01-05/0105-dry-piper.htm.

62. John Markoff, What the Dormouse Said: How the 60s Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry (New York: Viking, 2005), pp. xviii–xix.

63. Interview with Oliver Stone on Real Time With Bill Maher HBO (episode #159). Original airdate: June 27, 2009.

64. R.R. Griffiths, W.A. Richards, U. McCann, and R. Jesse (2006) “Psilocybin can occasion mystical experiences having substantial and sustained personal meaning and spiritual significance.” Psychopharmacology 187: pp. 268 - 283. Also, Griffiths, R.R.; Richards, W.A.; Johnson, M.W.; McCann, U.D.; Jesse, R. 2008. “Mystical-type experiences occasioned by psilocybin mediate the attribution of personal meaning and spiritual significance 14 months later.” Journal of Psychopharmacology 22(6): pp. 621-632.

65. Theodore Sorensen, interview by the author, January 10, 2006.

66. John F. Kennedy, “American University Commencement Address” (speech, American University, Washington, D.C., June 10, 1963), American Rhetoric, www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jfkamericanuniversityaddress.html (authenticity certified).

67. Max Frankel, “Harriman to Lead Test-Ban Mission to Soviet in July; Kennedy Envoy Expected to Tell Khrushchev of Hope for Nuclear Breakthrough,” New York Times, June 12, 1963, p. 1.

68. Kennedy, “American University Commencement Address.”

69. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., A Thousand Days: John F. Kennedy in the White House (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1965), p. 311.

70. Kennedy, “American University Commencement Address.”

71. Ibid.

72. Ibid.

73. Ibid.

74. Ibid.

75. Ibid.

76. Ibid.

77. Message from Chairmen Khrushchev and Brezhnev to President Kennedy, July 4, 1963, Department of State, Presidential Files: Lot 66 D 204 (no classification marking). The source text is a Department of State translation of a commercial telegram from Moscow. Another copy of this message and the transliterated Russian text is in the National Security Files, Countries Series, USR, Khrushchev Correspondence, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston, Mass.

78. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable, p. 46.

79. Richard Reeves, President Kennedy: Profiles of Power (New York: Touchstone, 1993), p. 545.

80. Ibid., p. 549.

81. John F. Kennedy, “Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Address to the Nation,” (televised speech, July 26, 1963), American Rhetoric, www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jfknucleartestbantreaty.htm (authenticity certified).

82. Joseph Alsop to Evangeline Bruce, June 12, 1963, Joseph Alsop and Steward Alsop Papers, Part III, Box 130, Library of Congress.

83. William Attwood, The Reds and the Blacks: A Personal Adventure (New York: Harper & Row, 1967), pp. 133–134.

84. John F. Kennedy, “Civil Rights Address” (televised speech, June 11, 1963), American Rhetoric, www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jfkcivilrights.htm (authenticity certified).

85. White House Telephone Memorandum for June 12, 1963, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston, Mass. “Mrs. Meyers [sic]” called at 2:14 P.M. and was transferred to the president by Evelyn Lincoln. Mrs. Lincoln recorded her phone number as “FE 7 2697.”

86. White House Secret Service logs show “Mary Meyers” signed in at 7:30 P.M. on July 3, 1963, and was escorted to the White House residence. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston, Mass.

87. Leary, Flashbacks, p. 178.

88. Ibid., pp. 178–179.

89. Timothy Leary, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., November 7, 1990.

90. Halberstam, Powers That Be, pp. 382–383.

91. Davis, Katharine the Great (1979), p. 169.

92. Felsenthal, Power, Privilege and the Post, p. 218.

93. Graham, Personal History, p. 331.

94. “Interview with Deborah Davis,” p. 83.

95. Graham, Personal History, p. 332. Katharine Graham documented “William Smith” as their “caretaker” at Glen Welby at the time of Phil Graham’s death.

96. Dovey Roundtree, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., February 23, 1991.

97. Bill Corson made this remark to Roger Charles at the time of the Senate subcommittee hearings led by Senator Frank Church in 1977 when Charles commented on the number of alleged “suicides” that had taken place in connection with the Kennedy assassination. Roger Charles reiterated Corson’s comment to me in December 2010.

98. William E. Colby, testimony, U.S. Senate, September 16, 1975, Hearings Before the Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, vol. 1, pp. 16–17.

99. Davis, Katharine the Great (1979), p. 160.

100. Michael Hasty, “Secret Admirers: The Bushes and the Washington Post,” Online Journal, February 5, 2004.

101. Norman Solomon, “Katharine Graham and History: Slanting the First Draft,” July 19, 2001, FAIR: Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, www.fair.org/index.php?page=2140.

102. Speech given in 1988 by Washington Post editor-owner Katharine Graham at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, to senior CIA employees. See the following: Stephen L. Vaughn, Encyclopedia of American Journalism (New York: Routledge, 2008), p. 201.

103. Smith, Grace and Power, p. 395.

104. Ibid., p. 398.

105. Peter Evans, Nemesis (New York: HarperCollins, 2004), p. 77.

106. Ibid., p. 105.

107. Leary, Flashbacks, pp. 190–191.

108. Ibid.

109. Timothy Leary, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., November 7, 1990.

110. Stephen Siff, “Henry Luce’s Strange Trip—Coverage of LSD in Time and Life, 1954–1968,” Journalism History 34, no. 3 (Fall 2008): pp. 126–134.

111. Alan Brinkley, The Publisher: Henry Luce and His American Century (New York: Knopf, 2010), p. 434.

112. Graham, Personal History, p. 196.

113. Ibid., p. 305.

114. Ibid., pp. 343–344.

115. Ibid., p. 492.

116. “Interview with Deborah Davis,” p. 83.

117. Smith, Grace and Power, p. 411.

118. Telegram from the Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Department of State, October 10, 1963, “Kennedy-Khrushchev Exchanges,” no. 118.

119. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable, p. 267.

120. Leo, Damore, interview by the author, Centerbrook, Conn., February 1992.

121. Kenneth P. O’Donnell and David F. Powers, Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye: Memories of John Fitzgerald Kennedy (New York: Pocket Books, 1973), p. 16.

122. Simone Attwood, interview by the author, Ithaca, N.Y., November 3, 2009.

123. Gordon Chase, “Cuba—Policy,” White House memorandum, April 11, 1963, access link in “Kennedy Sought Dialogue with Cuba: Initiative with Castro Aborted by Assassination, Declassified Documents Show,” National Security Archive, www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB103/index.htm.

124. David Talbot, Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years (New York: Free Press, 2007), p. 228.

125. Interview with Jean Daniel, Kennedy and Castro: The Secret History, Discovery/Times, November 25, 2003.

126. Ibid.

127. Ibid.

128. Talbot, Brothers, p. 217.

129. Arthur Krock, “The Intra-Administration War in Vietnam,” In the Nation, New York Times, October 3, 1963, p. 34.

130. Robert McNamara made the following comment during Errol Morris’s film The Fog of War: “I was present with the President when together we received information of that coup. I’ve never seen him more upset. He totally blanched. President Kennedy and I had tremendous problems with Diem, but my God, he was the authority, he was the head of state. And he was overthrown by a military coup. And Kennedy knew and I knew, that to some degree, the U.S. government was responsible for that.”

131. Nina Burleigh, A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), p. 220.

132. Smith, Grace and Power, p. 444.

133. Ibid., p. 454.

134. Ariel Dougherty, interview by the author, December 3, 2009. Ms. Dougherty was a student at Georgetown Day School in Washington, D.C., when Mary Meyer and Ken Noland taught art studio classes in the late 1950s, as was the author.

135. Leary, Flashbacks, p. 194.

136. Ibid. Timothy Leary also reiterated this event to Leo Damore during his interview of November 7, 1990.

137. Leary, interview.

Chapter 11. After Dallas

1. Jim Marrs, interview by the author, August 13, 2011. See also: John Armstrong, “Harvey, Lee and Tippit: A New Look at the Tippit Shooting,” Probe, January-February, 1998 issue (Vol.5 No. 2). http://www.ctka.net/pr198-jfk.html While the 1964 Warren Report maintained that officer J.D. Tippit was shot and killed by Lee Harvey Oswald at about 1:15 P.M., many researchers continue to place Oswald in the balcony of the Texas Theater “shortly after 1:00 P.M.” According to author Marrs, and assassination researcher John Armstrong, Butch Burroughs was an employee at the Texas Theater. He heard someone enter the theater shortly after 1:00 P.M. and go to the balcony. It was Lee Harvey Oswald who had apparently entered the theater and gone to the balcony without being initially seen by Burroughs. At approximately 1:15 P.M., Oswald came down from the balcony and bought popcorn from Burroughs. Burroughs then watched him walk down the aisle and take a seat on the main floor.

2. Matthew Walton, interview by the author, Woods Hole, Mass., August 28, 2007. Matthew recalled Agnes Meyer making the remark to his father, William Walton.

3. James W. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2008), pp. 202–207, pp. 213–214. See also Abraham Bolden, The Echo from Dealey Plaza (New York: Harmony, 2008), pp. 55–56, p. 58. Secret Service agent Bolden documented the initial evidence for this assassination attempt in Chicago.

4. Anthony Summers, Not in Your Lifetime (New York: Marlowe, 1998), pp. 308–309.

5. David Duffy and Bennett Bolton, “JFK’s Secret Mistress Assassinated Because She Knew Too Much,” National Enquirer, July 9, 1996, p. 17.

6. Bennett Bolton, interview by the author, November 8, 2005.

7. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable, pp. 213–217.

8. Nina Burleigh, A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), p. 220. Interviewing only Mary Fischer on the topic of Kennedy’s assassination, Burleigh never pursued any of Mary Meyer’s concerns about what had really happened in Dallas, leaving the reader to believe that she ultimately was convinced that Lee Harvey Oswald was responsible for the death of the president.

9. Ron Rosenbaum and Phillip Nobile, “The Curious Aftermath of JFK’s Best and Brightest Affair,” New Times, July 9, 1976, p. 29.

10. Leo Damore, interview by the author, Centerbrook, Conn., February 1992. Damore spoke often to me about what Kenny O’Donnell had told him regarding Mary Meyer’s influence on President Kennedy.

11. Tip O’Neill, Man of the House: The Life and Political Memoirs of Speaker Tip O’Neill, with William Novak (New York: Random House, 1987), p. 178.

12. Ibid.

13. WCAP Radio producer and talk show host Woody Woodland interviewed Douglas P. Horne, author of Inside the Assassination Records Review Board: The U.S. Government’s Final Attempt to Reconcile the Conflicting Medical Evidence in the Assassination of JFK, 5 vols. (printed by author, 2009) on the air on November 19, 2009, from Lowell, Massachusetts. During that interview, Mr. Woodland recounted verbatim his conversation with Dave Powers in late 1991, following the release of Oliver Stone’s film JFK.

14. Jim Marrs, Crossfire: The Plot That Killed Kennedy. New York: Carroll & Graf, 1989), p. 482.

15. David Talbot, Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years (New York: Free Press, 2007), p. 6. See also Talbot’s notes, p. 411.

16. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., Robert Kennedy and His Times (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2002), p. 616.

17. Talbot, Brothers, p. 7.

18. Ibid.

19. This was confirmed in my interview on July 15, 2009, with an individual who wanted to remain anonymous, and who knew well the person who had been in the presidential entourage in Dallas on November 22, 1963. The person in the president’s entourage also knew Mary Meyer very well.

20. Dino Brugioni, interview by the author, February 13, 2009. I first contacted Mr. Brugioni by telephone on January 30, 2009. It was during that initial interview I first learned that he had worked closely with my father, Wistar Janney, on several operations. When I made a passing reference to the Zapruder film, Brugioni corrected my reference and told me that the CIA had been in possession of the film the day after the assassination. This revelation prompted a subsequent series of interviews between Brugioni and myself that took place on February 12, 13, 14, March 6, 10, and April 30, 2009. I later visited Dino Brugioni at his home in Hartwood, Virginia, on June 27, 2009, for additional clarification and input.

21. Ibid.

22. Schlesinger, Robert Kennedy and His Times, p. 616. See “Author’s journal, December 9, 1963,” p. 988n49.

23. Homer McMahon, interview by the Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB), July 14, 1997, National Archives II, College Park, Md.

24. Ibid.

25. Brugioni, interview, February 13, 2009.

26. Dino Brugioni, interview by the author, Hartwood, Va., April 28, 2011.

27. Horne, Assassination Records Review Board, 4: p. 1241.

28. Ibid., 3: p. 778.

29. Ibid., 1: p. 58, p. 76, p. 171; ibid., 3: pp. 727–881.

30. Ibid., 2: pp. 630–640. See also Appendix 23 and Appendix 28 in that volume.

31. David S. Lifton, Best Evidence: Disguise and Deception in the Assassination of John F. Kennedy (New York: Macmillan, 1980); Horne, Assassination Records Review Board, Volume II.

32. Tom Wicker, “Gov. Connally Shot; Mrs. Kennedy Safe,” New York Times, November 23, 1963,. p. 1.

33. White House Transcript 1327-C. This is a verbatim record of the remarks made by Dr. Perry and Dr. Clark at the Parkland Memorial Hospital’s press conference, which convened at 3:16 P.M on November 22, 1963. It is available at the Mary Ferrell Foundation’s website (www.maryferrell.org). See also Horne, Assassination Records Review Board, 2: p. 646.

34. Horne, Assassination Records Review Board, 2: pp. 644–645.

35. Testimony of Dr. Malcolm Perry, March 25 and March 30, 1964, Warren Commission Proceedings. See also Horne, Assassination Records Review Board, 2: pp. 648–649.

36. Mark Lane, “Oswald Innocent? A Lawyer’s Brief,” National Guardian, December 19, 1963. Staunton Lynd and Jack Minnis, “Seeds of Doubt: Some Questions About the Assassination,” New Republic, December 21, 1963, pp. 14-20.

37. Peter Kihss, “Lawyer Urges Defense for Oswald at Inquiry,” New York Times, December 19, 1963.

38. Mark Lane, “Oswald Innocent? A Lawyer’s Brief,” National Guardian, December 19, 1963.

39. Ibid. Also, see the following: Mark Lane, Plausible Denial: Was the CIA Involved in the Assassination of JFK?, (New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press, 1991), p. 355. Lane quoted the December 1, 1963. article found in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

40. Mark Lane, “Oswald Innocent? A Lawyer’s Brief,” National Guardian, December 19, 1963. Also in Plausible Denial: Was the CIA Involved in the Assassination of JFK?, by Mark Lane (New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press, 1991), p. 360.

41. Lane, Plausible Denial, p. 322.

42. Harry S. Truman, editorial, “U.S. Should Hold CIA to Intelligence Role,” Washington Post, December 22, 1963, A11. This was the title of the editorial as it appeared in the paper on the morning of December 22, 1963, but for some unknown reason it has since been cited as “Limit CIA Role to Intelligence.”

43. John Kelin, Praise from a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report (San Antonio, Tex.: Wings Press, 2007), p. 451.

44. Ibid., p. 553n62; John Kelin, interview by the author, September 16, 2010.

45. Ray Marcus, interview by the author, September 28, 2010.

46. Peter Dale Scott, Deep Politics and the Death of JFK (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996), p. 295.

47. Marcus, interview. John Kelin also told me he discussed this incident with Ray Marcus at some length in an interview with me on September 16, 2010, as did the disaffected former CIA analyst Raymond McGovern on February 26, 2011.

48. Memorandum for Mr. Lawrence R. Houston, General Counsel, from A. W. Dulles, Subject: Visit to the Honorable Harry S. Truman Friday Afternoon, April 17, 2 p.m. Doc. 95, Miscellaneous Historical Documents Collection, Harry S. Truman Library and Museum, Independence, Mo.

49. Harry S. Truman to William B. Arthur, Look, June 10, 1964, in Compromised: Clinton, Bush, and the CIA, by Terry Reed and John Cummings (New York: S.P.I. Books, 1994), p. ii..

50. Ray McGovern, “Are Presidents Afraid of the CIA?,” December 29, 2009, Common Dreams (Common-Dreams.org); Ray McGovern, interview by the author, February 26, 2011.

51. Leo Damore stated that he had talked with William Walton and that Walton confirmed Mary had come to him grief-stricken after President Kennedy’s assassination, though there was no tape of any recorded interview or notes in any of Damore’s research. The discreet Walton may have insisted that their interview not be recorded.

52. Interview with William Walton, box 56 (folder 4) and box 96 (folder 9), Papers of Clay Blair, Jr., American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

53. Walton, interview.

54. Ibid.

55. Buehler, Frances, interview by the author, Woods Hole, Mass., June 5, 2006; Walton, interview.

56. Talbot., Brothers, pp. 25–34.

57. Aleksandr Fursenko and Timothy J. Naftali, One Hell of a Gamble: Khrushchev, Castro, and Kennedy, 1958–1964 (New York: W. W. Norton, 1998), p. 345.

58. Ibid.

59. Talbot, Brothers, p. 8.

60. Walton, interview.

61. Ibid.

62. Ibid.

63. Evelyn Lincoln, Kennedy and Johnson (New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1968), pp. 204–205.

64. James Wagenvoord, interview by the author, January 9, 2011.

65. James Wagenvoord profile, Spartacus Educational, November 3, 2009. www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKwagenvoord.htm. In addition, James Wagenvoord, interview by the author, January 9, 2011.

66. James Wagenvoord, interview by the author, January 9, 2011.

67. Ibid.

68. Ibid.

69. John M. Newman, JFK and Vietnam: Deception, Intrigue, and the Struggle for Power (New York: Warner, 1992), pp. 446–447.

70. Tom Wicker, JFK and LBJ: The Influence of Personality Upon Politics (New York: William Morrow, 1968), p. 185.

71. Stanley Karnow, Vietnam: A History (New York: Viking, 1983), p. 326. Karnow has always been convinced of this quote’s accuracy, having heard it from General Harold K. Johnson, then the Army chief of staff, who was in attendance at the White House Christmas Eve meeting with President Johnson.

72. Talbot, Brothers, p. 219.

73. Ziad Obermeyer, Christopher J. L. Murray, and Emmanuela Gakidou, “Fifty Years of Violent War Deaths from Vietnam to Bosnia: Analysis of Data from World Health Survey Programme,” British Medical Journal 336, no. 28 (June 2008). The method used by the authors indicated that 3.8 million Vietnamese died in the protracted fighting in Vietnam, mostly from 1955 to 1975, compared to previous estimates cited by the researchers of 2.1 million.

74. Robert Dallek, Lyndon B. Johnson: Portrait of a President (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 2005), p. 315.

75. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 226.

76. Ibid., pp. 124–125, p. 204.

77. Toni Shimon, interview by the author, Long Island, N.Y., February 15, 2007.

78. Leo Damore, interviews by the author, Centerbrook, Conn., February 1992 and April 1993.

79. Robert D. Morrow, First Hand Knowledge: How I Participated in the CIA-Mafia Murder of President Kennedy (New York: S.P.I. Books, 1992), pp. 274–280.

80. Talbot, Brothers, p. 18.

81. Morrow. First Hand Knowledge, pp. 279–280.

82. Burleigh, A Very Private Woman, p. 292.

83. John Williams, interview by the author, February 2, 2004.

84. Ibid.; In addition, John Williams, interviews by the author, May 18, 2007, and November 16, 2009; Jeanne (“Hap”) Morrow, interview by the author, January 28, 2004.

85. Williams, interview, May 18, 2007. Jeanne (“Hap”) Morrow, interview by the author, January 28, 2004.

86. Williams, interviews, May 18, 2007.

87. Ibid.

Chapter 12. How it went down: The Anatomy of a CIA Assassination – Part I

1. Katie McCabe and Dovey Johnson Roundtree, Justice Older Than the Law: The Life of Dovey Johnson Roundtree (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2009). p. 191.

2. Trial transcript, United States of America v. Ray Crump, Jr., Defendant, Criminal Case No. 930-64, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C., July 20, 1965, p. 211.

3.  Ibid., p. 178.

4. Ibid., pp. 136–137.

5. Ibid., p. 137.

6. Henry Wiggins, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., April 2, 1992.

7. Ibid.

8. Trial transcript, pp. 658–659.

9. Ibid., pp. 657–659.

10. Department of Defense Telephone Directory, Fall 1964, Area Code 202 Dial Oxford Plus Extension Number or Liberty 5-6700 • Interdepartmental Code II, p. 91. This particular directory was part of Leo Damore’s material and research. All past Defense Department directories can located at the Library of Congress.

11. Roberta Hornig, “Teacher Says He Passed by Mrs. Meyer,” Washington Star, July 27, 1965.

12. David MacMichael, interview by the author, June 22, 2004. Leo Damore interviewed Mr. MacMichael repeatedly during 1992.

13. Donald E. Deneselya, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., May 29, 2007; Victor Marchetti, interview by the author, Leesburg, Va., October 4, 2007.

14. As of 2011, Roger Charles is coauthoring a book with Andrew Gumbel about Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995, entitled Oaklahoma City: What the Investigation Missed and Why It Still Matters (William Morrow, 2012).

15. Roger Charles, interview by the author, June 10, 2005.

16. Confidential written interview notes from author H. P. Albarelli Jr. dated September 2001 and faxed to the author on February 11, 2010.

17. H. P. Albarelli Jr., communications by email and telephone with the author, February 12, 2010.

18. Ibid.; personal communications between H. P. Albarelli Jr. and his confidential source on February 12 and 13, 2010, as reported to the author via Albarelli’s emails and follow-up telephone conversations.

19. Timothy Leary, interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., November 7, 1990.

20. Hilaire du Berrier, Background to Betrayal: The Tragedy of Vietnam (Appleton, Wis.: Western Islands, 1965), p. 143. Du Berrier documents that Bernie Yoh did “public relations” work for the president of South Vietnam, writing that “Bernie Yoh was the stooge to fly back and forth between Washington and Saigon; to Saigon so he could say he had been there, then back to America to tell editors, women’s clubs and congressmen, ‘Don’t believe what you hear. I have just come from Vietnam. I have been in the jungles with the guerillas, killing Communists, and we are winning. You are not going to desert Vietnam as you did my country, are you?” Author David Martin said, however, that “Yoh denied to me that he had ever worked for the CIA, saying that he thought they were too stupid for him to have anything to do with them, but he had lectured to the U.S. Air War College on a subject in which he claimed world-class expertise, psychological warfare.” See David Martin, “Spook Journalist Goulden,” August 11, 1998, DC Dave’s, www.dcdave.com/article1/081198.html.

21. Bernie Yoh, telephone interview by Leo Damore, Washington, D.C., October 30, 1990. Damore wrote two pages of typewritten notes on the call. It’s not known whether Damore taped the telephone interview.

22. Leo Damore, to his attorney, James H. Smith, on the morning of March 31, 1993. The exact date of Damore’s communication with Prouty is not known. See Appendix 3.

23. L. Fletcher. Prouty, The Secret Team: The CIA and Its Allies in Control of the United States and the World (Costa Mesa, Calif.: Institute for Historical Review, 1973), Passim. Prouty’s duties at the Pentagon were to provide the CIA with the military resources needed to carry out its clandestine operations. He created a secret, well-trained network of agents throughout the military service sectors and U.S. government agencies, including the FBI and the FAA, and inside various foreign governments.

24. James H. Smith, Esq., interview by the author, April 7, 2004.

25. Leo Damore stated to this author on several occasions starting in 1992 that Mary Meyer had bought a paperback copy of the Warren Commission’s report when it first went on sale in September 1964.

26. Ibid. See also Appendix 3.

27. Leo Damore interview by the author, Centerbrook, Conn., April 1993.

28. See Appendix 3.

29. Prouty, Secret Team, p. 141, p. 268, pp. 335–336, p. 418.

30. Albarelli, confidential written interview notes.

31. Smith, interview. See also page 2 of Appendix 3.

32. Ibid. See also page 6 of Appendix 3.

33. 33 See page 3 of Appendix 3.

34. Richard Pine, interview by the author, October 21, 2004.

35. Mark O’Blazney, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., November 27, 2008.

36. Smith, interview. See also pages 46 in Appendix 3.

37. Joseph J. Trento, The Secret History of the CIA (Roseville, Calif.: Prima, 2001), p. 89. Nowhere is the capacity of the CIA’s Technical Services Division better explained than in H. P. Albarelli Jr.’s book A Terrible Mistake: The Murder of Frank Olson and the CIA’s Secret Cold War Experiments (Walterville, Ore.: Trine Day, 2009).

38. McCabe and Roundtree, Justice Older Than the Law, p. 195. See also trial transcript, p. 493. Crump’s neighbor, Elsie Perkins, testified that she saw Crump leave his house that morning “between five minutes of eight and eight o’clock.”

39. Trial transcript, p. 140.

40. Ibid., pp. 129–130.

41. McCabe and Roundtree., Justice Older Than the Law, p. 195.

42. Ibid., pp. 195–196.

43. Trial transcript, p. 134.

44. Ibid., p. 259.

45. Ibid., p. 661.

46. Ibid., p. 425.

47. Ibid., p. 569.

48. Ibid., pp. 407–408.

49. Ibid., p. 608, p. 649.

50. Benjamin C. Bradlee, A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995), p. 266.

51. In passing, Bradlee did reference Wistar Janney earlier in his memoir (p. 118), but the page reference was not part of Wistar Janney’s heading in the index of the Bradlee memoir. The passage read as follows: “Socially our crowd consisted of young couples, around thirty years old, with young kids, being raised without help by their mothers, and without many financial resources. The Janneys—Mary and Wistar, who worked for the CIA; the Winships—Leibe and Tom who worked for Senator Lev Saltonstall of Massachusetts …”

52. Ben Bradlee, interview by the author, Washington, D.C. January 31, 2007.

53. Trial transcript, p. 608, p. 649.

54. Christopher Janney, interview by the author, February 20, 2010.

55. Bradlee, Good Life, p. 143.

Chapter 13. How it went down: The Anatomy of a CIA Assassination – Part II

1. John M. Newman, “James Jesus Angleton and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy” (lecture, “Cracking the JFK Case,” symposium sponsored by the Assassination Archives and Research Center, Washington, D.C., November 19, 2005).

2. Cord Meyer Jr., Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA (New York: Harper & Row, 1980), pp.143-144.

3. C. David Heymann, The Georgetown Ladies’ Social Club (New York: Atria Books, 2003), p. 167.

4. Carol Delaney, telephone communication with the author. February 22, 2010.

5. Heymann, Georgetown Ladies’ Social Club, p. 168.

6. The most recent criticism of author C. David Heymann’s journalistic credibility has come from researcher Lisa Pease. See her review of Heymann’s book Bobby and Jackie: A Love Story (2009) at Citizens for Truth about the Kennedy Assassination, www.ctka.net/reviews/heymann.html.

7. C. David Heymann, interview by the author, New York, N.Y., March 18, 2005.

8. C. David Heymann, voice mail left on the author’s home telephone, March 9, 2007.

9.  David Wise, Molehunt: The Secret Search for Traitors That Shattered the CIA (New York: Random House, 1992), p. 38.

10. Ibid., p. 293.

11. Zack Corson (son of Bill Corson), interview by the author. New York, N.Y., October 25, 2007.

12. Joseph J. Trento, The Secret History of the CIA (Roseville, Calif.: Prima, 2001), p. xiii.

13. Ibid.

14. J. Michael Kelly, interviews by the author, March 9, 2004, and April 12, 2007. Mike Kelly and Tom Kimmel were classmates at Annapolis. Roger Charles, who became the executor of Bill Corson’s estate, was in the class behind them. All three were mentored by Bill Corson when he taught at the U.S. Naval Academy.

15. J. Michael Kelly, interview by the author, March 9, 2004.

16. Both Roger Charles and Tom Kimmel recalled and confirmed the accuracy of this event. Roger Charles, interview by the author, April 13, 2007; Thomas K. Kimmel, interview by the author, May 14, 2007.

17. Plato Cacheris, Esq., interview by the author, Washington, D.C., April 27, 2007.

18. Roger Charles, email communication with the author, December 5, 2007.

19. Gregory Douglas, Gestapo Chief: The 1948 Interrogation of Heinrich Müller, vol. 2 (San Jose, Calif.: R. James Bender Publishing, 1997), p. 5.

20. Emily Crowley, interview by the author, March 24, 2007; Thomas K. Kimmel, interview by the author, March 13, 2007. In a telephone conversation in early 2011, Philip Kushner, a lecturer in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Texas, also told the author that he had talked with Bob Crowley’s wife, Emily, and she had verified her late husband’s telephone relationship with Gregory Douglas.

21. “Gregory Douglas” (Peter Stahl), interview by the author, Aurora, Ill., April 10, 2007.

22. Emily Crowley, interview.

23. Kimmel, interview, March 13, 2007.

24. Ibid.; Thomas K. Kimmel, interview by the author, November 20, 2008.

25. Emily Crowley, interview.

26. Transcription of alleged tape-recorded telephone conversation between Robert Crowley and Gregory Douglas, January 27, 1996.

27. Transcription of alleged Crowley-Douglas conversation, April 2, 1996.

28. David Acheson, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., December 10, 2008.

29. Charles Bartlett, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., December 10, 2008.

30. James H. Smith, Esq., interview by the author, April 7, 2004, quoting from pages 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6 of his notes on his March 31, 1993, conversation with Leo Damore. See Appendix 3.

31. Crowley-Douglas conversation, January 27, 1996.

32. Robert L. Morrow, First Hand Knowledge: How I Participated in the CIAMafia Murder of President Kennedy (New York: S.P.I. Books, 1992), p. 277.

33. John Williams, interviews by the author, May 18, 2007, and November 16, 2009; Jeanne Morrow, personal communication with the author, January 28, 2004.

34. During the author’s three-year association with Leo Damore starting in 1992, Damore mentioned O’Donnell’s comments on this matter repeatedly. Damore’s former wife, June Davison, also remembered Leo discussing O’Donnell’s statement with her, as did Damore’s attorney, James H. Smith, Esq.

35. Email communication from Gregory Douglas to Joseph Trento,, November 19, 2001, given to the author by Gregory Douglas.

36. Email communication from Joseph Trento to Gregory Douglas, November 3, 2002, given to the author by Gregory Douglas.

37. The Operation Zipper file appears prominently in Gregory Douglas’s Regicide: The Official Assassination of John F. Kennedy (Huntsville, Ala.: Monte Sano Media, 2002.

38. There are two excellent sources for how the CIA, and particularly James Jesus Angleton, controlled Lee Harvey Oswald, starting with his fake defection to Russia in 1959: John Newman, Oswald and the CIA (1995; repr., New York: Skyhorse, 2008), pp. 613–637; James W. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2008), pp. 75–84.

39. In John Newman’s latest edition of Oswald and the CIA (pp. 613–637), the author included a new chapter entitled “Epilogue, 2008:—The Plot to Murder President Kennedy; A New Interpretation.” Here, as a result of records made available through of the passage of the 1993 JFK Records Act, historian Newman sheds light “on the nature and design of the plot and the national security cover-up that followed.” He continues: In my view, whoever Oswald’s direct handler or handlers were, we must now seriously consider the possibility that [James Jesus] Angleton was probably their general manager. No one else in the Agency had the access, the authority, and the diabolically ingenious mind to manage this sophisticated plot. No one had the means necessary to plant the WWIII virus in Oswald’s files and keep it dormant for six weeks until the president’s assassination. Whoever those who were ultimately responsible for the decision to kill Kennedy were, their reach extended into the national intelligence apparatus to such a degree that they could call upon a person who knew its inner secrets and workings so well that he could design a failsafe mechanism into the fabric of the plot. The only person who could ensure that a national security cover-up of an apparent counterintelligence nightmare was the head of counterintelligence (p. 637).

40. Email communication from Gregory Douglas to Joseph Trento, November 3, 2002, given to the author by Gregory Douglas.

41. Deborah Davis, Katharine the Great: Katharine Graham and Her Washington Post Empire (New York: Sheridan Square Press, 1991), p. 304. See also Appendix 4.

42. Davis, Katharine the Great (1991), p. 286. See also Appendix 4.

43. “An Interview with Deborah Davis,” in Popular Alienation: A Steamshovel Press Reader, ed. Kenn Thomas (Lilburn, Ga.: IllumiNet Press, 1995), pp. 79–81.

44. Benjamin C. Bradlee, A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995), 267.

45. Ron Rosenbaum and Phillip Nobile, “The Curious Aftermath of JFK’s Best and Brightest Affair,” New Times, July 9, 1976, p. 29.

46. Ben Bradlee, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., January 31, 2007.

47. Bradlee, Good Life, p. 266.

48. Gabe Torres, interview by the author, Washington, D.C., April 22, 2010. As a chief consultant for this production, I had purposely not been present during the filming of Bradlee’s segment, but conferred with Torres afterward. Torres had been made aware of the Wistar Janney phone call, however.

49. Trial transcript, United States of America v. Ray Crump, Jr., Defendant, Criminal Case No. 930-64, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C., July 20, 1965, p. 47.

50. Bradlee, Good Life, pp. 274–283.

51. Rosenbaum and Nobile, “Curious Aftermath,” p. 32.

52. Bradlee, Good Life, p. 266.

53. Ibid.

54. Nancy Pittman Pinchot, interview by the author, December 2, 2008.

55. Antoinette Bradlee letter to Leo Damore, dated July 29, 1991.

56. Betsy Karasik, “Anne Chamberlin: A life to emulate,” Washington Post, January 6, 2012.

57. John Newman, personal communication with the author, Harrisonburg, Va., April 29, 2004.

58. Ron Rosenbaum, The Secret Parts of Fortune: Three Decades of Intense Investigations and Edgy Enthusiasms (New York: Random House, 2000), pp. 503–504.

59. David Philips, The Night Watch (New York: Atheneum, 1977), p. 189.

60. Nowhere is this thesis more carefully and thoroughly researched than in the most recent edition of John Newman’s Oswald and the CIA (1995; repr., New York: Skyhorse, 2008). See “Epilogue, 2008: The Plot to Murder President Kennedy; A New Interpretation,” pp. 613–637.

61. Tom Mangold, Cold Warrior: James Jesus Angleton; The CIA’s Master Spy Hunter (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1991), p. 30, p. 358n1.

62. Trento, Secret History, p. 280.

63. Ibid., p. 479.

64. Ibid., pp. 478–479.

65. Ibid.

66. Rosenbaum, Secret Parts of Fortune, p. 143.

67. Ibid., pp. 141–143.

Chapter 14. Epilogue

1. William E. Colby, testimony, U.S. Senate, September 16, 1975, Hearings Before the Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, vol. 1, pp. 16–17. During the Church Committee’s Senate investigations in 1975, CIA director William Colby presented to committee chairman Frank Church a pistol resembling a.45-caliber automatic equipped with a telescopic sight. Time magazine reported that “the gun fires a toxin-tipped dart, almost silently and accurately up to 250 ft. Moreover, the dart is so tiny—the width of a human hair and a quarter of an inch long—as to be almost undetectable, and the poison leaves no trace in a victim’s body.” Senator Church referred to the pistol as follows: “As a murder instrument, that’s about as efficient as you can get, is it not?” To which Colby’s response was, “It’s a weapon, a very serious weapon.” Time further revealed “the agency has also developed two other dart-launching pistols, as well as a fountain pen that can fire deadly darts and an automobile engine-head bolt that releases a toxic substance when heated.”

2. Joseph Trento, The Secret History of The CIA (Roseville, Ca: Prima Publishing, 2001), p. 89.

3. Nina Burleigh, A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer (New York: Bantam, 1998), p. 133.

4. Toni Shimon, interviews by the author, June 17, 2004, February 15, 2007, and January 7, 2008.

5. Ibid., February 15, 2007.

6. Anthony Summers, The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover (London: Victor Gollancz, 1993), pp. 81–84. Joseph Shimon’s professional life is well documented in this book.

7. Shimon, interview, February 15, 2007.

8. Jim Marrs, Crossfire: The Plot That Killed Kennedy (New York: Carroll & Graf, 1989), pp. 558–566.

9. Shimon, interviews, February 15, 2007, and January 7, 2008.

10. Jack Anderson and Joseph Spear, “Witness Tells of CIA Plot to Kill Castro,” Washington Post, November 1, 1988.

11. Shimon, interview, January 7, 2008.

12. Anderson and Spear, “Witness Tells of CIA Plot,” C19.

13. Ibid.

14. Shimon, interview, February 15, 2007.

15. Ibid.

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