Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. James Madison writing in The Federalist, 19 (8 Dec. 1787), in E. H. Scott (ed.), The Federalist and Other Constitutional Papers by Hamilton, Jay, Madison (Chicago, 1898), pp.103–8 at 105. For a critical reading, see Helmut Neuhaus, ‘The federal principle and the Holy Roman Empire’, in Hermann Wellenreuther (ed.), German and American Constitutional Thought (New York, 1990), pp.27–49. For a more positive comparison between the Empire and the US, see also W. Burgdorf, ‘Amerikaner schreiben ihre Verfassung von den Deutschen ab’, Focus- Online (23 May 2014), http://www.focus.de/wissen/experten/burgdorf (accessed 27 June 2014).

2. S. Pufendorf, Die Verfassung des deutschen Reiches [1667], ed. Horst Denzer (2nd ed. Stuttgart, 1994). Madison had clearly read this, referring to ‘the deformities of this political monster’: Scott (ed.), The Federalist, p.106. Voltaire’s comments appeared in 1761 in his Essai sur les moeurs et l’esprit des nations, ed. R. Pomeau (Paris, 1963), I, p.683.

3. B. Schneidmüller, ‘Konsens – Territorialisierung – Eigennutz. Vom Umgang mit spätmittelalterlicher Geschichte’, FMS, 39 (2005), 225–46 at 236–8. For recent examples of its persistence, see H. A. Winkler, Germany: The Long Road West (2 vols., Oxford, 2006–7), and H. Myers, Medieval Kingship (Chicago,1982), pp.120–21. For further discussion, see E. Wolgast, ‘Die Sicht des Alten Reiches bei Treitschke und Erdmannsdörffer’, in M. Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum – irregulare corpus – Teutscher Reichs-Staat (Mainz, 2002), pp.169–88.

4. Again, this view is deeply entrenched in the general and specialist literature: H. Plessner, Die verspätete Nation (Stuttgart, 1959); F. Meinecke, Weltbürgertum und Nationalstaat (Munich, 1908). The term ‘consolation prize’ comes from Len Scales’ insightful essay ‘Late medieval Germany: An under-Stated nation?’, in L. Scales and O. Zimmer (eds.), Power and the Nation in European History (Cambridge, 2005), pp.166–91 at 167.

5. An influential example of this approach is G. Barraclough, The Origins of Modern Germany (Oxford, 1946). Further discussion in W. W. Hagen, German History in Modern Times (Cambridge, 2012), pp.6–20, and his ‘Descent of the Sonderweg: Hans Rosenberg’s history of old-regime Prussia’, CEH, 24 (1991), 24–50; T. Reuter, ‘The origins of the German Sonderweg? The Empire and its rulers in the high Middle Ages’, in A. J. Duggan (ed.), Kings and Kingship in Medieval Europe (London, 1993), pp.179–211.

6. F. Frensdorff, ‘Reich und Reichstag. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der deutschen Rechtssprache’, Hansische Geschichtsblätter, 16 (1910), 1–43; E. Schubert, König und Reich (Göttingen, 1979), pp.245–54.

7. The literature on this is appropriately imperial in scope. Useful contributions include: H. Münkler, Empires: The Logic of World Domination from Ancient Rome to the United States (Cambridge, 2007); S. N. Eisenstadt, The Political Systems of Empires (Glencoe, IL, 1963); J. Burbank and F. Cooper, Empires in World History (Princeton, 2010), pp.1–22.

8. For example, at 1.2 million square kilometres, Charlemagne’s original empire just makes it into one influential list of empires, but thereafter the Empire disappears from the list by falling below the arbitrary threshold of 1 million square kilometres minimum: P. Turchin, ‘A theory for formation of large empires’, Journal of Global History, 4 (2009), 191–217.

9. M. W. Doyle, Empires (Ithaca, 1986).

10. E.g. N. Ferguson, Empire: How Britain Made the Modern World (London, 2003). For a critique, see D. H. Nexon and T. Wright, ‘What’s at stake in the American empire debate’, American Political Science Review, 101 (2007), 253–71.

11. E.g. M. Mazower, Hitler’s Empire: Nazi Rule in Occupied Europe (London, 2008).

12. D. H. Nexon, The Struggle for Power in Early Modern Europe (Princeton, 2009); A. J. Motyl, ‘Thinking about empire’, in K. Barkey and M. von Hagen (eds.), After Empire: Multiethnic Societies and Nation-building (Boulder, CO, 1997), pp.19–29; S. Kettering, ‘The historical development of political clientelism’, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 18 (1988), 419–47.

13. I owe this insight to Johannes Burkhardt’s stimulating essay ‘Die Friedlosigkeit der frühen Neuzeit’, ZHF, 24 (1997), 509–74.

14. Münkler, Empires, p.85.

15. Historical periodization is yet another contested field. For convenience, this work uses the convention that late antiquity lasted into the mid-seventh century, followed by the early Middle Ages to about 1000, the high Middle Ages until around 1200, the late Middle Ages to around 1400, and then ‘early modernity’ into the late eighteenth century.

16. B. Bowden, The Empire of Civilisation (Chicago, 2009).

17. Cited from H. H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills (eds.), From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (London, 1948), p.78. Useful further discussion is in S. Reynolds, ‘There were states in medieval Europe’, Journal of Historical Sociology, 16 (2003), 550–55.

18. Notable examples include S. Rokkan, State Formation, Nation-Building, and Mass Politics in Europe (Oxford, 1999), pp.209–11; G. Benecke, Society and Politics in Germany, 1500–1750 (London, 1974); G. Schmidt, Geschichte des Alten Reiches. Staat und Nation in der Frühen Neuzeit 1495–1806 (Munich, 1999); M. Umbach (ed.),German Federalism (Basingstoke, 2002); J. Whaley, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, 1493–1806 (2 vols., Oxford, 2012). Critique in A. Kohler, ‘Das Heilige Römische Reich – ein Föderativsystem?’, in T. Fröschl (ed.), Föderationsmodelle und Unionsstrukturen (Munich, 1994), pp.119–26. For the discussion of federal ideas by early modern writers, see H. H. F. Eulau, ‘Theories of federalism under the Holy Roman Empire’, American Political Science Review, 35 (1941), 643–64.

19. Scott (ed.), The Federalist, p.106.

20. R. L. Watts, Comparing Federal Systems (2nd ed., Montreal, 1999), esp. pp.6–9. For the following, see also the extremely interesting comparison of the Empire and the US by R. C. Binkley, ‘The Holy Roman Empire versus the United States’, in C. Read (ed.), The Constitution Reconsidered (2nd ed., New York, 1968), pp.271–84.

21. Much of this literature is cited in Chapter 7. See also Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger’s introduction to her (ed.), Vormoderne politische Verfahren (Berlin, 2001), pp.11–23; K. Rohe, ‘Politische Kultur und ihre Analyse’, HZ, 250 (1990), 321–46.

22. B. Schneidmüller, ‘Konsensuale Herrschaft’, in P.-J. Heinig et al. (eds.), Reich, Regionen und Europain in Mittelalter und Neuzeit (Berlin, 2000), pp.53–87, and his ‘Zwischen Gott und den Getreuen. Vier Skizzen zu den Fundamenten der mittelalterlichen Monarchie’, FMS, 36 (2002), 193–224; G. Althoff, Die Macht der Rituale: Symbolik und Herrschaft im Mittelalter (Darmstadt, 2003).

23. C. Tilly, ‘How empires end’, in Barkey and von Hagen (eds.), After Empire, pp.1–11 at 4. Here, the Empire is similar to other empires, for example China, where the effectiveness of the imperial authority ‘depended on the minimization of formal governmental intervention in the affairs of local communities’: R. A. Kapp, Szechwan and the Chinese Republic: Provincial Militarism and Central Power, 1911–1938 (New Haven, CT, 1973), p.2.

24. K. Epstein, The Genesis of German Conservatism (Princeton, 1966); L. Krieger, The German Idea of Freedom (Chicago, 1957); P. Blickle, Obedient Germans? A Rebuttal (Charlottesville, VA, 1997).

25. A. Lüdtke, Police and State in Prussia, 1815–1850 (Cambridge, 1989); H.-U. Wehler, Deutsche Gesellschaftsgeschichte (5 vols., Munich, 2008). Further discussion in D. Langewiesche, Liberalism in Germany (Basingstoke, 2000).

26. K. H. Wegert, German Radicals Confront the Common People: Revolutionary Politics and Popular Politics, 1789–1849 (Mainz, 1992).

27. As claimed by P. C. Hartmann, Das Heilige Römische Reich deutscher Nation in der Neuzeit 1486–1806 (Stuttgart, 2005), esp. pp.163–4. Further discussion of this point on pp.680–86.

28. B. M. Bedos-Rezak, ‘Medieval identity: A sign and a concept’, AHR, 105 (2000), 1489–533.

29. Some have interpreted this as the origins of ‘spin’: A. Wakefield, The Disordered Police State: German Cameralism as Science and Practice (Chicago, 2009), pp.9–13, 136–8. See more generally A. Gestrich, Absolutismus und Öffentlichkeit. Politische Kommunikation in Deutschland zu beginn des 18. Jahrhunderts (Göttingen, 1994), pp.34–56.

CHAPTER 1: TWO SWORDS

1. G. Koch, Auf dem Wege zum Sacrum Imperium. Studien zur ideologischen Herrschaftsbegründung der deutschen Zentralgewalt im 11. und 12. Jahrhundert (Vienna, 1972), p.273; E. Müller-Mertens, ‘Imperium und Regnum im Verhältnis zwischen Wormser Konkordat und Goldener Bulle’, HZ, 284 (2007), 561–95 at 573–5. For the various titles and their use, see H. Weisert, ‘Der Reichstitel bis 1806’, Archiv für Diplomatik, 40 (1994), 441–513.

2. P. Heather, The Goths (Oxford, 1996).

3. M. Todd, The Early Germans (2nd ed., Oxford, 2004), pp.225–38; R. Collins, Early Medieval Europe, 300–1000 (Basingstoke, 1991).

4. H. J. Mierau, Kaiser und Papst im Mittelalter (Cologne, 2010), pp.26–39.

5. T. F. X. Noble, The Republic of St Peter: The Birth of the Papal State, 680–825 (Philadelphia, 1984). Further discussion of the Patrimonium on pp.189–93.

6. D. A. Bullough, ‘Empire and emperordom from late antiquity to 799’, EME, 12 (2003), 377–87 at 384–5.

7. R. McKitterick, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians (Harlow, 1983), pp.16–76; M. Costambeys et al., The Carolingian World (Cambridge, 2011), pp.31–79.

8. R. Schieffer, Der Karolinger (4th ed., Stuttgart, 2006).

9. A. T. Hack, Das Empfangszeremoniell bei mittelalterlichen Papst-Kaiser-Treffen (Cologne, 1999), pp.409–64.

10. Among the numerous biographies the most useful include R. Collins, Charlemagne (Basingstoke, 1998); M. Becher, Charlemagne (New Haven, CT, 2003); A. Barbero, Karl der Grosse. Vater Europas (Stuttgart, 2007); H. Williams, Emperor of the West: Charlemagne and the Carolingian Empire (London, 2010).

11. R. McKitterick, Charlemagne: The Formation of a European Identity (Cambridge, 2008), esp. pp.103, 378.

12. Collins, Charlemagne, pp.141–50; Costambeys et al., Carolingian World, pp.160–70; Becher, Charlemagne, pp.7–17; R. Folz, The Coronation of Charlemagne (London, 1974).

13. Collins, Early Medieval Europe, p.269.

14. The circumstances were clearly more complex than they are often portrayed in accounts of the Empire’s foundation as simply the pope’s attempt to replace Byzantium with a more reliable partner: e.g. W. Ullmann, ‘Reflections on the medieval Empire’, TRHS, 5th series, 14 (1964), 89–108; J. Muldoon, Empire and Order: The Concept of Empire, 800–1800 (Basingstoke, 1999), pp.64–86.

15. H. Beumann, ‘Nomen imperatoris. Studien zur Kaiseridee Karls des Großen’, HZ, 185 (1958), 515–49.

16. B. Schneidmüller, Die Kaiser des Mittelalters (2nd ed., Munich, 2007), p.30. For the coronation, see Folz, Coronation of Charlemagne, pp.132–50.

17. As argued by H. Mayr-Harting, ‘Charlemagne, the Saxons and the imperial coronation of 800’, EHR, 111 (1996), 1113–33.

18. Collins, Charlemagne, p.148; and his ‘Charlemagne’s imperial coronation and the Annals of Lorsch’, in J. Story (ed.), Charlemagne: Empire and Society (Manchester, 2005), pp.52–70.

19. Bullough, ‘Empire and emperordom’, 385–7; D. van Espelo, ‘A testimony of Carolingian rule? The Codex epistolaris carolinus, its historical context and the meaning of imperium’, EME, 21 (2013), 254–82.

20. J. L. Nelson, ‘Women at the court of Charlemagne: A case of monstrous regiment?’, in J. C. Parsons (ed.), Medieval Queenship (Stroud, 1994), pp.43–61 at 47–9.

21. A good overview of these problems can be found in K. F. Morrison’s introduction to T. E. Mommsen and K. F. Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters of the Eleventh Century (New York, 2000), pp.3–40. For the contemporary understanding of the legal position, see Mierau, Kaiser und Papst, pp.163–220.

22. L. Knabe, Die gelasianische Zweigewaltentheorie bis zum Ende des Investiturstreits (Berlin, 1936); W. Levison , ‘Die mittelalterliche Lehre von den beiden Schwertern’, DA, 9 (1952), 14–42.

23. As acknowledged by Emperor Henry IV in his encyclical to the Empire’s bishops, Whitsun 1076, in Mommsen and Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters, pp.151–4.

24. M. Suchan, Königsherrschaft im Streit. Konfliktaustragung in der Regierungszeit Heinrichs IV. zwischen Gewalt, Gespräch und Schriftlichkeit (Stuttgart, 1997).

25. R. W. Southern, Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages (Harmondsworth, 1970), pp.91–100.

26. J. Schatz, Imperium, Pax et Iustitia. Das Reich–Friedensstiftung zwischen Ordo, Regnum und Staatlichkeit (Berlin, 2000), pp.134–54.

27. The former view is held by C. M. Booker, Past Convictions: The Penance of Louis the Pious and the Decline of the Carolingians (Philadelphia, 2009). The latter by M. de Jong, The Penitential State: Authority and Atonement in the Age of Louis the Pious, 814–840 (Cambridge, 2009).

28. G. Althoff, Die Ottonen. Königsherrschaft ohne Staat (2nd ed., Stuttgart, 2005), p.187.

29. J. Laudage, Die Salier. Das erste deutsche Königshaus (2nd ed., Munich, 2007), pp.34–47.

30. A. Coreth, Pietas Austriaca (West Lafayette, IN, 2004); M. Hengerer, ‘The funerals of the Habsburg emperors in the eighteenth century’, in M. Schaich (ed.), Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in Eighteenth-Century Europe (Oxford, 2007), pp.366–94. See also p.431.

31. E. Boshof, Königtum und Königsherrschaft im 10. und 11. Jahrhundert (3rd ed., Munich, 2010), pp.101–8.

32. Count Otto of Lomello’s account cited by G. Althoff, Otto III (Philadelphia, 2003), p.105. Althoff downplays the penitential aspect of this act. See also J. W. Bernhardt, ‘Concepts and practice of empire in Ottonian Germany (950–1024)’, in B. Weiler and S. MacLean (eds.), Representations of Power in Medieval Germany, 800–1500(Turnhout, 2006), pp.141–63 at 154–8; H. Helbig, ‘Fideles Dei et regis. Zur Bedeutungsent-wicklung von Glaube und Treue im hohen Mittelalter’, AKG, 33 (1951), 275–306. For the Gniezno leg of the trip, see pp.83, 206–7.

33. Henry IV claimed he had been called to kingship by Christ and ruled ‘by the pious ordination of God’: letter to Pope Gregory VII in 1076, in Mommsen and Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters, pp.150–51.

34. H. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft: Organisation und Legitimation königlicher Macht (Darmstadt, 2002), pp.168–71. For the insignia, see pp.267–9.

35. A. Schulte, ‘Deutsche Könige, Kaiser, Päpste als Kanoniker in deutschen und römischen Kirchen’, HJb, 54 (1934), 137–77.

36. Koch, Auf dem Wege, pp.61–99.

37. M. Bloch, The Royal Touch (New York, 1989). The Royal Touch was said to cure scrofula.

38. R. Morrissey, Charlemagne and France: A Thousand Years of Mythology (Notre Dame, IN, 2003), pp.96–7.

39. J. Miethke, ‘Geschichtsprozess und zeitgenössisches Bewusstsein – Die Theorie des monarchischen Papsts im hohen und späteren Mittelalter’, HZ, 226 (1978), 564–99; A. Hof, ‘“Plenitudo potestatis” und “imitatio imperii” zur Zeit Innozenz III.’, Zeitschrift für Kirchengeschichte, 66 (1954/55), 39–71.

40. R. McKitterick (ed.), Carolingian Culture: Emulation and Innovation (Cambridge, 1994); E. E. Stengel, Abhandlungen und Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des Kaisergedanken im Mittelalter (Cologne, 1965), pp.17–30.

41. S. Coupland, ‘Charlemagne’s coinage: Ideology and economy’, in Story (ed.), Charlemagne, pp.211–29.

42. For the transition from late antiquity to the early Middle Ages generally, see C. Wickham, The Inheritance of Rome: A History of Europe from 400 to 1000 (London, 2009). The socio-economic dimension is discussed further on pp.485–98.

43. Todd, Early Germans, pp.233–4.

44. Stengel, Abhandlungen, pp.65–74; Bernhardt, ‘Concepts and practice’, 144–7; J. A. Brundage, ‘Widukind of Corvey and the “non-Roman” imperial idea’, Mediaeval Studies, 22 (1960), 15–26.

45. A good summary of this debate is in Althoff, Otto III, pp.81–9. See also G. Althoff and H. Keller, Heinrich I. und Otto der Grosse. Neubeginn und karolingisches Erbe (Göttingen, 1985).

46. H. A. Myers, Medieval Kingship (Chicago, 1982), pp.9–12, 121–2; Stengel, Abhandlungen, esp. pp.17–30.

47. Koch, Auf dem Wege, pp.128, 230–45, 277–8. The relative balance of elective and hereditary monarchy in the Empire is discussed further on pp.301–5.

48. Koch, Auf dem Wege, pp.200–215; F. Seibt, Karl IV. Ein Kaiser in Europa 1346 bis 1378 (Munich, 1978), pp.207–15.

49. S. Epperlein, ‘Über das romfreie Kaisertum im frühen Mittelalter’, Jahrbuch für Geschichte, 2 (1967), 307–42.

50. S. Weinfurter, The Salian Century (Philadelphia, 1999), pp.27–8.

51. W. Eggert and B. Pätzold, Wir-Gefühl und Regnum Saxonum bei frühmittelalterlichen Geschichtsschreibern (Cologne, 1984); E. Müller-Mertens, Regnum Teutonicum. Aufkommen und Verbreitung der deutschen Reichs- und Königsauffassung im früheren Mittelalter (Vienna, 1970). The title king of the Romans had already been used briefly by Henry II. See also pp.179–200.

52. W. Goez, Translatio imperii. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Geschichts-denkens und der politischen Theorie im Mittelalter und in der frühen Neuzeit (Tübingen, 1958); E. Müller-Mertens, ‘Römisches Reich im Besitz der Deutschen, der König an Stelle des Augustus’, HZ, 282 (2006), 1–58.

53. H. Thomas, ‘Julius Caesar und die Deutschen’, in S. Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich (3 vols., Sigmaringen, 1991), III, pp.245–77.

54. M. Gabriele, An Empire of Memory: The Legend of Charlemagne, the Franks, and Jerusalem before the First Crusade (Oxford, 2011); A. A. Latowsky, Emperor of the World: Charlemagne and the Construction of Imperial Authority, 800–1229 (Ithaca, NY, 2013).

55. B. Töpfer, Das kommende Reich des Friedens. Zur Entwicklung chiliastischer Zukunftshoffnungen im Hochmittelalter (Berlin, 1964); L. Roach, ‘Emperor Otto III and the end of time’, TRHS, 6th series, 23 (2013), 75–102.

56. H. Löwe, ‘Kaisertum und Abendland in ottonischer und frühsalischer Zeit’, HZ, 196 (1963), 529–62 at 547.

57. C. Morris, The Papal Monarchy: The Western Church from 1050 to 1250 (Oxford, 1989), pp.518–26; Schatz, Imperium, pp.198–203.

58. F. Shaw, ‘Friedrich II as the “last emperor”’, GH, 19 (2001), 321–39; P. Munz, Frederick Barbarossa (London, 1969), pp.3–21; J. M. Headley, ‘The Habsburg world empire and the revival of Ghibellinism’, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 7 (1978), 93–127.

59. L. Scales, The Shaping of German Identity: Authority and Crisis, 1245–1414 (Cambridge, 2012), p.210.

60. Muldoon, Empire and Order, pp.18–19; A. Colas, Empire (Cambridge, 2007), esp. pp.7–9, 18–19, 32–3; J. H. Burns, Lordship, Kingship and Empire: The Idea of Monarchy, 1400–1525 (Oxford, 1992), pp.97–100; L. E. Scales, ‘France and the Empire: The viewpoint of Alexander of Roes’, French History, 9 (1995), 394–416. More detail in J. Kirchberg, Kaiseridee und Mission unter den Sachsenkaiser und den ersten Saliern von Otto I. bis Heinrich III. (Berlin, 1934). The challenge of royal sovereignty is explored further on pp.169–76.

61. According to M. Innes, ‘Charlemagne’s will: Piety, politics and the imperial succession’, EHR, 112 (1997), 833–55, Charlemagne had probably envisaged a collegiate style of rule with close relatives sharing power under a common patriarch.

62. J. L. Nelson, The Frankish World, 750–900 (London, 1996), pp.89–98; Costambeys et al., Carolingian World, pp.208–13.

63. C. Brühl, Deutschland – Frankreich. Die Geburt zweier Völker (Cologne, 1990), pp.359–62; F.-R. Erkens, ‘Divisio legitima und unitas imperii. Teilungspraxis und Einheitsstreben bei der Thronfolge im Frankenreich’, DA, 52 (1996), 423–85; W. Brown, ‘The idea of empire in Carolingian Bavaria’, in Weiler and MacLean (eds.),Representations of Power, pp.37–55.

64. E.g. P. Riché, The Carolingians: A Family who Forged Europe (Philadelphia, 1993), p.168; J.-F. Noël, Le Saint-Empire (Paris, 1976), pp.7–11.

65. Schatz, Imperium, pp.33, 55–68, 100–113; W. Blockmans, ‘The fascination of the Empire’, in E. Bussière et al. (eds.), Europa (Antwerp, 2001), pp.51–68 at 54. Further discussion on pp.603–4.

66. G. Claeys, Searching for Utopia: The History of an Idea (London, 2011).

67. This is a particular problem with the otherwise useful work by Schatz, Imperium.

68. Wipo of Burgundy’s chronicle, in Mommsen and Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters, p.82.

69. H.-W. Goetz, ‘Regnum. Zum politischen Denken der Karolingerzeit’, ZSRG GA, 104 (1987), 110–89 at 117–24.

70. E. Karpf, Herrscherlegitimation und Reichsbegriff in der ottonischen Geschichtsschreibung des 10. Jahrhundert (Stuttgart, 1985).

71. Mommsen and Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters, p.72. Dynasticism is discussed further on pp.422–31.

72. T. Zotz, ‘Carolingian tradition and Ottonian-Salian innovation’, in A. J. Duggan (ed.), Kings and Kingship in Medieval Europe (London, 1993), pp.69–100 at 70–71; H. Keller, ‘Die Ottonen und Karl der Große’, FMS, 34 (2000), 112–31; M. Gabriele and J. Stuckey (eds.), The Legend of Charlemagne in the Middle Ages (Basingstoke, 2008).

73. P. Classen, ‘Corona imperii. Die Krone als Inbegriff des römisch-deutschen Reiches im 12. Jahrhundert’, in P. Classen and P. Scheibert (eds.), Festschrift für Percy Ernst Schramm (2 vols., Wiesbaden, 1964), I, pp.90–101. See pp.267–8 for the imperial crown.

74. Mommsen and Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters, p.73. Though this famous passage was penned by Wipo, it nonetheless reflected Conrad’s own thinking: H. Wolfram, Conrad II, 990–1039 (University Park, PA, 2006), pp.324–6.

75. J. Petersohn, ‘Rom und der Reichstitel “Sacrum Romanum Imperium”’, Sitzungsbericht der wissenschaftlichen Gesellschaft an der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, 32 (1994), 71–101; Koch, Auf dem Wege, pp.253–75.

76. H. Conring, New Discourse on the Roman-German Emperor [1641] (Tempe, AZ, 2005).

77. Examples of this range from popular accounts like G. H. Perris, Germany and the German Emperor (London, 1912), p.33, to scholarly works like Myers, Medieval Kingship, pp.120–21, 218–22.

78. This compares to six Greeks, five Syrians, five Romans and one Italian, 654–752: Southern, Western Society and the Church, pp.54, 65.

79. Hack, Das Empfangszeremoniell, pp.605–25.

80. H. Zimmermann, ‘Imperatores Italiae’, in H. Beumann (ed.), Historische Forschungen für Walter Schlesinger (Cologne, 1974), pp.379–99.

81. T. Reuter (ed.), The Annals of Fulda (Manchester, 1992), p.135; Mierau, Kaiser und Papst, pp.53–5.

82. P. Partner, The Lands of St Peter: The Papal State in the Middle Ages and the Early Renaissance (London, 1972), pp.77–102.

83. H. Keller, ‘Entscheidungssituationen und Lernprozesse in der “Anfängen der deutschen Geschichte”. Die “Italien- und Kaiserpolitik” Ottos des Großen’, FMS, 33 (1999), 20–48; H. Zielinski, ‘Der Weg nach Rom: Otto der Große und die Anfänge der ottonischen Italienpolitik’, in W. Hartmann and K. Herkbers (eds.), Die Faszination der Papstgeschichte (Cologne, 2008), pp.97–107.

84. The best contemporary account is F. A. Wright (ed.), The Works of Liudprand of Cremona (London, 1930), pp.215–32. For the events, see T. Reuter, Germany in the Early Middle Ages, c.800–1056 (Harlow, 1991), pp.169–73; M. Becher, Otto der Große. Kaiser und Reich (Munich, 2012), pp.215–30.

85. The Ottonianum is printed in B. H. Hill Jr, Medieval Monarchy in Action: The German Empire from Henry I to Henry IV (London, 1972), pp.149–52. See also H. Zimmermann, ‘Das Privilegium Ottonianum von 962 und seine Problemgeschichte’, MIÖG, supplement 20 (1962), 147–90.

86. Collins, Early Medieval Europe, p.347.

87. Althoff, Die Ottonen, p.123.

88. Althoff, Otto III, pp.61–2, 72–81. The Empire’s judicial practice is discussed on pp.610–37.

89. The latter is argued by Weinfurter, Salian Century, pp.91–6, on the grounds Suitger remained bishop of Bamberg whilst pope. See also G. Frech, ‘Die deutschen Päpste’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier, II, pp.303–32.

90. For the debate whether these changes constitute the ‘first European revolution’, see R. I. Moore, The First European Revolution c.970–1215 (Oxford, 2000); K. Leyser, ‘Am Vorabend der ersten europäischen Revolution’, HZ, 257 (1993), 1–28. The concept is disputed by R. Schieffer, ‘“The papal revolution in law”?’, Bulletin of Medieval Canon Law, new series, 22 (1998), 19–30. For the impact of these changes on the Empire, see pp.488–93, 504–8.

91. C. H. Lawrence, Medieval Monasticism (2nd ed., London, 1989); H. J. Hummer, Politics and Power in Early Medieval Europe: Alsace and the Frankish Realm, 600–1000 (Cambridge, 2005), pp.227–49.

92. J. Howe, Church Reform and Social Change in Eleventh-Century Italy (Philadelphia, 1997); K. G. Cushing, Reform and the Papacy in the Eleventh Century (Manchester, 2005), pp.34–7, 91–5; M. Rubin (ed.), Medieval Christianity in Practice (Princeton, 2009).

93. J. Howe, ‘The nobility’s reform of the medieval church’, AHR, 93 (1988), 317–39; N. Kruppa (ed.), Adlige – Stifter – Mönche. Zum Verhältnis zwischen Klöstern und mittelalterlichem Adel (Göttingen, 2007).

94. More detail on these obligations on pp.333–4.

95. J. Miethke and A. Bühler, Kaiser und Papst im Konflikt (Düsseldorf, 1988), pp.17–23; J. T. Gilchrist, Canon Law in the Age of Reform, 11th–12th Centuries (Aldershot, 1993).

96. J. Laudage, Priesterbild und Reformpapsttum im 11. Jahrhundert (Cologne, 1985).

97. The rules were revised again in 1179, expanding the number of cardinals and establishing the requirement of a two-thirds majority: F. J. Baumgartner, Behind Locked Doors: A History of the Papal Elections (Basingstoke, 2003). See more generally I. S. Robinson, The Papacy, 1073–1198 (Cambridge, 1990); Morris, Papal Monarchy, pp.79–108.

98. D. J. Hay, The Military Leadership of Matilda of Canossa, 1046–1115 (Manchester, 2008); M. K. Spike, Tuscan Countess: The Life and Extraordinary Times of Matilda of Canossa (New York, 2004).

99. The arrival of the Normans is covered in greater depth on pp.191–2.

100. E. Boshof, ‘Das Reich in der Krise. Überlegungen zum Regierungsausgang Heinrichs III.’, HZ, 228 (1979), 265–87. For the regency, see pp.315–16.

101. H. E. J. Cowdrey, Pope Gregory VII, 1073–1085 (Oxford, 1998); G. Tellenbach, Die westliche Kirche vom 10. bis zum frühen 12. Jahrhundert (Göttingen, 1988); W. Hartmann, Der Investiturstreit (3rd ed., Munich, 2007).

102. M. Suchan, ‘Publizistik im Zeitalter Heinrichs IV.’, in K. Hruza (ed.), Propaganda, Kommunikation und Öffentlichkeit (11.–16.Jahrhundert) (Vienna, 2003), pp.29–45, and her Königsherrschaft im Streit   (Stuttgart, 1997); I. S. Robinson, Henry IV of Germany, 1056–1106 (Cambridge, 1999), and his Authority and Resistance in the Investiture Contest: The Polemical Literature of the Late Eleventh Century (Manchester, 1978).

103. The term investiturae controversia dates from 1123: B. Schilling, ‘Ist das Wormser Konkordat überhaupt nicht geschlossen worden?’, DA, 58 (2002), 123–91 at 187–8.

104. R. Schieffer, Die Entstehung des päpstlichen Investiturverbots für den deutschen König (Stuttgart, 1981); H. Keller, ‘Die Investitur’, FMS, 27 (1993), 51–86, and his ‘Ritual, Symbolik und Visualisierung in der Kultur des ottonischen Reiches’, FMS, 35 (2001), 23–59 at 26–7.

105. R. Pauler, Die deutschen Könige und Italien im 14. Jahrhundert von Heinrich VII. bis Karl IV. (Darmstadt, 1997), pp.10–11. For the following, see T. Struve, Salierzeit im Wandel. Zur Geschichte Heinrichs IV. und des Investiturstreites (Cologne, 2006), esp. pp.26, 227–40.

106. J. Eldevik, Episcopal Power and Ecclesiastical Reform in the German Empire: Tithes, Lordship and Community, 950–1150 (Cambridge, 2012), pp.103–255.

107. C. Zey, ‘Im Zentrum des Streits. Mailand und die oberitalienischen Kommunen zwischen regnum und sacerdotium’, in J. Jarnut and M. Wemhoff (eds.), Vom Umbruch zur Erneuerung? (Munich, 2006), pp.595–611; H. Keller, ‘Die soziale und politische Verfassung Mailands in den Angfän-gen des kommunalen Lebens’, HZ, 211 (1970), 34–64. For a contemporary pro-Gregorian account, see I. S. Robinson (ed.), Eleventh-Century Germany: The Swabian Chronicles (Manchester, 2008), pp.132–244. The imperial perspective appears in Mommsen and Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters, pp.108–77.

108. Berthold of Reichenau’s account in Robinson (ed.), Eleventh-Century Germany, p.160. See also S. Weinfurter, Canossa. Die Entzauberung der Welt (Munich, 2006).

109. J. Fried, Canossa. Entlarvung einer Legende (Berlin, 2012); T. Reuter, Medieval Polities and Modern Mentalities (Cambridge, 2006), pp.147–66.

110. Cowdrey, Gregory VII, pp.167–98; I. S. Robinson, ‘Pope Gregory VII, the princes and the Pactum 1077–1080’, EHR, 94 (1979), 721–56.

111. E. Goez, ‘Der Thronerbe als Rivale. König Konrad, Kaiser Heinrichs IV. älterer Sohn’, HJb, 116 (1996), 1–49.

112. G. Althoff, Heinrich IV. (Darmstadt, 2006), pp.213–19, 269–73; Hay, Military Leadership of Matilda, pp.145–6.

113. Details in Morris, Papal Monarchy, pp.154–64; Robinson, The Papacy, pp.421–41; Laudage, Die Salier, pp.98–107.

114. J. Fried, ‘Der Regalienbegriff im 11. und 12. Jahrhundert’, DA, 29 (1973), 450–528.

115. Laudage, Die Salier, p.9; Weinfurter, Canossa, p.207. More cautious assessments in H. Hoffmann, ‘Canossa – eine Wende?’, DA, 66 (2010), 535–68; L. Körntgen, Königsherrschaft und Gottes Gnade. Zu Kontext und Funktion sakraler Vorstellungen in Historiographie und Bildzeugnis-sen der ottonisch-frühsalischen Zeit (Berlin, 2001), pp.435–45.

116. Weinfurter, Salian Century, pp.173–4.

117. R. I. Moore, The Formation of a Persecuting Society: Power and Deviance in Western Europe, 950–1250 (Oxford, 1990); J. A. F. Thomson, The Western Church in the Middle Ages (London, 1998), pp.119–29; Lawrence, Medieval Monasticism, pp.244–70; Morris, Papal Monarchy, pp.339–57, 442–504.

118. M. Kintzinger, ‘Der weiße Reiter. Formen internationaler Politik im Spätmittelalter’, FMS, 37 (2003), 315–53. Frederick I ‘Barbarossa’ reluctantly performed Strator service in 1154, but presented this as a mere compliment to the pope.

119. K. Görich, Die Staufer. Herrscher und Reich (2nd ed., Munich, 2008), p.34.

120. Koch, Auf dem Wege, pp.149–77, 191–9, 248–53; N. Rubinstein, ‘Political rhetoric in the imperial chancery’, Medium Aevum, 14 (1945), 21–43; K. Görich, ‘Die “Ehre des Reichs” (honor imperii)’, in J. Laudage and Y. Leiverkus (eds.), Rittertum und höfische Kultur der Stauferzeit (Cologne, 2006), pp.36–74.

121. K. Görich, Friedrich Barbarossa (Munich, 2011), pp.231, 283. See also F. Opll, Friedrich Barbarossa (4th ed., Darmstadt, 2009); Munz, Frederick Barbarossa.

122. The strategic problems are illuminated by H. Berwinkel, Verwüsten und Belagern. Friedrich Barbarossas Krieg gegen Mailand (1158–1162) (Tübingen, 2007). For the Lombard League, see pp.568–70.

123. P. Csendes, ‘Die Doppelwahl von 1198 und ihre europäischen Dimensionen’, in W. Hechberger and F. Schuller (eds.), Staufer & Welfen (Regensburg, 2009), pp.157–71.

124. Pauler, Die deutschen Könige, pp.12–13, 230–31. See generally J. C. Moore, Pope Innocent III (1160/61–1216) (Notre Dame, IN, 2009).

125. He was murdered by Otto of Wittelsbach in a private feud in June 1208: Görich, Die Staufer, p.85.

126. After a succession of largely negative views, Ernst Kantorowicz offered an overly positive portrayal in The Emperor Frederick the Second, 1194–1250 (London, 1957, first published in German, 1927). Good modern biographies include E. Horst, Friedrich II., der Staufer (5th ed., Düsseldorf, 1986), and the monumental W. Stürner,Friedrich II. (2 vols., Darmstadt, 2009).

127. The final stage is recounted in H. U. Ullrich, Konradin von Hohenstaufen. Die Tragödie von Neapel (Munich, 2004).

128. Schneidmüller, Die Kaiser, p.86.

129. Partner, Lands of St Peter, pp.263–70; D. Matthew, The Norman Kingdom of Sicily (Cambridge, 1992), pp.362–80.

130. Pauler, Die deutschen Könige, pp.13–16; F. Trautz, ‘Die Reichsgewalt in Italien im Spätmittelalter’, Heidelberger Jahrbücher, 7 (1963), 45–81 at 48–50.

131. Pauler, Die deutschen Könige, pp.43–114; W. M. Bowsky, Henry VII in Italy: The Conflict of Empire and City-State, 1310–1313 (Lincoln, NB, 1960). A contemporary account of Henry’s expedition appears in M. Margue et al. (eds.), Der Weg zur Kaiserkrone. Der Romzug von Heinrichs VII. in der Darstellung von Erzbischof Balduins von Trier (Trier, 2009).

132. Bowsky, Henry VII, p.167.

133. F. Baethgen, ‘Der Anspruch des Papsttums auf das Reichsvikariat’, ZSRG KA, 10 (1920), 168–268.

134. J. Miethke, ‘Kaiser und Papst im Spätmittelalter. Zu den Ausgleichsbemü-hungen zwischen Ludwig dem Bayern und der Kurie in Avignon’, ZHF, 10 (1983), 421–46; Mierau, Kaiser und Papst, pp.115–28; Pauler, Die deutschen Könige, pp.117–64.

135. A. Fößel, ‘Die deutsche Tradition von Imperium im späten Mittelalter’, in F. Bosbach and H. Hiery (eds.), Imperium / Empire / Reich (Munich, 1999), pp.17–30; E. L. Wittneben, ‘Lupold von Bebenburg und Wilhelm von Ockham im Dialog über die Rechte am Römischen Reich des Spätmittelalters’, DA, 53 (1997), 567–86.

136. R. Pauler, Die Auseinandersetzungen zwischen Kaiser Karl IV. und den Päpsten (Neuried, 1996).

137. J. Whaley, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire 1493–1806 (2 vols., Cambridge, 2012), I, pp.103, 503.

138. J. M. Levine, ‘Reginald Pecock and Lorenzo Valla on the Donation of Constantine’, Studies in the Renaissance, 20 (1973), 118–43.

139. F. Escher and H. Kühne (eds.), Die Wilsnackfahrt. Ein Wallfahrts- und Kommunikationszentrum Nord- und Mitteleuropas im Spätmittelalter (Frankfurt am Main, 2006).

140. F. Welsh, The Battle for Christendom: The Council of Constance, 1415, and the Struggle to Unite against Islam (London, 2008).

141. Whaley, Germany, I, pp.86–7.

142. W. Zanetti, Der Friedenskaiser. Friedrich III. und seine Zeit, 1440–1493 (Herford, 1985), pp.107–23.

143. E. Meuthen (ed.), Reichstage und Kirche (Göttingen, 1991).

144. J. Hook, The Sack of Rome, 1527 (London, 1972).

145. M. F. Alvarez, Charles V: Elected Emperor and Hereditary Ruler (London, 1975), pp.83–8; H. Kleinschmidt, Charles V: The World Emperor (Stroud, 2004), pp.129–32.

146. G. Kleinheyer, Die kaiserlichen Wahlkapitulationen (Karlsruhe, 1968), pp.72–6; T. Brockmann, Dynastie, Kaiseramt und Konfession. Politik und Ordnungsvorstellungen Ferdinands II. im Dreißigjährigen Krieg (Paderborn, 2011), pp.386–9. A sentence was inserted in 1653 that the emperor had to respect the Peace of Augsburg while protecting the church.

147. R. Staats, Die Reichskrone. Geschichte und Bedeutung eines europäischen Symbols (2nd ed., Kiel, 2008), pp.116–17.

148. T. J. Dandelet, Spanish Rome, 1500–1700 (New Haven, CT, 2001).

149. M. Hengerer, Kaiser Ferdinand III. (1608–1657) (Cologne, 2012), pp. 173–6, 297–8; K. Repgen, Dreißigjähriger Krieg und Westfälischer Friede (Paderborn, 1998), pp.539–61, 597–642; A Koller, Imperator und Pontifex. Forschungen zum Verhältnis von Kaiserhof und römischer Kurie im Zeitalter der Konfessionalisierung (1555–1648)(Münster, 2012), pp.157–210.

150. C. W. Ingrao, In Quest and Crisis: Emperor Joseph I and the Habsburg Monarchy (West Lafayette, IN, 1979), pp.96–121; D. Beales, Joseph II (2 vols., Cambridge, 1987–2009), II, pp.214–38, 353–4.

151. G. F.-H. and J. Berkeley, Italy in the Making (3 vols., Cambridge, 1932–40), vol. III; J. Haslip, Imperial Adventurer: Emperor Maximilian of Mexico and his Empress (London, 1974); M. Stickler, ‘Reichsvorstellungen in Preußen-Deutschland und der Habsburgermonarchie in der Bismarckzeit’, in Bosbach and Hiery (eds.), Imperium, pp.133–54 at 139–40.

CHAPTER 2: CHRISTENDOM

1. D. Hay, Europe: The Emergence of an Idea (2nd ed., Edinburgh, 1968), pp.16–36, 52; B. Guenée, States and Rulers in Later Medieval Europe (Oxford, 1985), pp.1–9; R. Bartlett, The Making of Europe: Conquest, Colonization and Cultural Change, 950–1350 (London, 1993), esp. pp.250–55, 292–314.

2. L. Scales, The Shaping of German Identity (Cambridge, 2012), pp.396, 414–15.

3. The sense of difference is clear from contemporary Christian accounts of Slavic beliefs, e.g. Thietmar of Merseburg, Ottonian Germany: The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg, ed. D. A. Warner (Manchester, 2001), pp.252–4. See also A. Angenendt, Liudger. Missionar – Abt – Bischof im frühen Mittelalter (Münster, 2005), pp.32–46; D. Třeštík, ‘The baptism of the Czech princes in 845 and the Christianization of the Slavs’, in Historica: Historical Sciences in the Czech Republic (Prague, 1995), pp.7–59.

4. K. Barkey, Empire of Difference: The Ottomans in Comparative Perspective (Cambridge, 2008), pp.109–53.

5. S. P. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (London, 1996).

6. J. van Engen, ‘The Christian Middle Ages as an historiographical problem’, AHR, 91 (1986), 519–52.

7. As claimed by R. McKitterick, Charlemagne (Cambridge, 2008), Chapter 5.

8. T. Reuter, ‘Plunder and tribute in the Carolingian empire’, TRHS, 5th series, 35 (1985), 75–94; J. Laudage et al., Die Zeit der Karolinger (Darmstadt, 2006), pp.166–72.

9. R. Collins, Early Medieval Europe, 300–1000 (Basingstoke, 1991), pp.321–2.

10. T. Reuter, ‘Carolingian and Ottonian warfare’, in M. Keen (ed.), Medieval Warfare (Oxford, 1999), pp.13–35 at 31.

11. C. H. Lawrence, Medieval Monasticism (2nd ed., London, 1989), p.71.

12. See the account of Hermann’s friend and biographer, Berthold, in I. S. Robinson (ed.), Eleventh-Century Germany (Manchester, 2008), pp.108–12.

13. M. Innes, ‘Franks and Slavs c.700–1000’, EME, 6 (1997), 201–16; S. Coupland, ‘From poachers to gamekeepers: Scandinavian warlords and Carolingian kings’, EME, 7 (1998), 85–114. See more generally T. Reuter, ‘Charlemagne and the world beyond the Rhine’, in J. Story (ed.), Charlemagne (Manchester, 2005), pp.183–94; M. Costambeys et al., The Carolingian World (Cambridge, 2011), pp.80–153.

14. R. McKitterick, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians (Harlow, 1983), pp.109–24; Lawrence, Medieval Monasticism, pp.22, 74–82.

15. C. I. Hammer Jr, ‘Country churches, clerical inventories and the Carolingian Renaissance in Bavaria’, Church History, 49 (1980), 5–17.

16. I. Wood, The Missionary Life: Saints and the Evangelisation of Europe, 400–1050 (Harlow, 2001).

17. A. Angenendt (ed.), Geschichte des Bistums Münster (5 vols., Münster, 1998), I, pp.131–43.

18. W. Kohl (ed.), Bistum Münster (Berlin, 2000), pp.1–24; H.-J. Weiers, Studien zur Geschichte des Bistums Münster im Mittelalter (Cologne, 1984), pp.3–19. In addition to Angenendt’s biography of Liudger, see also B. Senger, Liudger. Leben und Werk (Münster, 1984); G. Isenberg and R. Rommé (eds.), 805: Liudger wird Bischof (Münster, 2005).

19. G. Althoff, Die Ottonen (2nd ed., Stuttgart, 2005), pp.17–18.

20. For Otto I’s requisitioning of Roman relics to support German missions, see Thietmar of Merseburg, Chronicon, pp.103–4.

21. Althoff, Die Ottonen, p.151. The destruction of the Slav rising is recounted by Thietmar of Merseburg, Chronicon, pp.141–3. For Cotrone see pp.191–345.

22. The political dimensions of this and Hungary’s parallel experience are covered on pp.204–7.

23. C. Stiegemann and M. Wemhoff (eds.), 799: Kunst und Kultur der Karolingerzeit. Karl der Große und Papst Leo III. in Paderborn (3 vols., Mainz, 1999).

24. Bohemia had been assigned since 950 to the bishopric of Regensburg. For Otto’s creation of Magdeburg, see Althoff, Die Ottonen, pp.119–22, 128–33; M. Becher, Otto der Große (Munich, 2012), pp.197–203, 242–5, 252–3.

25. Thietmar of Merseburg, Chronicon, pp.140–42.

26. G. Althoff, Otto III (Philadelphia, 2003), pp.62–5, and his Die Ottonen, pp.179–89, 210–11.

27. R. W. Southern, Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages (Harmondsworth, 1970), p.171; Costambeys et al., Carolingian World, p.172. Most archbishops oversaw four to six bishoprics, except the archbishop of Mainz, whose archdiocese contained 16 bishoprics by the eleventh century.

28. R. Morrissey, Charlemagne and France (Notre Dame, IN, 2003), p.305.

29. J. W. Bernhardt, Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, c.936–1075 (Cambridge, 1993), pp.149–61.

30. H. Lorenz, Werdegang von Stift und Stadt Quedlinburg (Quedlinburg, 1922).

31. I. Wood, ‘Entrusting western Europe to the church, 400–750’, TRHS, 6th series, 23 (2013), 37–74.

32. S. MacLean (ed.), History and Politics in Late Carolingian and Ottonian Europ: The Chronicle of Regino of Prüm and Adalbert of Magdeburg (Manchester, 2009), p.5; W. Rösener, The Peasantry of Europe (Oxford, 1994), p.39; B. H. Hill Jr, Medieval Monarchy in Action (London, 1972), p.164.

33. J. Eldevik, Episcopal Power and Ecclesiastical Reform in the German Empire: Tithes, Lordship and Community, 950–1150 (Cambridge, 2012).

34. Althoff, Die Ottonen, p.235.

35. M. Innes, State and Society in the Early Middle Ages: The Middle Rhine Valley, 400–1000 (Cambridge, 2000), pp.18–30; H. J. Hummer, Politics and Power in Early Medieval Europe: Alsace and the Frankish Realm, 600–1000 (Cambridge, 2005), pp.38–55.

36. F.-R. Erkens, ‘Die Bistumsorganisation in den Diözesen Trier und Köln’, in S. Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich (3 vols., Sigmaringen, 1991), II, pp.267–302; Innes, State and Society, p.43; Hummer, Politics and Power, pp.72–6. See generally S. Reynolds, Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe, 900–1300 (2nd ed., Oxford, 1997), pp.79–90.

37. P. Blickle, Das Alte Europa. Vom Hochmittelalter bis zur Moderne (Munich, 2008), p.92; B. Kümin, The Communal Age in Western Europe, c.1100–1800 (Basingstoke, 2013), pp.51, 55.

38. R. Schieffer, ‘Der ottonische Reichsepiskopat zwischen Königtum und Adel’, FMS, 23 (1989), 291–301; L. Santifaller, Zur Geschichte des ottonisch-salischen Reichskirchensystems (2nd ed., Vienna, 1964).

39. T. Reuter, ‘The “imperial church system” of the Ottonian and Salian rulers: A reconsideration’, Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 33 (1982), 347–74.

40. O. Engels, ‘Das Reich der Salier – Entwicklungslinien’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, III, pp.479–541 at 516–33.

41. H. L. Mikoletzky, Kaiser Heinrich II. und die Kirche (Vienna, 1946), pp.41ff.

42. H. Zielinski, Der Reichsepiskopat in spätottonischer und salischer Zeit (1002–1125) (Stuttgart, 1984), esp. p.243. For the church under the Salians, see also Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, II, and H. Wolfram, Conrad II, 990–1039 (University Park, PA, 2006), pp.249–307. The ministeriales are discussed on pp.347–8.

43. For Meinward, see W. Leesch and P. Schubert, Heimatchronik des Kreises Höxter (Cologne, 1966), p.170. See also Althoff, Die Ottonen, pp.234–5; S. Weinfurter, The Salian Century (Philadelphia, 1999), p.57.

44. Weinfurter, The Salian Century, pp.63–7.

45. S. Weinfurter, ‘Herrschaftslegitimation und Königsautorität im Wandel: Die Salier und ihr Dom zu Speyer’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, I, pp.55–96.

46. G. Jenel, Erzbischof Anno II. von Köln (1056–75) und sein politische Wirken (2 vols., Stuttgart, 1974–5), I, pp.175–95; I. S. Robinson, Henry IV of Germany, 1056–1106 (Cambridge, 1999), pp.43–4.

47. Jenel, Erzbischof Anno, II, pp.303–11.

48. B. Schütte, König Konrad III. und der deutschen Reichsepiskopat (Hamburg, 2004), p.102. For an example of the chapters’ development, see L. G. Duggan, Bishop and Chapter: The Governance of the Bishopric of Speyer to 1552 (New Brunswick, NJ, 1978), pp.11–83, and the discussion on pp.371–2. For France, see J. Bergin, Crown, Church and Episcopate under Louis XIV (New Haven, CT, 2004).

49. K. Zeumer (ed.), Quellensammlung zur Geschichte der deutschen Reichsverfassung in Mittelalter und Neuzeit (Tübingen, 1913), pp.42–4. See also pp.359–60.

50. U. Andermann, ‘Die unsittlichen und disziplinlosen Kanonissen. Ein Topos und seine Hintergründe, aufgezeigt an Beispielen sächsischer Frauenstifte (11.–13. Jh.)’, WZ, 146 (1996), 39–63. For the wider trends, see also pp.356–77.

51. M. Burleigh, Germany Turns Eastwards: A Study of Ostforschung in the Third Reich (Cambridge, 1988). For early colonization, see M. Rady, ‘The German settlement in central and eastern Europe during the high Middle Ages’, in R. Bartlett and K. Schönwälder (eds.), The German Lands and Eastern Europe (London, 1999), pp.11–47.

52. Bartlett, Making of Europe, pp.106–96.

53. K. Blaschke, Bevölkerungsgeschichte von Sachsen bis zur industriellen Revolution (Weimar, 1967), pp.65–6, 70, 77–8.

54. These connections are nicely illustrated in P. R. Magocsi, Historical Atlas of Central Europe (2nd ed., Seattle, 2002), pp.37–41. See also Bartlett, Making of Europe, pp.172–7.

55. Quoted in J. M. Piskorski, ‘The medieval colonization of central Europe as a problem of world history and historiography’, GH, 22 (2004), 323–43 at 340.

56. N. Davies, God’s Playground: A History of Poland (2nd ed., 2 vols., Oxford, 2005), I, pp.64–5; Rösener, The Peasantry, pp.50–52.

57. Scales, German Identity, pp.402–5; Piskorski, ‘Medieval colonization’, p.338.

58. F. Kämpfer, ‘Über den Anteil Osteuropas an der Geschichte des Mittelalters’, in M. Borgolte (ed.), Unaufhebbare Pluralität der Kulturen? (Munich, 2001), p.58.

59. N. Jaspert, ‘Religiöse Institutionen am Niederrhein zum Ende des Mittelalters’, in M. Groten et al. (eds.), Der Jülich-Klevische Erbstreit 1609 (Düsseldorf, 2011), pp.267–88 at 268–76; B. Demel, ‘Der Deutsche Orden und seine Besitzungen im südwestdeutschen Sprachraum vom 13. bis 19. Jahrhundert’, ZWLG, 31 (1972), 16–77. The Templars established a few houses in Saxony and parts of northern Italy. After their suppression in 1312, most of their German possessions were transferred to the Knights of St John.

60. J. Riley-Smith, What Were the Crusades? (3rd ed., Basingstoke, 2002); C. Tyerman, God’s War: A New History of the Crusades (Cambridge, MA, 2006).

61. N. Morton, ‘In subsidium: The declining contribution of Germany and eastern Europe to the crusades to the Holy Land, 1221–91’, GHIL, 33 (2011), 38–66 at 46. See generally E. Christiansen, The Northern Crusades (London, 1997).

62. I. Fonnesberg-Schmidt, The Popes and the Baltic Crusades, 1147–1254 (Leiden, 2007); W. Urban, The Teutonic Knights: A Military History (London, 2003); and the contributions by E. Mugurevics, M. Starnawska, L. Pósán and K. Górski in A. V. Murray (ed.), The North-Eastern Frontiers of Medieval Europe (Farnham, 2014).

63. NTSR, VIII, pp.317–79.

64. R. Kieckhefer, Repression of Heresy in Medieval Germany (Liverpool, 1979), pp.83–96; P. Hilsch, ‘Die Hussitenkriege als spätmittelalterlicher Ketzerkrieg’, in F. Brendle and A. Schindling (eds.), Religionskriege im Alten Reich und in Alteuropa (Münster, 2006), pp.59–69; O. Odložilík, The Hussite King: Bohemia in European Affairs, 1440–1471 (New Brunswick, NJ, 1965). For Utraquism, see Z. V. David, Finding the Middle Way: The Utraquists’ Liberal Challenge to Rome and Luther (Washington DC, 2003).

65. A. Haverkamp, Medieval Germany, 1056–1273 (Oxford, 1988), p.212.

66. E. J. Goldberg, Struggle for Empire: Kingship and Conflict under Louis the German, 817–876 (Ithaca, NY, 2006), p.36.

67. T. Reuter, Germany in the Early Middle Ages, c.800–1056 (Harlow, 1991), p.235.

68. I. Heidrich, ‘Bischöfe und Bischofskirche von Speyer’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, II, pp.187–224 at 205–6; Haverkamp, Medieval Germany, pp.213–15.

69. Quoted in R. Chazan, ‘Emperor Frederick I, the Third Crusade and the Jews’, Viator, 8 (1977), 83–93 at 89.

70. A. Sommerlechner, ‘Das Judenmassaker von Fulda 1235 in der Geschichtsschreibung um Kaiser Friedrich II.’, Römische Historische Mitteilungen, 44 (2002), 121–50; A. Patschovsky, ‘The relationship between the Jews of Germany and the king (11th–14th centuries)’, in A. Haverkamp and H. Vollrath (eds.), England and Germany in the High Middle Ages (Oxford, 1996), pp.193–218 at 201–3.

71. D. P. Bell, Jewish Identity in Early Modern Germany (Aldershot, 2007), p.57; Haverkamp, Medieval Germany, p.343.

72. F. Seibt, Karl IV. Ein Kaiser in Europa 1346 bis 1378 (Munich, 1978), pp. 192–200; J. K. Hoensch, Die Luxemburger (Stuttgart, 2000), pp.132–4.

73. For example in Austria: A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1400–1522 (Vienna, 1996), pp.103–4.

74. Bell, Jewish Identity, p.58.

75. G. Hödl, Albrecht II. Königtum, Reichsregierung und Reichsreform, 1438–1439 (Vienna, 1978), pp.82–99.

76. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, pp.105–7.

77. R. J. W. Evans, Rudolf II and his World (2nd ed., London, 1997), pp.236–42.

78. NTSR, V, part I, 223–9; S. Ehrenpreis et al., ‘Probing the legal history of the Jews in the Holy Roman Empire’, Jahrbuch des Simon-Dubnow-Instituts, 2 (2003), 409–87; H. J. Cohn, ‘Jewish self-governing assemblies in early modern central Europe’, in M. H. de Cruz Coelho and M. M. Tavares Ribeiro (eds.), Parlamentos. A lei, a prática e as representações (Lisbon, 2010), pp.88–95.

79. B. A. Tlusty, The Martial Ethic in Early Modern Germany (Basingstoke, 2011), pp.175–85; S. Westphal, ‘Der Umgang mit kultureller Differenz am Beispiel von Haftbedingungen für Juden in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in A. Gotzmann and S. Wendehorst (eds.), Juden im Recht. Neue Zugänge zur Rechtsgeschichte der Juden im Alten Reich(Berlin, 2007), pp.139–61.

80. R. P. Hsia, ‘The Jews and the emperors’, in C. W. Ingrao (ed.), State and Society in Early Modern Austria (West Lafayette, IN, 1994), pp.71–80 at 76–7. For the new supreme courts, see pp.625–32.

81. The new supreme courts appear to have largely avoided the discriminatory practices that characterized the legal process at the level of individual cities where many Jews lived: M. R. Boes, ‘Jews in the criminal-justice system of early modern Germany’, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 30 (1999), 407–35.

82. C. R. Friedrichs, ‘Politics or pogrom? The Fettmilch uprising in German and Jewish history’, CEH, 19 (1986), 186–228, and his ‘Anti-Jewish politics in early modern Germany: The uprising in Worms, 1613–17’, CEH, 23 (1990), 91–152.

83. Ehrenpreis et al., ‘Probing the legal history’, p.479 n.15; T. Schenk, ‘Reichsgeschichte als Landesgeschichte. Eine Einführung in die Akten des kaiserlichen Reichshofrats’, Westfalen, 90 (2012), 107–61, at 126–7.

84. J. I. Israel, ‘Central European Jewry during the Thirty Years’ War’, CEH, 16 (1983), 3–30; J. P. Spielman, The City and the Crown: Vienna and the Imperial Court, 1600–1740 (West Lafayette, IN, 1993), pp.123–35; A. Rutz, ‘Territoriale Integration durch Bildung und Erziehung?’, in Groten et al. (eds.), Der Jülich-Klevische Erbstreit, pp.337–57 at 344.

85. K. Müller, ‘Das “Reichscamerale” im 18. Jahrhundert’, Wiener Beiträge zur Geschichte der Neuzeit, 20 (1993), 152–77; W. Kohl (ed.), Westfälische Geschichte (3 vols., Düsseldorf, 1983–4), I, pp.655–7.

86. P. C. Hartmann, ‘Bevölkerungszahlen und Konfessionsverhältnisse des Heiligen Römischen Reiches deutscher Nation und der Reichskreise am Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts’, ZHF, 22 (1995), 345–69.

87. K. A. Roider Jr, Austria’s Eastern Question, 1700–1790 (Princeton, 1982), pp.95–9.

88. J. H. Schoeps, ‘“Ein jeder soll vor alle und alle vor ein stehn”. Die Juden-politik in Preußen in der Regierungszeit König Friedrich Wilhelms I.’, in F. Beck and J. Schoeps (eds.), Der Soldatenkönig (Potsdam, 2003), pp.141–60; T. Schenk, ‘Friedrich und die Juden’, in Friederisiko (2 vols., Stiftung Preussische Schlöer und Gärten, 2012), I, pp.160–74.

89. P. H. Wilson, ‘Der Favorit als Sündenbock. Joseph Süß Oppenheimer (1698–1738)’, in M. Kaiser and A. Pečar (eds.), Der zweite Mann im Staat (Berlin, 2003), pp.155–76. Oppenheimer became the subject of several later novels and films as ‘Jew Süß’.

90. Friedrichs, ‘Anti-Jewish politics’, 151.

91. G. Schmidt-von Rhein and A. Cordes (eds.), Altes Reich und neues Recht (Wetzlar, 2006), pp.267–72.

92. Good introductions to this substantial topic include L. P. Wandel, The Reformation (Cambridge, 2011); D. MacCulloch, Reformation: Europe’s House Divided, 1490–1700 (London, 2003).

93. B. Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider. Verfassungsgeschichte und Symbolsprache des Alten Reiches (Munich, 2008), pp.99–135.

94. R. R. Benert, ‘Lutheran resistance theory and the imperial constitution’, Il pensiero politico, 6 (1973), 17–36; R. von Friedeburg, Self-Defence and Religious Strife in Early Modern Europe: England and Germany, 1530–1680 (Aldershot, 2002); A. Strohmeyer, Konfessionskonflikt und Herrschaftsordnung. Widerstandsrecht bei den österreichischen Ständen (1550–1650) (Mainz, 2006).

95. J. Whaley, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, 1493–1806 (2 vols., Oxford, 2012), I, pp.168–82, provides an excellent summary of the events.

96. The leading example was Leopold von Ranke, Deutsche Geschichte im Zeitalter der Reformation (Vienna, 1934), esp. pp.305–20. Echoes of this approach are still voiced today, e.g. T. A. Brady Jr, German Histories in the Age of Reformations, 1400–1650 (Cambridge, 2009).

97. H. Duchhardt, Protestantisches Kaisertum und Altes Reich (Wiesbaden, 1977), pp.8–51.

98. H. Lutz, ‘Friedensideen und Friedensprobleme in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in G. Heiss and H. Lutz (eds.), Friedensbewegungen, Bedingungen und Wirkungen (Munich, 1984), pp.28–54.

99. U. Andermann, ‘Säkularisation von der Säkularisation’, in his (ed.), Die geistlichen Staaten am Ende des Alten Reiches (Epfendorf, 2004), 13–30 at 15–21. See p.194 for the suppression of bishoprics.

100. C. Ocker, Church Robbers and Reformers in Germany, 1525–1547 (Leiden, 2006); H. Kellenbenz and P. Prodi (eds.), Fiskus, Kirche und Staat im konfessionellen Zeitalter (Berlin, 1994).

101. E.g. between Mainz, Hessen and Saxony: A. Schindling and W. Ziegler (eds.), Die Territorien des Reichs im Zeitalter der Reformation und die Konfessionalisierung (7 vols., Münster, 1989–97), IV, pp.75–6. This work provides the most comprehensive account of the Reformation outcomes in the Empire’s German territories.

102. M. Heckel, ‘Die Religionsprozesse des Reichskammergerichts im konfessionell gespaltenen Reichskirchenrecht’, ZSRG KA, 77 (1991), 283–350; G. Dolezalek, ‘Die juristische Argumentation der Assessoren am Reichskammergericht zu den Reformationsprozessen 1532–1538’, in B. Diestelkamp (ed.), Das Reichskammergericht in der deutschen Geschichte (Cologne, 1990), pp.25–58.

103. Schindling and Ziegler (eds.), Die Territorien des Reichs, I, pp.59–61.

104. R. Bireley, The Refashioning of Catholicism, 1450–1700 (Basingstoke, 1999); M. R. Forster, Catholic Germany from the Reformation to the Enlightenment (Basingstoke, 2007), pp.1–37.

105. Quotation from Whaley, Germany, I, p.323. See also L. Schorn-Schütte (ed.), Das Interim 1548/50 (Heidelberg, 2005). On Charles’s other measures at this point, see pp.228–9, 436–9.

106. N. Rein, The Chancery of God: Protestant Print, Polemic and Propaganda against the Empire, Magdeburg 1546–1551 (Aldershot, 2008); K. Schäfer, Der Fürstenaufstand gegen Karl V. im Jahr 1552 (Taunusstein, 2009); M. Fuchs and R. Rebitsch (eds.), Kaiser und Kurfürst. Aspekte des Fürstenaufstandes 1552 (Münster, 2010).

107. A. Kohler, Ferdinand I, 1503–1564 (Munich, 2003), pp.225–51; E. Wolgast, ‘Religionsfrieden als politisches Problem der frühen Neuzeit’, HZ, 282 (2006), 59–96.

108. The most substantial of the many works on the Peace is A. Gotthard, Der Augsburger Religionsfrieden (Münster, 2004), which in some respects returns to older, more pessimistic interpretations. A more positive corrective is provided by M. Heckel, ‘Politischer Friede und geistliche Freiheit im Ringen um die Wahrheit. Zur Historiographie des Augsburger Religionsfriedens von 1555’, HZ, 282 (2006), 391–425. For the deliberate ambiguities and dissimulation in the text, see M. Heckel, ‘Autonomia und Pacis Compositio’, ZSRG KA, 45 (1959), 141–248.

109. K. Schlaich, ‘Maioritas – protestatio – itio in partes – corpus Evangelicorum’, ZSRG KA, 63 (1977), 264–99 at 288–9.

110. Wolgast, ‘Religionsfrieden’, pp.63–4. See also H. Louthan, Converting Bohemia: Force and Persuasion in the Catholic Reformation (Cambridge, 2009), and pp.28–9.

111. G. R. Potter, Zwingli (Cambridge, 1976); M. Taplin, ‘Switzerland’, in A. Pettegree (ed.), The Reformation World (London, 2000), pp.169–89. The emergence of the Swiss Confederation is covered on pp.585–91.

112. B. Gordon, ‘Italy’, in Pettegree (ed.), Reformation World, pp.277–95; M. Firpo, ‘The Italian Reformation’, in R. Po-chia Hsia (ed.), A Companion to the Reformation World (Oxford, 2004), pp.169–84.

113. E. Cameron, The Reformation of the Heretics: The Waldenses of the Alps, 1480–1580 (Oxford, 1984), pp.163–6.

114. W. Reinhard, ‘Pressures towards confessionalization? Prolegomena to a theory of the confessional age’, in C. Scott Dixon (ed.), The German Reformation (Oxford, 1999), pp.169–92. Detailed coverage in Schindling and Ziegler (eds.), Die Territorien des Reichs.

115. The literature on these topics is now extensive. For a summary see S. R. Boettcher, ‘Confessionalization: Reformation, religion, absolutism and modernity’, History Compass, 2 (2004), 1–10. Good case studies include M. R. Forster, Catholic Revival in the Age of the Baroque: Religious Identity in Southwest Germany, 1550–1750(Cambridge, 2001); W. B. Smith, Reformation and the German Territorial State: Upper Franconia, 1300–1630 (Rochester, NY, 2008).

116. H. T. Gräf, Konfession und internationales System. Die Außenpolitik Hessen-Kassels im konfessionellen Zeitalter (Darmstadt, 1993), pp.108–11. This period of imperial politics is covered in more detail by A. P. Luttenberger, Kurfürsten, Kaiser und Reich. Politische Führung und Friedenssicherung unter Ferdinand I. und Maximilian II.(Mainz, 1994); Whaley, Germany, I, pp.339–474.

117. J. Engelbrecht, ‘Staat, Recht und Konfession. Krieg und Frieden im Rechtsdenken des Reiches’, in H. Lademacher and S. Groenveld (eds.), Krieg und Kultur (Münster, 1998), pp.113–28; A. Schmidt, ‘Irenic patriotism in sixteenth-and seventeenth-century German political discourse’, HJ, 53 (2010), 243–69.

118. G. Murdock, Beyond Calvin: The Intellectual, Political and Cultural World of Europe’s Reformed Churches (Basingstoke, 2004).

119. O. Chadwick, ‘The making of a reforming prince: Frederick III, elector Palatine’, in R. B. Knox (ed.), Reformation Conformity and Dissent (London, 1977), pp.44–69; B. Nischan, Prince, People and Confession: The Second Reformation in Brandenburg (Philadelphia, 1994). Emden’s exceptional character owed much to the presence of Dutch exiles: A. Pettegree, Emden and the Dutch Revolt (Oxford, 1992).

120. T. Sarx, ‘Heidelberger Irenik am Vorabend des Dreißigjährigen Krieges’, in A. Ernst and A. Schindling (eds.), Union und Liga, 1608/09 (Stuttgart, 2010), pp.167–96; V. Press, Calvinismus und Territorialstaat (Stuttgart, 1970).

121. Palatine-Bavarian rivalry is neglected in many general accounts of this period. Further coverage in A. L. Thomas, A House Divided: Wittelsbach Confessional Court Cultures in the Holy Roman Empire, c.1550–1650 (Leiden, 2010).

122. The issues are summarized effectively by M. Heckel, ‘Die Krise der Religionsverfassung des Reiches und die Anfänge des Dreißigjährigen Krieges’, in K. Repgen (ed.), Krieg und Politik, 1618–1648 (Munich, 1988), pp. 107–31. See also P. H. Wilson, ‘The Thirty Years War as the Empire’s constitutional crisis’, in R. J. W. Evans et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Oxford, 2011), pp.95–114.

123. R. Pörtner, The Counter-Reformation in Central Europe: Styria 1580–1630 (Oxford, 2001); H. Louthan, The Quest for Compromise: Peacemakers in Counter-Reformation Vienna (Cambridge, 1997); J. F. Patrouch, A Negotiated Settlement: The Counter-Reformation in Upper Austria under the Habsburgs (Boston, 2000); K. J. MacHardy, War, Religion and Court Patronage in Habsburg Austria: The Social and Cultural Dimensions of Political Interaction, 1521–1622 (Basingstoke, 2003).

124. For the debate on this point see P. H. Wilson, ‘The causes of the Thirty Years War, 1618–48’, EHR, 123 (2008), 554–86; W. Schulze (ed.), Friedliche Intentionen – Kriegerische Effekte. War der Ausbruch des Dreißigjährigen Krieges unvermeidlich? (St Katharinen, 2002). For the following see P. H. Wilson, Europe’s Tragedy: A History of the Thirty Years War (London, 2009); O. Asbach and P. Schröder (eds.), The Ashgate Research Companion to the Thirty Years’ War (Farnham, 2014). The Union and the League are discussed further on pp.564–5.

125. J. Polišenský, Tragic Triangle: The Netherlands, Spain and Bohemia, 1617–1621 (Prague, 1991). For an account by one of the Defenestrators’ victims, see P. H. Wilson (ed.), The Thirty Years War: A Sourcebook (Basingstoke, 2010), pp.35–7. All three survived their fall.

126. P. H. Wilson, ‘Dynasty, constitution and confession: The role of religion in the Thirty Years War’, International History Review, 30 (2008), 473–514; H. Schilling (ed.), Konfessioneller Fundamentalismus (Munich, 2007); F. Brendle and A. Schindling (eds.), Religionskriege im Alten Reich und in Alteuropa (Münster, 2006). See also the informative case study by H. Berg, Military Occupation under the Eyes of the Lord: Studies in Erfurt during the Thirty Years War (Göttingen, 2010).

127. Further elaboration of these points in P. H. Wilson, ‘Meaningless conflict? The character of the Thirty Years War’, in F. C. Schneid (ed.), The Projection and Limitations of Imperial Powers, 1618–1850 (Leiden, 2012), pp.12–33, and ‘Was the Thirty Years War a “total war”?’, in E. Charters et al. (eds.), Civilians and War in Europe, 1618–1815(Liverpool, 2012), pp.21–35.

128. R. Bireley, Ferdinand II, Counter-Reformation Emperor, 1578–1637 (Cambridge, 2014), esp. pp.91–166; T. Brockmann, Dynastie, Kaiseramt und Konfession. Politik und Ordnungsvorstellungen Ferdinands II. im Dreißigjährigen Krieg (Paderborn, 2011); D. Albrecht, Maximilian I. von Bayern 1573–1651 (Munich, 1998); P. D. Lockhart,Denmark in the Thirty Years, War, 1618–1648 (Selinsgrove, 1996).

129. H. Urban, Das Restitutionsedikt (Munich, 1968); M. Frisch, Das Restitutionsedikt Kaiser Ferdinands II. vom 6. März 1629 (Tübingen, 1993). See also pp.457–8.

130. I. Schuberth, Lützen – på spaning efter ett minne (Stockholm, 2007); M. Reichel and I. Schuberth (eds.), Gustav Adolf (Dößel, 2007); K. Cramer, The Thirty Years’ War and German Memory in the Nineteenth Century (Lincoln, NB, 2007). For the presentation of Sweden’s motives during the war, see E. Ringmar, Identity, Interest and Action: A Cultural Explanation of Sweden’s Intervention in the Thirty Years War (Cambridge, 1996).

131. J. Öhman, Der Kampf um den Frieden. Schweden und der Kaiser im Dreißigjährigen Krieg (Vienna, 2005). For the following see also D. Croxton, Peacemaking in Early Modern Europe: Cardinal Mazarin and the Congress of Westphalia, 1643–1648 (Selinsgrove, 1999), and his Westphalia: The Last Christian Peace (New York, 2013).

132. The full texts of both are available in various translations at www.pax-westphalica.de/ipmipo/index.html. The territorial redistribution is discussed on pp.220–29, while pp.441–3 cover the impact on the imperial constitution in greater depth.

133. R.-P. Fuchs, Ein ‘Medium zum Frieden’. Die Normaljahrsregel und die Beendigung des Dreißigjährigen Krieges (Munich, 2010).

134. Schlaich, ‘Majoritas’.

135. J. Luh, Unheiliges Römisches Reich. Der konfessionelle Gegensatz 1648 bis 1806 (Potsdam, 1995), pp.17–43. For the debate on the place of religion in politics after 1648, see D. Stievermann, ‘Politik und Konfession im 18. Jahrhundert’, ZHF, 18 (1991), 177–99.

136. Whaley, Germany, II, p.63.

137. M. Fulbrook, Piety and Politics (Cambridge, 1983); R. L. Gawthrop, Pietism and the Making of Eighteenth-Century Prussia (Cambridge, 1993).

138. E.-O. Mader, ‘Fürstenkonversionen zum Katholizismus in Mitteleuropa im 17. Jahrhundert’, ZHF, 34 (2007), 403–440; I. Peper, Konversionen im Umkreis des Wiener Hofes um 1700 (Vienna, 2010).

139. For a detailed example, see G. Haug-Moritz, Württembergischer Ständekonflikt und deutscher Dualismus (Stuttgart, 1992).

140. G. Haug-Moritz, ‘Corpus Evangelicorum und deutscher Dualismus’, in V. Press (ed.), Alternativen zur Reichsverfassung in der Frühen Neuzeit? (Munich, 1995), pp.189–207; P. H. Wilson, ‘Prussia and the Holy Roman Empire, 1700–40’, GHIL, 36 (2014), 3–48.

141. This is claimed for Augsburg: E. François, Die unsichtbare Grenze. Protestanten und Katholiken in Augsburg, 1648–1806 (Sigmaringen, 1991). The other three bi-confessional cities were Biberach, Dinkelsbühl and Ravensburg. See also J. Whaley, ‘A tolerant society? Religious toleration in the Holy Roman Empire, 1648–1806’, in O. P. Grell and R. Porter (eds.), Toleration in Enlightenment Europe (Cambridge, 2000), pp.175–95.

142. The changes are listed in more detail in H. Neuhaus, Das Reich in der Frühen Neuzeit (Munich, 1997), pp.30–31. See also W. Ziegler, ‘Die Hochstifte des Reiches im konfessionellen Zeitalter 1520–1618’, Römische Quartalschrift, 87 (1992), 252–81. Only seven imperial abbeys disappeared through direct secularization during the Reformation. Six left the Empire through incorporation within the Swiss Confederation. See also pp.409–14.

143. The last to do this was Isny in 1782.

144. H. Brück, Geschichte der katholische Kirche in Deutschland im neunzehnten Jahrhundert (4 vols., Mainz, 1887–1901), I, p.3.

145. S. Schraut, Das Haus Schönborn. Eine Familienbiographie. Katholischer Reichsadel, 1640–1840 (Paderborn, 2005).

146. L. G. Duggan, ‘The church as an institution of the Reich’, in J. A. Vann and S. Rowan (eds.), The Old Reich (Brussels, 1974), pp.149–64 at 154–5. The proportion of commoners in the medieval church was probably higher, since the social background of 421 bishops is unknown. See also B. Blisch, ‘Kurfürsten und Domherren’, in F. Dumont et al. (eds.), Mainz. Die Geschichte der Stadt (Mainz, 1998), pp.879–97; G. Christ, ‘Selbstverständnis und Rolle der Domkapitel in den geistlichen Territorien des alten deutschen Reiches in der Frühneuzeit’, ZHF, 16 (1989), 257–328.

147. E. Gatz (ed.), Die Bischöfe des Heiligen Römischen Reiches 1448 bis 1648 (Berlin, 1996), pp.163–71; G. Bönisch, Clemens August (Bergisch Gladbach, 2000).

148. E.g. K. Epstein, The Genesis of German Conservatism (Princeton, 1966), pp.276–85, 605–15.

149. T. C. W. Blanning, Reform and Revolution in Mainz, 1743–1803 (Cambridge, 1974); P. H. Wilson, German Armies: War and German Politics, 1648–1806 (London, 1998); J. Nowosadtko, Stehendes Heer im Ständestaat. Das Zusammenleben von Militär- und Zivilbevölkerung im Fürstbistum Münster 1650–1803 (Paderborn, 2011).

150. D. Beales, Prosperity and Plunder: European Catholic Monasteries in the Age of Revolution, 1650–1815 (Cambridge, 2003); M. Printy, Enlightenment and the Creation of German Catholicism (Cambridge, 2009).

151. Febronism’s place in imperial politics is discussed in more detail by K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, 1648–1806 (4 vols., Stuttgart, 1993–2000), III, pp.237–97. For the League of Princes see also pp.482, 640–42.

152. E.g. Dalberg held a mass to celebrate Napoleon’s victories over Prussia at Jena and Auerstädt in 1806. For this and the following see K. Hausberger (ed.), Carl von Dalberg (Regensburg, 1995); K. M. Färber, Kaiser und Erzkanzler. Carl von Dalberg und Napoleon am Ende des Alten Reiches (Regensburg, 1988); G. Menzel, ‘Franz Joseph von Albini, 1748–1816’, Mainzer Zeitschrift, 69 (1974), 1–126; R. Decot (ed.), Säkularisation der Reichskirche, 1803 (Mainz, 2002); K. Härter, ‘Zweihundert Jahre nach dem europäischen Umbruch von 1803’, ZHF, 33 (2006), 89–115. See also pp.641–54, and the coverage of the Confederation of the Rhine on pp.660–63.

153. W. H. B. Smith, Mauser Rifles and Pistols (Harrisburg, PA, 1947), pp.12–13.

154. Detailed example in E. Klueting, ‘“Damenstifter sind zufluchtsörter, wo sich Fräuleins von adel schicklich aufhalten können”. Zur Säkularisation von Frauengemeinschaften in Westfalen und im Rheinland 1773–1812’, in T. Schilp (ed.), Reform – Reformation – Säkularisation. Frauenstifte in Krisenzeiten (Essen, 2004), pp.177–200.

155. Aretin, Alte Reich, III, pp.518–21.

CHAPTER 3: SOVEREIGNTY

1. J. D. Tracy, Emperor Charles V, Impresario of War: Campaign Strategy, International Finance, and Domestic Politics (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 239–40. For the following see also J. M. Headley, ‘The Habsburg world empire and the revival of Ghibellinism’, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 7 (1978), 93–127 esp. 116; E. Rosenthal, ‘Plus ultra,non plus ultra, and the columnar device of Emperor Charles V’, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, 34 (1971), 204–28.

2. G. Dagron, Emperor and Priest: The Imperial Office in Byzantium (Cambridge, 2003); F. Dvornik, Early Christian and Byzantine Political Philosophy (2 vols., Washington DC, 1966); D. M. Nicol, ‘Byzantine political thought’, in J. H. Burns (ed.), The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought c.350–c.1450 (Cambridge, 1988), pp.51–79.

3. E. N. Luttwak, The Grand Strategy of the Byzantine Empire (Cambridge, MA, 2009).

4. The theological differences are summarized in R. Collins, Early Medieval Europe, 300–1000 (Basingstoke, 1991), pp.266–8; R. W. Southern, Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages (Harmondsworth, 1970), pp.62–5.

5. Ottonian engagement with Poland and Hungary is explored in more depth on pp.204–7. For the following see C. A. Frazee, ‘The Christian church in Cilician Armenia: Its relations with Rome and Constantinople to 1198’, Church History, 45 (1976), 166–84; David R. Stokes, ‘A failed alliance and expanding horizons: Relations between the Austrian Habsburgs and the Safavid Persians in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries’ (University of St Andrews PhD thesis, 2014), 156–61.

6. K. Müller, ‘Kurfürst Johann Wilhelm und die europäische Politik seiner Zeit’, Düsseldorfer Jahrbuch, 60 (1986), 1–23 at 13–14.

7. W. Ohnsorge, Das Zweikaiserproblem im früheren Mittelalter (Hildesheim, 1947). For imperial-Byzantine conflicts in Italy, see pp.187–92.

8. L. H. Nelson and M. V. Shirk (eds.), Liutprand of Cremona: Mission to Constantinople (968 AD) (Lawrence, KS, 1972); G. Koch, Auf dem Wege zum Sacrum Imperium (Vienna, 1972), pp.218–30; A. A. Latowsky, Emperor of the World: Charlemagne and the Construction of Imperial Authority, 800–1229 (Ithaca, NY, 2013), pp.44–51.

9. M. Becher, Otto der Große (Munich, 2012), pp.245–51; S. Weinfurter, The Salian Century (Philadelphia, 1999), pp.28–9. For tenth-century imperial-Byzantine contacts generally, see K. Leyser, Medieval Germany and its Neighbours, 900–1250 (London, 1982), pp.103–37. On Theophanu see also pp.315–16.

10. P. Frankopan, The First Crusade: The Call from the East (Cambridge, MA, 2012).

11. W. Treadgold, A Concise History of Byzantium (Basingstoke, 2001), pp. 215–16, 236.

12. M. Angold, The Fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans (New York, 2012).

13. Koch, Auf dem Wege, pp.227–9.

14. A. Cameron, The Byzantines (Oxford, 2010), pp.163–6; P. Burke, ‘Did Europe exist before 1700?’, History of European Ideas, 1 (1980), 21–9; J. Hale, The Civilisation of Europe in the Renaissance (London, 1993), pp. 3–50; L. Wolff, Inventing Eastern Europe: The Map of Civilization in the Mind of the Enlightenment (Stanford, 1994), and the contributions of J. G. A. Pocock and W. C. Jordan in A. Pagden (ed.), The Idea of Europe from Antiquity to the European Union (Cambridge, 2002).

15. A. Çirakman, From the ‘Terror of the World’ to the ‘Sick Man of Europe’: European Images of Ottoman Empire and Society from the Sixteenth Century to the Nineteenth (New York, 2002); A. Höfert, Den Feind beschreiben: ‘Türkengefahr’ und europäisches Wissen über das Osmanische Reich, 1450–1600 (Frankfurt, 2003); S. Faroqhi,The Ottoman Empire and the World around It (London, 2007); M. Wrede, Das Reich und seine Feinde. Politische Feindbilder in der Reichspatriotischen Publizistik zwischen Westfälischem Frieden und Siebenjährigem Krieg (Mainz, 2004), pp.66–216; P. Sutter Fichtner, Terror and Toleration: The Habsburg Empire Confronts Islam, 1526–1850(London, 2008), pp.21–53.

16. S. F. Dale, The Muslim Empires of the Ottomans, Safavids and Mughals (Cambridge, 2010).

17. C. Finkel, Osman’s Dream: The Story of the Ottoman Empire, 1300–1923 (London, 2005).

18. K. Barkey, Empire of Difference: The Ottomans in Comparative Perspective (Cambridge, 2008), pp.101–8; I. Almond, Two Faiths One Banner: When Muslims Marched with Christians across Europe’s Battlegrounds (Cambridge, MA, 2009), pp.134–6.

19. J. Darwin, After Tamerlane: The Global History of Empire since 1405 (New York, 2008), pp.37–8; J. Burbank and F. Cooper, Empires in World History (Princeton, 2010), pp.70–78.

20. G. Althoff, Die Ottonen (2nd ed., Stuttgart, 2005), pp.111–12.

21. C. Kostick, ‘Social unrest and the failure of Conrad III’s march through Anatolia, 1147’, GH, 28 (2010), 125–42; G. A. Loud (ed.), The Crusade of Frederick Barbarossa: The History of the Expedition of the Emperor Frederick and Related Texts (Farnham, 2013), pp.48–55. See also the sources cited on p.775.

22. W. Stürner, Friedrich II. (2 vols., Darmstadt, 2009), II, pp.68–74, 85–98, 130–69; Almond, Two Faiths, pp.49–74.

23. L. Scales, The Shaping of German Identity: Authority and Crisis, 1245–1414 (Cambridge, 2012), pp.221–4.

24. G. Hödl, Albrecht II. Königtum, Reichsregierung und Reichsreform, 1438–1439 (Vienna, 1978), p.195.

25. J. H. Elliott, Imperial Spain, 1469–1716 (London, 1963), pp.45–76. Poland had its own tradition as ‘Christendom’s bulwark’: see N. Davies, God’s Playground: A History of Poland (2nd ed., 2 vols., Oxford, 2005), I, pp.125–30.

26. S. Vryonis Jr, ‘The Byzantine legacy and Ottoman forms’, Dumbarton Oaks Papers, 23/24 (1969/70), 251–308.

27. M. S. Birdal, The Holy Roman Empire and the Ottomans: From Global Imperial Power to Absolutist States (London, 2011), pp.59–85 esp. p.84. For the rule of law in the Empire, see pp.631–7.

28. Finkel, Osman’s Dream, pp.48, 53–4; Barkey, Empire of Difference, pp.82–3.

29. M. F. Alvarez, Charles V (London, 1975), pp.82–8. For the following see G. Necipoğlu, ‘Süleyman the Magnificent and the representation of power in the context of Ottoman-Hapsburg-papal rivalry’, The Art Bulletin, 71 (1989), 401–27.

30. J. Reston Jr, Defenders of the Faith: Charles V, Suleyman the Magnificent and the Battle for Europe, 1520–1536 (London, 2009); Tracy, Emperor Charles V, pp.141–9, 154–9, 170–82.

31. P. S. Fichtner, Emperor Maximilian II (New Haven, CT, 2001), pp.119–34; J. P. Niederkorn, Die europäischen Mächte und der ‘Lange Türkenkrieg’ Kaiser Rudolfs II. (1593–1606) (Vienna, 1993).

32. J. F. Pichler, ‘Captain John Smith in the light of Styrian sources’, The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 65 (1957), 332–54.

33. Stokes, ‘A failed alliance and expanding horizons’; J. P. Niederkorn, ‘Zweifrontenkrieg gegen die Osmanen. Iranisch-christliche Bündnispläne in der Zeit des “Langen Türkenkrieges”, 1593–1606’, MIÖG, 104 (1996), 310–23.

34. Quoted in K.-H. Ziegler, ‘The peace treaties of the Ottoman empire with European Christian powers’, in R. C. H. Lesaffer (ed.), Peace Treaties and International Law in European History (Cambridge, 2004), pp.338–64 at 345. For the following see also G. Wagner, ‘Österreich und die Osmanen im Dreißigjährigen Krieg’, Mitteilungen des Oberösterreichischen Landesarchivs, 14 (1984), 325–92; I. Hiller, ‘Feind im Frieden. Die Rolle des Osmanischen Reiches in der europäischen Politik zur Zeit des Westfälischen Friedens’, in H. Duchhardt (ed.), Der Westfälische Friede (Munich, 1998), pp.393–404; R. R. Heinisch, ‘Habsburg, die Pforte und der Böhmische Aufstand (1618–1620)’,Südost-Forschungen, 33 (1974), 125–65, and 34 (1975), 79–124.

35. E. Eickhoff, Venedig, Wien und die Osmanen. Umbruch in Südosteuropa, 1645–1700 (Munich, 1970), pp.179–227. See also pp.443–62.

36. E. Petrasch et al. (eds.), Die Karlsruher Türkenbeute (Munich, 1991). For the siege and relief, see J. Stoye, The Siege of Vienna (London, 1964); P. H. Wilson, German Armies: War and German Politics, 1648–1806 (London, 1998), pp.68–100.

37. Fichtner, Terror and Toleration, pp.61–76; K. A. Roider Jr, Austria’s Eastern Question, 1700–1790 (Princeton, 1982), pp.77–8.

38. M. Cherniavsky, Tsar and People: Studies in Russian Myths (New Haven, CT, 1961), pp.6–43; S. Franklin and J. Shepard, The Emergence of Rus, 750–1200 (London, 1996).

39. I. de Madariaga, ‘Tsar into emperor: The title of Peter the Great’, in R. Oresko et al. (eds.), Royal and Republican Sovereignty in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge, 1997), pp.351–81.

40. L. Hughes, Russia in the Age of Peter the Great (New Haven, CT, 1998), p.352; W. Baumgart, The Crimean War, 1853–1856 (London, 1999), pp.10–12. See generally H. Schraeder, Moskau das dritte Rom. Studien zur Geschichte der politischen Theorien in der slawischen Welt (Darmstadt, 1957).

41. It reappeared on the Russian president’s flag in 1994. It is also used by the self-governing theocracy of Mount Athos, which persists under Greek protection. Further discussion of the double-eagle image on pp.270–72.

42. A. Knobler, ‘Holy wars, empires and the portability of the past: The modern uses of medieval crusades’, Comparative Studies in Society and History, 48 (2006), 293–325 at 302–3.

43. C. Roll, ‘Hatten die Moskowiter einen Begriff vom Reich?’, in M. Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum – irregulare corpus – Teutscher Reichs-Staat (Mainz, 2002), pp.135–65.

44. For the wedding see R. K. Massie, Peter the Great and his World (London, 1981), pp.625–6. The dynastic ties are explored at length in C. Scharf, Katharina II., Deutschland und die Deutschen (Mainz, 1995), pp.272–346, which has excellent genealogical tables. For the context see W. Mediger, Mecklenburg, Rußland und England-Hannover, 1706–1721 (2 vols., Hildesheim, 1967).

45. Madariaga, ‘Tsar into emperor’, pp.358–9, 374–5; Hughes, Russia, p.97.

46. A. H. Benna, ‘Das Kaisertum Österreich und die römische Liturgie’, MÖSA, 9 (1956), 118–36 at 118–19.

47. K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Das Reich. Friedensordnung und europäisches Gleichgewicht, 1648–1806 (Stuttgart, 1986), pp.337–52. Further coverage of late imperial politics on pp.469–82.

48. Fuller discussion in C. Brühl, Deutschland – Frankreich. Die Geburt zweier Völker (Cologne, 1990).

49. R. Morrissey, Charlemagne and France (Notre Dame, IN, 2003), pp.49–85; K. F. Werner, ‘Das hochmittelalterliche Imperium im politischen Bewusstsein Frankreichs (10.–12. Jahrhundert)’, HZ, 200 (1965), 1–60; H. Löwe, ‘Kaisertum und Abendland in ottonischer und frühsalischer Zeit’, HZ, 196 (1963), 529–62 at 544–8.

50. G. Duby, The Legend of Bouvines (Berkeley, 1990), p.136..

51. C. Jones, Eclipse of Empire? Perceptions of the Western Empire and its Rulers in Late-Medieval France (Turnhout, 2007), esp. pp.357–61.

52. G. Zeller, Aspects de la politique française sous l’Ancien Régime (Paris, 1964), pp.12–98; J.-M. Moeglin, ‘Der Blick von Frankreich auf das mittelalterlichen Reich’, in B. Schneidmüller and S. Weinfurter (eds.), Heilig – Römisch – Deutsch. Das Reich im mittelalterlichen Europa (Dresden, 2006), pp.251–65. Rigord’s ‘Deeds of Philip Augustus’ can be found in H.-F. Delaborde (ed.), Oeuvres de Rigord et de Guillaume le Breton (2 vol., Paris, 1882–5), II. Thanks to Colin Veach for drawing my attention to this source.

53. This point is made by C. Jones, ‘Understanding political conceptions in the later Middle Ages: The French imperial candidatures and the idea of the nation-state’, Viator, 42 (2011), 83–114 at 113–14.

54. Morrissey, Charlemagne and France, pp.108–9; Zeller, Aspects de la politique française, pp.55–9. Henry VIII of England was also a candidate, but withdrew once he realized that election would prove expensive.

55. Zeller, Aspects de la politique française, pp.76–82.

56. M. Wrede, ‘L’état de l’Empire empire? Die französische Historiographie und das Reich im Zeitalter Ludwigs XIV’, in Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum, pp.89–110; R. L. John, Reich und Kirche im Spiegel französischen Denkens. Das Rombild von Caesar bis Napoleon (Vienna, 1953), pp.156–208; Morrissey, Charlemagne and France, pp.152–9, 206–8; C. Kampmann, Arbiter und Friedenstiftung. Die Auseinandersetzung um den politischen Schiedsrichter im Europa der Frühen Neuzeit (Paderborn, 2001), pp.66–241.

57. P. C. Hartmann, Geld als Instrument europäischer Machtpolitik im Zeitalter des Merkantilismus (Munich, 1978). Further discussion of Charles VII on pp.477–8.

58. K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, 1648–1806 (4 vols., Stuttgart, 1993–2000), III, pp.458–67.

59. G. Wagner, ‘Pläne und Versuche der Erhebung Österreichs zum Königreich’, in idem (ed.), Österreich von der Staatsidee zum Nationalbewußtsein (Vienna, 1982), pp.394–432; G. Klingenstein, ‘Was bedeuten “Österreich” und “österreichisch” im 18. Jahrhundert?’, in R. G. Plaschka et al. (eds.), Was heißt Österreich? (Vienna, 1995), pp.149–220.

60. K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, ‘The Old Reich: A federation or hierarchical system?’, in R. J. W. Evans et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Oxford, 2011), pp.27–42 at 36; D. Beales, Joseph II (2 vols., Cambridge, 1987–2009), II, p.148. Joseph’s assessment of the Empire has been edited by H. Conrad as ‘Verfassung und politische Lage des Reiches in einer Denkschrift Josephs II. von 1767/68’, in L. Carlen and F. Steinegger (eds.), Festschrift Nikolaus Grass (2 vols., Innsbruck, 1974), I, pp.161–85.

61. Quoted by A. Schmid, ‘Franz I. und Maria Theresia (1745–1765)’, in A. Schindling and W. Ziegler (eds.), Die Kaiser der Neuzeit 1519–1918 (Munich, 1990), pp.232–48 at 239–40. For the following see also P. H. Wilson, ‘Bolstering the prestige of the Habsburgs: The end of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806’, IHR, 28 (2006), 709–36.

62. A. H. Benna, ‘Kaiser und Reich, Staat und Nation in der Geschichte Österreichs’, in Wagner (ed.), Österreich, pp.377–93 at 381–3, and her ‘Das Kaisertum Österreich’, MÖSA, 9 (1956), 122–5. See also P. H. Wilson, ‘The meaning of empire in central Europe around 1800’, in A. Forrest and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Bee and the Eagle: Napoleonic France and the End of the Holy Roman Empire, 1806 (Basingstoke, 2009), pp.22–41.

63. S. Externbrink, Friedrich der Große, Maria Theresia und das Alte Reich. Deutschlandbild und Diplomatie Frankreichs im Siebenjährigen Krieg (Berlin, 2006); E. Buddruss, Die französische Deutschlandpolitik, 1756–1789 (Mainz, 1995).

64. R. Dufraise, ‘Das Reich aus der Sicht der Encyclopédie méthodique 1784–1788’, in R. A. Müller (ed.), Bilder des Reiches (Sigmaringen, 1997), pp.123–54.

65. S. S. Biro, The German Policy of Revolutionary France: A Study in French Diplomacy during the War of the First Coalition, 1792–1797 (2 vols., Cambridge, MA, 1957).

66. R. Wohlfeil, ‘Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des Rheinbundes, 1806–13. Das Verhältnis Dalbergs zu Napoleon’, ZGO, 108 (1960), 85–108 at 95; K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, ‘Das Reich und Napoleon’, in W. D. Gruner and K. J. Müller (eds.), Über Frankreich nach Europa (Hamburg, 1996), pp.183–200 at 198–9. Dalberg’s motives are discussed on pp.134–6. P. Dwyer gives more attention to Napoleon’s attitudes towards the Empire than most biographers: Napoleon: The Path to Power, 1769–1799 (London, 2007), and Citizen Emperor: Napoleon in Power, 1799–1815 (London, 2013).

67. Napoleon I, correspondance de Napoléon Ier (32 vols., Paris, 1858–70), III, p.74. For the following see M. Pape, ‘Der Karlskult an Wendepunkten der neueren deutschen Geschichte’, HJb, 120 (2000), 138–81 at 142–61.

68. M. Lyons, Napoleon Bonaparte and the Legacy of the French Revolution (Basingstoke, 1994), pp.230–31; N. Aston, The French Revolution, 1789–1804 (Basingstoke, 2004), pp.93–5; Morrissey, Charlemagne and France, pp.252–69; John, Reich und Kirche, pp.230–48. Napoleon told Pius VII ‘Je suis Charlemagne’ on 15 February 1806.

69. H. Rössler, Napoleons Griff nach der Karlskrone. Das Ende des Alten Reiches, 1806 (Munich, 1957), pp.73–6; M. Broers, ‘Napoleon, Charlemagne and Lotharingia: Acculturation and the boundaries of Napoleonic Europe’, HJ, 44 (2001), 135–54.

70. HHStA, Staatskanzlei Vorträge, Kart.167, 20 May 1804.

71. HHStA, Staatskanzlei Vorträge, Kart.168, memorandum of 8 Aug. 1804. Cobenzl believed the recent union of the British and Irish parliaments presaged the assumption of a British imperial title. See also Prinzipalkom-mission Berichte Fasz.179b, decision of 11 Aug. 1804. Fuller discussion of these deliberations in G. Mraz, Österreich und das Reich, 1804–1806 (Vienna, 1993).

72. HHStA, Titel und Wappen Kart.3.

73. Cited by K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Heiliges Römisches Reich, 1776–1806 (2 vols., Wiesbaden, 1967), I, p.468 n.86.

74. HHStA, Prinzipalkommission Berichte Fasz.179b, report from 27 Aug. 1804. Several historians have agreed with Sweden: Aretin, Heiliges Römisches Reich, I, p.468; H. Ritter v. Srbik, Das Österreichische Kaisertum und das Ende des Heiligen Römischen Reiches, 1804–1806 (Berlin, 1927), pp.24–5, 38.

75. K. M. Färber, Kaiser und Erzkanzler. Carl von Dalberg und Napoleon am Ende des Alten Reiches (Regensburg, 1988), pp.86–92; Rössler, Napoleons Griff, pp.21–2. The Empire’s dissolution is discussed further on pp.644–59.

76. Cited by G. Post, ‘Two notes on nationalism in the Middle Ages’, Traditio, 9 (1953), 281–320 at 307–8. See also S. Epperlein, ‘Über das romfreie Kaisertum im frühen Mittelalter’, Jahrbuch für Geschichte, 2 (1967), 307–42 at 323–8; Löwe, ‘Kaisertum und Abendland’, pp.548–56.

77. H. Thomas, ‘Die lehnrechtlichen Beziehungen des Herzogtums Lothringen zum Reich von der Mitte des 13. bis zum Ende des 14. Jahrhunderts’, RVJB, 38 (1974), 166–202 at 167, 173–4. See also H. K. Schulze, Grund-strukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), III, pp.230–31.

78. Among the many works on Charles, that edited by H. Soly (Antwerp, 1998) gives the best overview of him as pan-European monarch.

79. J. M. Headley, ‘“Ehe Türckisch als Bäpstisch”: Lutheran reflections on the problem of Empire, 1623–28’, CEH, 20 (1987), 3–28 at 5; F. Bosbach, Monarchia universalis. Ein politischer Leitbegriff der Frühen Neuzeit (Munich, 1988), pp.45–56.

80. Fichtner, Emperor Maximilian II, pp.24–6, 29–30.

81. Cosmographia first appeared in 1544 and included Putsch’s map in the editions published after 1556. See also E. Straub, Pax et Imperium. Spaniens Kampf et seine Friedensordnung in Europa zwischen 1617 und 1635 (Paderborn, 1980), pp.20–28.

82. F. Edelmayer, Maximilian II., Philipp II. und Reichsitalien. (Stuttgart, 1988), and his Söldner und Pensionäre. Das Netzwerk Philipps II. im Heiligen Römischen Reich (Munich, 2002), esp. pp.48–51.

83. L. Geevers, ‘The conquistador and the phoenix: The Franco-Spanish precedence dispute (1564–1610) as a battle of kingship’, IHR, 35 (2013), 23–41 at 34–7. For the following see H. Ernst, Madrid und Wien, 1632–1637 (Münster, 1991); D. Maffi, En defensa del imperio. Los ejércitos de Felipe IV y la Guerra por la hegemonía europea (1635–1659) (Madrid, 2014).

84. C. Storrs, The Resilience of the Spanish Monarchy, 1665–1700 (Oxford, 2006).

85. L. Auer, ‘Zur Rolle Italiens in der österreichischen Politik um das spanischen Erbe’, MÖSA, 31 (1978), 52–72; L. and M. Frey, A Question of Empire: Leopold I and the War of Spanish Succession, 1701–1705 (Boulder, CO, 1983).

86. These claims are made by H. Schilling, Höfe und Allianzen. Deutschland 1648–1763 (Münster, 1989), pp.61–70.

87. I. Hantsche (ed.), Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679) als Vermittler (Münster, 2005); K. Siebenhüner, ‘Where did the jewels of the German imperial princes come from?’, in R. J. W. Evans and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806: A European Perspective (Leiden, 2012), pp.333–48; P. Malekandathil, The Germans, the Portuguese and India (Hamburg, 1999); C. Tzoref-Ashkenazi, German Soldiers in Colonial India (London, 2014); R. Atwood, The Hessians: Mercenaries from Hessen-Kassel in the American Revolution (Cambridge, 1980); T. Biskup, ‘German colonialism in the early modern period’, in J. McKenzie (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Empire(Oxford, 2016), forthcoming.

88. G. H. Weiss, In Search of Silk: Adam Olearius’ Mission to Russia and Persia (Minneapolis, 1983). For the following see P. H. Smith, The Business of Alchemy: Science and Culture in the Holy Roman Empire (Princeton, 1994), pp.141–72.

89. R. Schück, Brandenburg-Preußens Kolonial-Politik unter dem Großen Kurfürsten und seinen Nachfolgern (1647–1721) (2 vols., Leipzig, 1889). For the following see H. Hassinger, ‘Die erste Wiener orientalische Handelskompagnie 1667–1683’, VSWG, 35 (1942), 1–53; F. Schui, ‘Prussia’s “trans-oceanic moment”: The creation of the Prussian Asiatic Trading Company in 1750’, HJ, 49 (2008), 143–60.

90. R. Bartlett and B. Mitchell, ‘State-sponsored immigration into eastern Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries’, in R. Bartlett and K. Schönwälder (eds.), The German Lands and Eastern Europe (London, 1999), pp.91–114; C. Dipper, Deutsche Geschichte, 1648–1789 (Frankfurt am Main, 1991), pp.23–6; G. Schmidt, Wandel durch Vernunft. Deutsche Geschichte im 18. Jahrhundert (Munich, 2009), p.256. For the ‘Transylvanian Saxons’ see R. J. W. Evans, Austria, Hungary, and the Habsburgs: Central Europe c.1683–1867 (Oxford, 2006), pp.206–27.

91. Anglo-Hanoverian connections are discussed further on pp.219, 222–3.

92. W. J. Millor et al. (eds.), The Letters of John of Salisbury (London, 1955), I, p.206, letter no.124 to Ralph of Sarre in June/July 1160. For the schism see pp.63–4.

93. Quote from T. D. Hardy (ed.), Rotuli litterarum patentium (London, 1835), p.18. My thanks to Colin Veach for this reference.

94. W. Ullmann, ‘The development of the medieval idea of sovereignty’, EHR, 64 (1949), 1–33; E. E. Stengel, Abhandlungen und Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des Kaisergedankens im Mittelalter (Cologne, 1965), pp.239–86; W. Kienast, Deutschland und Frankreich in der Kaiserzeit (900–1270): Weltkaiser und Einzelkönige (3 vols., Stuttgart, 1974–5), II; Jones, Eclipse of Empire?, pp.355–6; J. Headley, ‘The demise of universal monarchy as a meaningful political idea’, in F. Bosbach and H. Hiery (eds.), Imperium / Empire / Reich (Munich, 1999), pp.41–58.

95. C. Hirschi, The Origins of Nationalism: An Alternative History from Ancient Rome to Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 2012), pp.81–8.

96. B. Stollberg-Rilinger, ‘Die Wissenschaft der feinen Unterschiede. Das Präzedenzrecht und die europäischen Monarchien vom 16. bis zum 18. Jahrhundert’, Majestas, 10 (2002), 125–50.

97. Kampmann, Arbiter und Friedenstiftung, pp.26–64.

98. P. Schmidt, Spanische Universalmonarchie oder ‘teutsche Libertet’ (Stuttgart, 2001); D. Böttcher, ‘Propaganda und öffentliche Meinung im protestantischen Deutschland 1628–1636’, in H. U. Rudolf (ed.), Der Dreissigjährige Krieg (Darmstadt, 1977), pp.325–67.

99. J. E. Thomson, Mercenaries, Pirates and Sovereigns: State-Building and Extraterritorial Violence in Early Modern Europe (Princeton, 1994); C. Tilly, Coercion, Capital and European States, AD 990–1992 (rev. ed., Oxford, 1992).

100. For overviews of the Empire’s place in European relations at this point see D. Berg, Deutschland und seine Nachbarn, 1200–1500 (Munich, 1997); H. Duchhardt, Altes Reich und europäische Staatenwelt 1648–1806 (Munich, 1990).

101. For the general context see J. Black, European Warfare, 1494–1660 (London, 2002).

102. J. C. Lünig, Corpus juris militaris des Heiligen Römischen Reichs (2 vols., Leipzig, 1723), I, pp.381–7; H. Steiger, ‘Das ius belli ac pacis des Alten Reiches zwischen 1645 und 1801’, Der Staat, 37 (1998), 493–520. The mechanisms of imperial collective security are discussed on pp.454–62.

103. K. Müller, ‘Zur Reichskriegserklärung im 17. und 18. Jahrhundert’, ZSRG GA, 90 (1973), 246–59 at 249. For the following see C. Kampmann, Reichsrebellion und kaiserliche Acht. Politische Strafjustiz im Dreißigjährigen Krieg und das Verfahren gegen Wallenstein 1634 (Münster, 1992), and his ‘Reichstag und Reichskriegserklärung im Zeitalter Ludwigs XIV.’, HJb, 113 (1993), 41–59.

104. The opinion of the Swabian imperial Estates in 1705 cited by M. Plassmann, Krieg und Defension am Oberrhein. Die Vorderen Reichskreise und Markgraf Ludwig Wilhelm von Baden (1693–1706) (Berlin, 2000), p.595.

105. P. H. Wilson, ‘The German “soldier trade” of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries’, IHR, 18 (1996), 757–92.

106. J. G. Droysen, Geschichte der preußischen Politik (5 parts in 14 vols., Leipzig, 1855–86), part 3, I, pp.338–40. Similar views are widely expressed throughout the twentieth century, e.g. A. Randelzhofer, Völkerrechtliche Aspekte des Heiligen Römischen Reiches nach 1648 (Berlin, 1967). For recent and critical engagement with the question of sovereignty in the Westphalian settlement see: D. Croxton, ‘The Peace of Westphalia of 1648 and the origins of sovereignty’, IHR, 21 (1999), 569–91; A. Osiander, ‘Sovereignty, international relations, and the Westphalian myth’, International Organization, 55 (2001), 251–87; P. M. R. Stirk, ‘The Westphalian model and sovereign equality’,Review of International Studies, 38 (2012), 641–60.

107. A. Waddington, L’acquisition de la couronne royale de Prusse par les Hohenzollern (Paris, 1888), p.43. Further discussion of the context in H. Duchhardt, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte, 1495–1806 (Stuttgart, 1991), pp.180–95, and in the present book pp.218–20.

108. P. H. Wilson, ‘Das Heilige Römische Reich, die machtpolitisch schwache Mitte Europas – mehr Sicherheit oder eine Gefahr für den Frieden?’, in M. Lanzinner (ed.), Sicherheit in der Vormoderne und Gegenwart (Paderborn, 2013), pp.25–34.

109. J. Arndt, ‘Die kaiserlichen Friedensvermittlungen im spanisch-niederländischen Krieg 1568–1609’, RVJB, 62 (1998), 161–83; Fichtner, Emperor Maximilian II, pp.156–72; J. Lavery, Germany’s Northern Challenge: The Holy Roman Empire and the Scandinavian Struggle for the Baltic, 1563–1576 (Boston, 2002), pp.105–32.

110. H. Duchhardt, ‘Westfälischer Friede und internationales System im ancien régime’, HZ, 249 (1989), 529–43.

111. L. Auer, ‘Konfliktverhütung und Sicherheit. Versuche zwischenstaatlicher Friedenswahrung in Europa zwischen den Friedensschlüssen von Oliva und Aachen 1660–1668’, in H. Duchhardt (ed.), Zwischenstaatliche Friedenswahrung in Mittelalter und Früher Neuzeit (Cologne, 1991), pp.153–83; K. P. Decker, Frankreich und die Reichsstände, 1672–1675 (Bonn, 1981); A. Sinkoli, Frankreich, das Reich und die Reichsstände, 1697–1702 (Frankfurt am Main, 1995).

112. K. Härter, ‘The Permanent Imperial Diet in European context, 1663–1806’, in Evans et al. (eds.), Holy Roman Empire, pp.115–35. The Empire’s pacific character was presented positively in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century engravings: see J. Burkhardt, ‘Reichskriege in der frühneuzeitlichen Bild-publizistik’, in Müller (ed.), Bilder des Reiches, pp.51–95 at 72–80.

113. K. v. Raumer, Ewiger Friede. Friedensrufe und Friedenspläne seit der Renaissance (Munich, 1953); P. Schröder, ‘The Holy Roman Empire as model for Saint-Pierre’s Projet pour rendre la paix perpétuelle en Europe  ’, in Evans and Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, pp.35–50; M. Wrede, ‘Frankreich, das Reich und die deutsche Nation im 17. und 18. Jahrhundert’, in G. Schmidt (ed.), Die deutsche Nation im frühneuzeitlichen Europa (Munich, 2010), pp.157–77.

CHAPTER 4: LANDS

1. The following extends Peter Moraw’s analysis of the later Middle Ages into a general model for the Empire’s history: ‘Landesgeschichte und Reichsgeschichte im 14. Jahrhundert’, Jahrbuch für westdeutsche Landesgeschichte, 3 (1977), 175–91, and his ‘Franken als königsnahe Landschaft im späten Mittelalter’, BDLG, 112 (1976), 123–38. The relationship of geography to governance is explored further in Part III.

2. H. K. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), III, pp.73–83.

3. F. Trautz, ‘Die Reichsgewalt in Italien im Spätmittelalter’, Heidelberger Jahrbücher, 7 (1963), 45–81 at 54–5.

4. R. Pauler, Die deutschen Könige und Italien im 14. Jahrhundert von Heinrich VII. bis Karl IV. (Darmstadt, 1997), pp.67–8; R. Elze, ‘Die “Eiserne Krone” in Monza’, in P. E. Schramm, Herrschaftszeichen und Staatssymbolik (3 vols., Stuttgart, 1954–6), II, pp.450–79. Napoleon used the Monza crown in 1805, as did Ferdinand I of Austria in 1838. It was also used in the funeral processions for the Italian kings Victor Emanuel II (1878) and Umberto I (1900). The German and imperial insignia are discussed on pp.267–9.

5. E. Schubert, Fürstliche Herrschaft und Territorium im späten Mittelalter (2nd ed., Munich, 2006), p.1. The emergence of a distinct German identity is discussed on pp.255–65. A detailed guide to the historical development of the German territories and regions is provided by G. Köbler, Historisches Lexikon der deutschen Länder (5th ed., Munich, 1995).

6. Das Land Baden-Württemberg (issued by the Staatliche Archivverwaltung Baden-Württembergs, Stuttgart, 1974), I, pp.109–66; T. Zotz, ‘Ethnogenese und Herzogtum in Alemannien (9.–11. Jh.)’, MIÖG, 108 (2000), 48–66.

7. M. Todd, The Early Germans (2nd ed., Oxford, 2004), pp.202–10.

8. M. Spindler (ed.), Handbuch der bayerische Geschichte (2nd ed., 2 vols., Munich, 1981), I, pp.101–245; S. Airlie, ‘Narratives of triumph and rituals of submission: Charlemagne’s mastering of Bavaria’, TRHS, 6th series, 9 (1999), 93–119.

9. G. Scheibelreiter, ‘Ostarrichi. Das Werden einer historischen Landschaft’, in W. Brauneder and L. Höbelt (eds.), Sacrum Imperium. Das Reich und Österreich, 996–1806 (Vienna, 1996), pp.9–70; H. Dienst, ‘Ostarrîchi – Oriens–Austria. Probleme “österreichischer” Identität im Hochmittelalter’, in R. G. Plaschka et al. (eds.), Was heißt Österreich?(Vienna, 1995), pp.35–50. The term ‘Ostarrichi’ has been documented since 996.

10. C. Wickham, Early Medieval Italy: Central Power and Local Society, 400–1000 (Ann Arbor, MI, 1981), pp.47–63, 168–80; E. Hlawitschka, ‘Die Widonen im Dukat von Spoleto’, Quellen und Forschungen aus italienischen Archiven und Bibliotheken, 63 (1983), 20–92. Adalbert of Magdeburg’s account of Otto’s campaign can be found in S. MacLean (ed.), History and Politics in Late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe (Manchester, 2009), pp.251–71.

11. C. Brühl, Deutschland – Frankreich (Cologne, 1990), pp.677–8. More detail in H. Wolfram, Conrad II, 990–1039: Emperor of Three Kingdoms (University Park, PA, 2006), pp.95–113, 118–37.

12. A. Haverkamp, ‘Die Städte im Herrschafts- und Sozialgefüge Reichsitaliens’, in F. Vittinghoff (ed.), Stadt und Herrschaft. Römische Kaiserzeit und hohes Mittelalter (Munich, 1982), pp.149–245 at 159–66.

13. H. H. Anton, ‘Bonifaz von Canossa, Markgraf von Tuszien, und die Italienpolitik der frühen Salier’, HZ, 214 (1974), 529–56. See generally S. Reynolds, Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe, 900–1300 (2nd ed., Oxford, 1997), pp.240–49.

14. B. Guenée, States and Rulers in Later Medieval Europe (Oxford, 1985), pp.12–13; T. Scott, The City-State in Europe, 1000–1600 (Oxford, 2012), pp. 78–91; D. Hay and J. Law, Italy in the Age of the Renaissance, 1380–1530 (London, 1989), pp.225–6, 260–75.

15. P. Partner, The Lands of St Peter: The Papal State in the Middle Ages and the Early Renaissance (London, 1972). The Pentapolis were Rimini, Pesaro, Fano, Senigallia and Ancona.

16. T. Gross, Lothar III. und die Mathildischen Güter (Frankfurt am Main, 1990).

17. Wickham, Early Medieval Italy, pp.49, 146–63.

18. B. M. Kreutz, Before the Normans: Southern Italy in the Ninth and Tenth Centuries (Philadelphia, 1991), pp.37–47, 102–6, 119–25; T. Reuter, Germany in the Early Middle Ages, c.800–1056 (Harlow, 1991), pp.173–4.

19. F. Neveux, A Brief History of the Normans (London, 2008); G. A. Loud, The Age of Robert Guiscard: Southern Italy and the Norman Conquest (Harlow, 2000); D. Matthew, The Norman Kingdom of Sicily (Cambridge, 1992).

20. I. S. Robinson, The Papacy, 1073–1198 (Cambridge, 1990), pp.367–97.

21. T. Ertl, ‘Der Regierungsantritt Heinrichs VI. im Königreich Sizilien (1194)’, FMS, 37 (2003), 259–89. For the wider speculation about Henry’s plans see pp.303–4.

22. T. Frenz, ‘Das Papsttum als der lachende Dritte? Die Konsolidierung der weltlichen Herrschaft der Päpste unter Innozenz III.’, in W. Hechberger and F. Schuller (eds.), Staufer & Welfen (Regensburg, 2009), pp.190–201.

23. Hay and Law, Italy, pp.149–58, 236–60. The pope also had more direct control over the duchy of Benevento, which had shrunk to the town of that name.

24. S. A. Epstein, Genoa and the Genoese, 958–1528 (Chapel Hill, NC, 1996); J. Larner, Italy in the Age of Dante and Petrarch, 1216–1380 (London, 1980), pp.128–52; Scott, City-State, pp.51–6, 64–78, 92–128. See also pp.512–22.

25. E. L. Cox, The Eagles of Savoy: The House of Savoy in Thirteenth-Century Europe (Princeton, 1974), and his The Green Count of Savoy: Amadeus VI and Transalpine Savoy in the Fourteenth Century (Princeton, 1967). Savoy was raised to a duchy in 1416. Its relationship to the Empire is discussed at length in NTSR, I, 46–52, 72–84.

26. As argued by J. Schneider, Auf der Suche nach dem verlorenen Reich. Lotharingien im 9. und 10. Jahrhundert (Cologne, 2010). For the following see also B. Schneidmüller, ‘Regnum und ducatus. Identität und Integration in der lotharingischen Geschichte des 9. bis 11. Jahrhunderts’, RVJB, 51 (1987), 81–114; R. McKitterick, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians (Harlow, 1983), pp.258–75.

27. Todd, The Early Germans, pp.197–201.

28. Thietmar of Merseburg, Ottonian Germany: The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg, ed. D. A. Warner (Manchester, 2001), pp.325–8.

29. E. Boshof, Die Salier (5th ed., Stuttgart, 2008), pp.63–70; T. Riches, ‘The Peace of God, the “weakness” of Robert the Pious and the struggle for the German throne, 1023–5’, EME, 18 (2010), 202–22 at 212–16; Wolfram, Conrad II, pp.239–46; Brühl, Deutschland – Frankreich, pp.672–9.

30. S. Weinfurter, The Salian Century (Philadelphia, 1999), p.50.

31. Boshof, Die Salier, pp.113–16.

32. F. Seibt, Karl IV. (Munich, 1978), pp.350–60.

33. G. Althoff, Die Ottonen (2nd ed., Stuttgart, 2005), pp.49–52, 92–3; M. Werner, ‘Der Herzog von Lothringen in salischer Zeit’, in S. Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich (3 vols., Sigmaringen, 1991), I, pp.367–473; Schneidmüller, ‘Regnum und ducatus’, pp.89–91.

34. E. Boshof, ‘Lothringen, Frankreich und das Reich in der Regierungszeit Heinrichs III.’, RVJB, 42 (1978), 63–127.

35. H. Thomas, ‘Die lehnrechtlichen Beziehungen des Herzogtums Lothringen zum Reich von der Mitte des 13. bis zum Ende des 14. Jahrhunderts’, RVJB, 38 (1974), 166–202; H. Bogdan, La Lorraine des ducs (Condé-sur-l’Escaut, 2007), pp.47–62; F. Pesendorfer, Lothringen und seine Herzöge (Graz, 1994), pp.55–8. Pont-à-Mousson was acquired with the county (later duchy) of Bar to the north-west of Lorraine itself in the fourteenth century. Bar had owed feudal obligations to France since 1301, while Pont-à-Mousson had been an imperial fief since 1354. Although he released the duke from obligations owed by Lorraine, Charles reasserted suzerainty over Metz, Toul and Verdun in 1356. Lorraine eventually passed to the Vaudemont family in 1501.

36. M. Innes, ‘Franks and Slavs c.700–1000: The problem of European expansion before the millennium’, EME, 6 (1997), 201–16; H. Keller, ‘Das “Erbe” Ottos des Großen’, FMS, 41 (2007), 43–74 at 56–7.

37. C. R. Bowlus, The Battle of Lechfeld and its Aftermath, August 955 (Aldershot, 2006), pp.19–44 (on Magyar tactics); T. Reuter (ed.), The Annals of Fulda (Manchester, 1992), pp.23, 88–98, 121–3 (on the Slavs); Neveux, A Brief History of the Normans, pp.24–37.

38. S. Coupland, ‘The Frankish tribute payments to the Vikings and their consequences’, Francia, 26 (1999), 57–75.

39. J. M. H. Smith, ‘Fines imperii: The marches’, in R. McKitterick (ed.), The New Cambridge Medieval History, II, c.700–c.900 (Cambridge, 1995), pp.169–89; H. Büttner, ‘Die Ungarn, das Reich und Europa bis zur Lechfeldschlacht des Jahres 955’, ZBLG, 19 (1956), 433–58.

40. Althoff, Die Ottonen, pp.53–5; M. Hardt, ‘The Limes Saxoniae as part of the eastern borderlands of the Frankish and Ottonian-Salian Empire’, in F. Curta (ed.), Borders, Barriers and Ethnogenesis (Turnhout, 2005), pp.35–50; D. S. Bachrach, Warfare in Tenth-Century Germany (Wood-bridge, 2012), pp.23–36, 59–60, 92–101.

41. N. Davies, God’s Playground: A History of Poland (2nd ed., 2 vols., Oxford, 2005), I, pp.54–5.

42. G. Althoff, Otto III (Philadelphia, 2003), pp.46–8; J. Petersohn, ‘König Otto III. und die Slawen an Ostsee, Oder und Elbe um das Jahr 995’, FMS, 37 (2003), 99–139.

43. C. R. Bowlus, Franks, Moravians and Magyars: The Struggle for the Middle Danube, 788–907 (Philadelphia, 1995); F. Curta, Southeastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 500–1250 (Cambridge, 2006); Reuter, Germany in the Early Middle Ages, pp.79–84.

44. Reuter (ed.), The Annals of Fulda, pp.58–61; Reuter, Germany in the Early Middle Ages, pp.82–4. The exact location of the Greater Moravian Empire remains a matter of some controversy.

45. L. Scales, The Shaping of German Identity (Cambridge, 2012), p.408; F. Prinz, ‘Die Stellung Böhmens im mittelalterlichen deutschen Reich’, ZBLG, 28 (1965), 99–113.

46. The exception was Eger (Cheb), acquired by the Staufer in the 1160s to secure access into western Bohemia, but pawned to that kingdom in 1322.

47. Davies, God’s Playground, I, pp.52–8, 70.

48. H. Ludat, An Elbe und Oder um das Jahr 1000. Skizzen zur Politik des Ottonenreiches und der slavischen Mächte in Mitteleuropa (Vienna, 1995); J. Fried, Otto III. und Boleslaw Chrobry (Stuttgart, 1989); Althoff, Otto III, pp.97–107. The historical controversy surrounding Otto’s actions is summarized by D. A. Warner’s introduction to Thietmar of Merseburg, Chronicon, pp.21–6.

49. K. Leyser, ‘The battle at the Lech, 955’, History, 50 (1965), 1–25 at 4; J. Bérenger, A History of the Habsburg Empire, 1273–1700 (Harlow, 194), pp.45–6.

50. S. Gawlas, ‘Der Blick von Polen auf das mittelalterliche Reich’, in B. Schneidmüller and S. Weinfurter (eds.), Heilig – Römisch – Deutsch. Das Reich im mittelalterlichen Europa (Dresden, 2006), pp.266–85. See generally N. Berend et al., Central Europe in the High Middle Ages (Cambridge, 2013).

51. Althoff, Die Ottonen, p.208. For the following see also Reuter, Germany in the Early Middle Ages, pp.260–64.

52. A. Begert, Böhmen, die böhmische Kur und das Reich vom Hochmittelalter bis zum Ende des Alten Reiches (Husum, 2003). The changes to vassalage are discussed on pp.356–65.

53. L. E. Scales, ‘At the margin of community: Germans in pre-Hussite Bohemia’, TRHS, 6th series, 9 (1999), 327–52.

54. H. Aubin et al. (eds.), Geschichte Schlesiens, I, Von der Urzeit bis zum Jahre 1526 (3rd ed., Stuttgart, 1961).

55. Scales, German Identity, pp.431–7 (quote from p.436). Prussia’s controversial historiography is discussed in M. Weber (ed.), Preussen in Ostmitteleuropa (Munich, 2003). For the Order’s foundation see pp.97–9.

56. H. Boockmann, Ostpreußen und Westpreußen (Berlin, 1992), pp.94–5; E. E. Stengel, Abhandlungen und Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des Kaisergedankens im Mittelalter (Cologne, 1965), pp.207–37.

57. Gawlas, ‘Der Blick von Polen’, 280–85. For Polish Prussia see K. Friedrich, The Other Prussia: Royal Prussia, Poland and Liberty, 1569–1772 (Cambridge, 2000). For the following see W. Hubatsch, ‘Albert of Brandenburg-Ansbach, Grand Master of the Order of Teutonic Knights and duke in Prussia, 1490–1568’, in H. J. Cohn (ed.),Government in Reformation Europe, 1520–1560 (London, 1971), pp.169–202; F. L. Carsten, The Origins of Prussia (Oxford, 1954), pp.1–100; D. Kirby, Northern Europe in the Early Modern Period: The Baltic World, 1492–1772 (Harlow, 1990), pp.66–73.

58. A. V. Berkis, The Reign of Duke James in Courland, 1638–1682 (Lincoln, NB, 1960), p.10. For the following see J. Lavery, Germany’s Northern Challenge: The Holy Roman Empire and the Scandinavian Struggle for the Baltic, 1563–1576 (Boston, 2002), pp.132–41.

59. K. Friedrich and S. Smart (eds.), The Cultivation of Monarchy and the Rise of Berlin: Brandenburg-Prussia, 1700 (Farnham, 2010); C. Clark, ‘When culture meets power: The Prussian coronation of 1701’, in H. Scott and B. Simms (eds.), Cultures of Power in Europe during the Long Eighteenth Century (Cambridge, 2007), pp.14–35;NTSR, I, 111–32.

60. K.-U. Jäschke, Europa und das römisch-deutsche Reich um 1300 (Stuttgart, 1999), pp.39–54; Davies, God’s Playground, I, pp.86–92.

61. R. Butterwick (ed.), The Polish-Lithuanian Monarchy in European Context, c.1500–1795 (Basingstoke, 2001).

62. A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1400–1522 (Vienna, 1996), pp.341–59; W. Zanetti, Der Friedenskaiser. Friedrich III. und seine Zeit, 1440–1493 (Herford, 1985), pp.130–208, 275–338.

63. K. V. Jensen, ‘The blue Baltic border of Denmark in the high Middle Ages’, in D. Abulafia and N. Berend (eds.), Medieval Frontiers: Concepts and Practices (Aldershot, 2002), pp.173–93; K. Jordan, ‘Heinrich der Löwe und Dänemark’, in M. Göhring and A. Scharff (eds.), Geschichtliche Kräfte und Entscheidungen (Wiesbaden, 1954), pp.16–29 at 17–19.

64. E. Hoffmann, ‘Die Bedeutung der Schlacht von Bornhöved für die deutsche und skandinavische Geschichte’, Zeitschrift des Vereins für Lübeckische Geschichte und Altertumskunde, 57 (1977), 9–37. The Hansa are discussed on pp.570–71, 577–8.

65. A. Bihrer, Begegnungen zwischen dem ostfränkisch-deutschen Reich und England (850–1100) (Ostfildern, 2012); K. Leyser, ‘Die Ottonen und Wessex’, FMS, 17 (1983), 73–97; J. Sarnowsky, ‘England und der Kontinent im 10. Jahrhundert’, HJb, 114 (1994), 47–75.

66. K. Leyser, Medieval Germany and its Neighbours, 900–1250 (London, 1982), pp.191–213.

67. K. Görich, ‘Verletzte Ehre. König Richard Löwenherz als Gefanger Kaiser Heinrichs VI’, HJb, 123 (2003), 65–91; J. Gillingham, ‘The kidnapped king: Richard I in Germany, 1192–4’, GHIL, 30 (2008), 5–34. The Staufer–Welf conflict is discussed further on pp.357–9.

68. B. K. U. Weiler, Henry III of England and the Staufen Empire, 1216–1272 (Woodbridge, 2006), p.198. Richard’s reign as German king is discussed further on pp.378–9.

69. J. Whaley, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, 1493–1806 (2 vols., Oxford, 2012), I, p.340. Some of these issues will be picked up in more detail on pp.255–65, 668–78.

70. For a geographical survey of the Kreise, see P. H. Wilson, From Reich to Revolution: German History, 1558–1806 (Basingstoke, 2004), pp.185–90, with a full membership list of each on pp.364–77. Further discussion on p.403.

71. HHStA, Titel und Wappen, Kart.2.

72. P. D. Lockhart, Frederick II and the Protestant Cause: Denmark’s Role in the Wars of Religion, 1559–1596 (Leiden, 2004), and his Denmark in the Thirty Years’ War, 1618–1648 (Selinsgrove, 1996).

73. W. Carr, Schleswig-Holstein, 1815–1848 (Manchester, 1963); G. Stolz, Die Schleswig-holsteinische Erhebung. Die nationale Auseinandersetzung in und um Schleswig-Holstein von 1848/51 (Husum, 1996).

74. W. Buchholz, ‘Schwedisch-Pommern als Territorium des deutschen Reichs 1648–1806’, ZNRG, 12 (1990), 14–33; B. C. Fiedler, ‘Schwedisch oder Deutsch? Die Herzogtümer Bremen und Verden in der Schwedenzeit (1645–1712)’, Niedersächsisches Jahrbuch für Landesgeschichte, 67 (1995), 43–57; K. R. Böhme, ‘Die Krone Schweden als Reichsstand 1648 bis 1720’, in H. Duchhardt (ed.), Europas Mitte (Bonn, 1988), pp.33–9.

75. G. Pálffy, ‘An “old empire” on the periphery of the Old Empire: The kingdom of Hungary and the Holy Roman Empire in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries’, in R. J. W. Evans and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806: A European Perspective (Leiden, 2012), pp. 259–79 at 271. For Habsburg government and the Empire’s financial and military involvement in Hungary’s defence, see also pp.445–62.

76. M. Hengerer, Kaiserhof und Adel in der Mitte des 17. Jahrhunderts (Konstanz, 2004).

77. W. Eberhard, Monarchie und Widerstand. Zur ständischen Oppositions-bildung im Herrschaftssystem Ferdinands I. in Böhmen (Munich, 1985).

78. Begert, Böhmen, die böhmische Kur und das Reich, pp.442–76. For the following see also J. Pánek, ‘Der böhmische Staat und das Reich in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in V. Press (ed.), Alternativen zur Reichsverfassung in der Frühen Neuzeit? (Munich, 1995), pp.169–78; P. Maa, ‘Der Adel aus den böhmischen Ländern am Kaiserhof 1620–1740’, in V. Bu̇žek and P. Král (eds.), Šlechta v habsburské monarchii a císařsky dvu̇r (1526–1740) (České Budějovice, 2003), pp.191–233, and his ‘Bohemia, Silesia and the Empire: Negotiating princely dignity on the eastern periphery’, in Evans and Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, pp.143–65.

79. H. Noflascher, ‘Deutschmeister und Regent der Vorlande. Maximilian von Österreich (1558–1618)’, in H. Maier and V. Press (eds.), Vorderösterreich in der frühen Neuzeit (Sigmaringen, 1989), pp.93–130 at 101–6. For the following see R. Rexheuser (ed.), Die Personalunionen von Sachsen-Polen 1697–1763 und Hannover-England, 1714–1837 (Wiesbaden, 2005); B. Simms and T. Riotte (eds.), The Hanoverian Dimension in British History, 1714–1837 (Cambridge, 2007); J. Black, The British Abroad: The Grand Tour in the Eighteenth Century (Stroud, 1992); N. Harding, Hanover and the British Empire, 1700–1837 (Woodbridge, 2007); K. Lembke and C. Vogel (gen. eds.),Als die Royals aus Hannover kamen (4 vols., Dresden, 2014); D. Makiłła, ‘Friedliche Nachbarschaft. Das Bild des Reiches in der polnischen Geschichtsschreibung’, in M. Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum – irregulare corpus – Teutscher Reichs-Staat (Mainz, 2002), pp.221–9; H.-J. Bömelburg, ‘Polen und die deutsche Nation – Konfligierende Identitätszuschreibungen und antagonistische Entwürfe politischer Ordnung’, in G. Schmidt (ed.), Die deutsche Nation im frühneuzeitlichen Europa (Munich, 2010), pp.129–55.

80. Whaley, Germany, I, p.21.

81. C. W. Ingrao, In Quest and Crisis: Emperor Joseph I and the Habsburg Monarchy (West Lafayette, IN, 1979), pp.79–121 esp. 96–7; G. Schmidt, Geschichte des Alten Reiches (Munich, 1999), p.200.

82. L. Riall, The Italian Risorgimento: State, Society and National Unification (London, 1994).

83. B. Raviola, ‘The imperial system in early modern northern Italy: A web of dukedoms, fiefs and enclaves along the Po’, in Evans and Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, pp.217–36, and the articles in the special issue of Zeitenblicke, 6 (2007), no.1, at http//www.zeitenblicke.de/2007/1 (accessed 22 October 2009).

84. K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Das Reich. Friedensordnung und europäisches Gleichgewicht, 1648–1806 (Stuttgart, 1986), pp.84–5, 159, 281.

85. T. J. Dandelet, Spanish Rome, 1500–1700 (New Haven, CT, 2001), pp.56–7.

86. For the strategic context see G. Parker, The Army of Flanders and the Spanish Road, 1567–1659 (Cambridge, 1972); P. H. Wilson, Europe’s Tragedy: A History of the Thirty Years War (London, 2009), pp.151–61.

87. M. Schnettger, ‘Impero Romano – Impero Germanico. Italienische Perspektiven auf das Reich in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum, pp.53–75 at 59–66; Aretin, Das Reich, pp.88–99. The Reichshofrat is discussed further on pp.627–31.

88. F. Edelmayer, Maximilian II., Philipp II. und Reichsitalien. Die Auseinandersetzungen um das Reichslehen Finale in Ligurien (Stuttgart, 1988); D. Parrott, ‘The Mantuan Succession, 1627–31: A sovereignty dispute in early modern Europe’, EHR, 112 (1997), 20–65.

89. J. P. Niederkorn, Die europäischen Mächte und der ‘Lange Türkenkrieg’ Kaiser Rudolfs II. (1593–1606) (Vienna, 1993), pp.386–448; C. Storrs, ‘Imperial authority and the levy of contributions in “Reichsitalien” in the Nine Years War (1690–1696)’, in M. Schnettger and M. Verga (eds.), L’Impero e l’Italia nella prima età moderna(Bologna, 2006), pp.241–73; M. Schnettger, ‘Das Alte Reich und Italien in der Frühen Neuzeit’, Quellen und Forschungen aus italienischen Archiven und Bibliotheken, 79 (1999), 344–420 at 359–64; G. Hanlon, Twilight of a Military Tradition: Italian Aristocrats and European Conflicts, 1560–1800 (London, 1998).

90. K. Müller, ‘Das “Reichskammerale” im 18. Jahrhundert’, Wiener Beiträge zur Geschichte der Neuzeit, 30 (1993), 152–77 at 159–60.

91. R. Oresko, ‘The House of Savoy in search for a royal crown in the seventeenth century’, in R. Oresko et al. (eds.), Royal and Republican Sovereignty in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge, 1997), pp.272–350. For the following see also R. Oresko and R. Parrott, ‘Reichsitalien and the Thirty Years’ War’, in K. Bussmann and H. Schilling (eds.),1648: War and Peace in Europe (3 vols., Münster, 1998), I, pp.141–60; C. Zwierlein, ‘Savoyen-Piemonts Verhältnis zum Reich 1536 bis 1618’, in Schnettger and Verga (eds.), L’Impero, pp.347–89; S. Externbrink, ‘State-building within the Empire: The cases of Brandenburg-Prussia and Savoy-Sardinia’, in Evans and Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, pp.187–202.

92. R. Kleinman, ‘Charles-Emmanuel I of Savoy and the Bohemian election of 1619’, European Studies Review, 5 (1975), 3–29; L. Pelizaeus, Der Aufstieg Württembergs und Hessens zur Kurwürde, 1692–1803 (Frankfurtam Main, 2000), pp.53–4.

93. N. Mout, ‘Core and periphery: The Netherlands and the Empire from the late fifteenth to the early seventeenth century’, in Evans and Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, pp.203–15.

94. H. Gabel, ‘Ein verkanntes System? Das Alte Reich im zeitgenössischen niederländischen Urteil’, in Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum, pp.111–34; A. C. Carter, Neutrality or Commitment: The Evolution of Dutch Foreign Policy, 1667–1795 (London, 1975). See generally J. I. Israel, The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness and Fall, 1477–1806 (Oxford, 1995).

95. R. Babel, Zwischen Habsburg und Bourbon. Außenpolitik und europäische Stellung Herzog Karl IV. von Lothringen und Bar von Regierungsantritt bis zum Exil (1624–1634) (Sigmaringen, 1989); H. Wolf, Die Reichskirchenpolitik des Hauses Lothringen (1680–1715) (Stuttgart, 1994); Pesendorfer, Lotharingen, pp.99–177.

96. D. Croxton, ‘The Peace of Westphalia of 1648 and the origins of sovereignty’, IHR, 21 (1999), 569–91 at 576–7; F. Egger, ‘Johann Rudolf Wettstein and the international recognition of Switzerland as a European nation’, in Bussmann and Schilling (eds.), 1648: War and Peace, I, pp.423–32; T. Maissen, ‘Die Eidgenossen und die deutsche Nation in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in Schmidt (ed.), Die deutsche Nation, pp.97–127.

97. M. Jorio, ‘Der Nexus Imperii – Die Eidgenossenschaft und das Reich nach 1648’, in idem (ed.), 1648: Die Schweiz und Europa (Zurich, 1999), pp.133–46 at 133–4.

CHAPTER 5: IDENTITIES

1. For a lucid and comprehensive guide to these debates, see L. Scales, The Shaping of German Identity (Cambridge, 2012), pp.1–52, and the literature cited in the Introduction. Reactions to the Empire’s dissolution are discussed on pp.655–7.

2. B. Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin of the Spread of Nationalism (London, 1983); E. J. Hobsbawm, Nations and Nationalism since 1780: Programme, Myth, Reality (2nd ed., Cambridge, 1992). Further discussion in W. Pohl (ed.) with H. Reimitz, Strategies of Distinction: The Construction of Ethnic Communities, 300–800 (Leiden, 1998); S. Forde et al. (eds.), Concepts of National Identity in the Middle Ages (Leeds, 1995).

3. S. Reynolds, Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe, 900–1300 (2nd ed., Oxford, 1997), pp.250–331; C. Brühl, Deutschland – Frankreich (Cologne, 1990), esp. p.714.

4. V. Groebner, Who Are You? Identification, Deception, and Surveillance in Early Modern Europe (New York, 2007), pp.26–7.

5. C. Beaune, The Birth of an Ideology: Myths and Symbols of Nation in Late-Medieval France (Berkeley, 1991); C. L-bke, Fremde im östlichen Europa. Von Gesellschaften ohne Staat zu verstaatlichten Gesellschaften (9.–11. Jahrhundert) (Cologne, 2001); F. Graus, Die Nationenbildung der Westslawen im Mittelalter (Sigmaringen, 1980), esp. p.142.

6. H.-W. Goetz, ‘Regnum. Zum politischen Denken der Karolingerzeit’, ZSRG GA, 104 (1987), 110–89 esp. 117, 171.

7. M. Todd, The Early Germans (2nd ed., Oxford, 2004), pp.1–11, 242–54; H. K. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), I, pp.11–35.

8. P. Blickle, ‘Untertanen in der Frühneuzeit’, VSWG, 70 (1983), 483–522 at 484–8. For the following see J. Henderson, The Medieval World of Isidore of Seville (Cambridge, 2007); S. MacLean, ‘Insinuation, censorship and the struggle for late Carolingian Lotharingia in Regino of Prüm’s chronicle’, EHR, 124 (2009), 1–28; R. Bartlett, ‘Medieval and modern concepts of race and ethnicity’, Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 31 (2001), 39–56.

9. C. Hirschi, The Origins of Nationalism (Cambridge, 2012), pp.62–82; U. Nonn, ‘Heiliges Römisches Reich deutscher Nation. Zum Nationen-Begriff im 15. Jahrhundert’, ZHF, 9 (1982), 129–42.

10. K. F. Werner, ‘Das hochmittelalterliche Imperium im politischen Bewusstsein Frankreichs (10.–12. Jahrhundert)’, HZ, 200 (1965), 1–60 at 16–17; Todd, Early Germans, pp.179–80.

11. B. Arnold, Princes and Territories in Medieval Germany (Cambridge, 1991), pp.66–7; R. Collins, Early Medieval Europe, 300–1000 (Basingstoke, 1991), pp.274–7; R. Bartlett, The Making of Europe (London, 1993), pp.204–20; Schulze, Grundstrukturen, I, pp.23–5, 108.

12. J. Ehlers, ‘Methodische Überlegungen zur Entstehung des deutschen Reiches im Mittelalter und zur nachwanderzeitlichen Nationenbildung’, in C. Brühl and B. Schneidmüller (eds.), Beiträge zur mittelalterlichen Reichs- und Nationsbildung in Deutschland und Frankreich (Munich, 1997), pp.1–13.

13. K. Leyser, ‘The German aristocracy from the ninth to the early twelfth century’, P&P, 41 (1968), 25–53; K. F. Werner, ‘Important noble families in the kingdom of Charlemagne’, in T. Reuter (ed.), The Medieval Nobility (Amsterdam, 1978), pp.137–202.

14. H.-W. Goetz, ‘Das Herzogtum im Spiegel der salierzeitlichen Geschichtsschreibung’, in S. Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich (3 vols., Sigmaringen, 1991), I, pp.253–71, doubts the persistence of some kind of ‘tribal’ identity, but others present convincing evidence for regionally bounded identities: O. Engels, ‘Der Reich der Salier’, in ibid, III, pp.479–541 at 479–514.

15. L. Körntgen, Ottonen und Salier (3rd ed., Darmstadt, 2010), pp.1–3.

16. L. Gall, Von der ständischen zur bürgerlichen Gesellschaft (Munich, 1993); A. Haverkamp, Medieval Germany, 1056–1273 (Oxford, 1988), pp.78–92, 198–211; G. Tellenbach, The Church in Western Europe from the Tenth to the Early Twelfth Century (Cambridge, 1993), pp.122–34; D. Saalfeld, ‘Die ständische Gliederung der Gesellschaft Deutschlands im Zeitalter des Absolutismus’, VSWG, 67 (1980), 457–83. For the European perspective see B. Guenée, States and Rulers in Later Medieval Europe (Oxford, 1985), pp.157–70. The demographic and economic changes are explored further on pp.487–98.

17. J. Laudage and Y. Leiverkus (eds.), Rittertum und höfische Kultur der Stauferzeit (Cologne, 2006), esp. the introduction; H. Wolfram, Conrad II, 990–1039 (University Park, PA, 2006), pp.169–75; J. B. Freed, ‘Nobles, ministerials and knights in the archdiocese of Salzburg’, Speculum, 62 (1987), 575–611; J. Bumke, The Concept of Knighthood in the Middle Ages (New York, 1982); L. Silver, Marketing Maximilian: The Visual Ideology of a Holy Roman Emperor (Princeton, 2008), p.163; H. Wiesflecker, Kaiser Maximilian I. (5 vols., Vienna, 1971–86), I, p.176, V, p.518.

18. K. Leyser, Medieval Germany and its Neighbours, 900–1250 (London, 1982), pp.161–89; H. Keller, ‘Die soziale und politische Verfassung Mailands in den Anfängen des kommunalen Lebens’, HZ, 211 (1970), 34–64 esp. 41–9.

19. B. Tolley, Pastors and Parishioners in Württemberg during the Late Reformation, 1581–1621 (Stanford, 1995).

20. F. Geisthardt, ‘Peter Melander, Graf zu Holzappel, 1589–1648’, Nassauische Lebensbilder, 4 (1950), 36–53.

21. H. Zmora, The Feud in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 2011), pp.100–110, 133–4; H. Watanabe-O’Kelly, ‘War and politics in early seventeenth-century Germany: The tournaments of the Protestant Union’, in Centro di Studi Storici, Narni (ed.), La civiltà del torneo (sec. XII–XVII) (Rome, 1990), pp.231–45; and the chapters by L. Ognois and A. Seeliger-Zeiss in A. Ernst and A. Schindling (eds.), Union und Liga 1608/09 (Stuttgart, 2010). Urban charters are discussed on pp.507, 513–14.

22. P. Blickle, The Revolution of 1525 (2nd ed., Baltimore, 1985); J. G. Gagliardo, From Pariah to Patriot: The Changing Image of the German Peasant, 1770–1840 (Lexington, KY, 1969). The identity of the ‘common man’ is discussed on pp.501, 579–80.

23. O. P. Clavadetscher, ‘Nobilis, edel, fry’, in H. Beumann (ed.), Historische Forschungen für Walter Schlesinger (Cologne, 1974), pp.242–51. Early modern examples of efforts to maintain status distinctions in NTSR, XIII, part I, 917–18, 920; XIV, 384–7.

24. H. Wunder, He is the Sun, she is the Moon: Women in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, MA, 1998), p.188.

25. Quoted by Gall, Von der ständischen zur bürgerlichen Gesellschaft, p.7.

26. M. Hochedlinger, ‘Mars ennobled: The ascent of the military and the creation of a military nobility in mid-eighteenth-century Austria’, GH, 17 (1999), 141–76.

27. C. Dipper, Deutsche Geschichte, 1648–1789 (Frankfurt am Main, 1991), pp.77–80; G. Schmidt, Wandel durch Vernunft. Deutsche Geschichte im 18. Jahrhundert (Munich, 2009), pp.291–325; O. Mörke, ‘Social structure’, in S. Ogilvie (ed.), Germany: A New Social and Economic History, II, 1630–1800 (London, 1996), pp.134–63 esp. 136–7, 148.

28. H. J. Cohn, ‘Anticlericalism in the German Peasants’ War 1525’, P&P, 83 (1979), 3–31; K. Bleeck and J. Garber, ‘Nobilitas. Standes- und Privilegienlegitimation in deutschen Adelstheorien des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts’, Daphnis, 11 (1982), 49–114; M. Kaiser, ‘“Ist er vom adel? Ja. Id satis videtur”. Adlige Standesqualität und militärische Leistung als Karrierefaktoren in der Epoche des Dreißigjährigen Krieges’, in F. Bosbach et al. (eds.), Geburt oder Leistung? (Munich, 2003), pp.73–90; H. C. E. Midelfort, ‘Adeliges Landleben und die Legitimationskrise des deutschen Adels im 16. Jahrhundert’, in G. Schmidt (ed.), Stände und Gesellschaft im Alten Reich (Stuttgart, 1989), pp.245–64. For the following see also E. Schubert, ‘Adel im ausgehenden 18. Jahrhundert’, in J. Canning and H. Wellenreuther (eds.), Britain and Germany Compared (Göttingen, 2001), pp.141–229 at 144–9.

29. Wolfram, Conrad II, pp.322–4.

30. G. Franz, Geschichte des deutschen Bauernstandes vom frühen Mittelalter bis zum 19. Jahrhundert (Stuttgart, 1970), pp.26–7; M. Costambeys et al., The Carolingian World (Cambridge, 2011), pp.275–323. For the following see also J. A. Brundage, Law, Sex and Christian Society in Medieval Europe (Chicago, 1987); J. F. Harrington,Reordering Marriage and Society in Reformation Germany (Cambridge, 1995).

31. J. R. Lyon, Princely Brothers and Sisters: The Sibling Bond in German Politics, 1100–1250 (Ithaca, NY, 2012); W. Störmer, Früher Adel. Studien zur politischen Führungsschicht im fränkisch-deutschen Reich vom 8. bis 11. Jahrhundert (2 vols., Stuttgart, 1973).

32. K. Görich, Die Staufer. Herrscher und Reich (2nd ed., Munich, 2008), p.20.

33. H. Keller, Die Ottonen (4th ed., Munich, 2008), pp.16–17; K. Schmid, ‘Zum Haus- und Herrschaftsverständnis der Salier’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier, I, pp.21–34.

34. N. Schindler, Rebellion, Community and Custom in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 2002), pp.51–84; Bartlett, Making of Europe, pp.270–80.

35. M. Innes, State and Society in the Early Middle Ages: The Middle Rhine Valley, 400–1000 (Cambridge, 2000), pp.30–40; H. J. Hummer, Politics and Power in Early Medieval Europe: Alsace and the Frankish Realm, 600–1000 (Cambridge, 2005), p.257; J. B. Freed, ‘Reflections on the early medieval German nobility’, AHR, 91 (1986), 553–75 at 563.

36. D. Abulafia, ‘Introduction’, in idem and N. Berend (eds.), Medieval Frontiers (Aldershot, 2002), pp.1–34; R. J. W. Evans, Austria, Hungary, and the Habsburgs (Oxford, 2006), pp.114–33.

37. F. Prinz, ‘Die Grenzen des Reiches in frühsalischer Zeit’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier, I, pp.159–73; G. Lubich, ‘Früh- und hochmittelalterlicher Adel zwischen Tauber und Neckar. Genese und Prägung adliger Herrschaftsräume im fränkisch-schwäbischen Grenzgebiet’, in S. Lorenz and S. Molitor (eds.), Herrschaft und Legitimation(Leinfelden-Echterdingen, 2002), pp.13–47.

38. H. Maurer, ‘Confinium Alamannorum. Über Wesen und Bedeutung hochmittelalterlicher “Stammesgrenzen”’, in Beumann (ed.), Historische Forschungen, pp.150–61.

39. M. J. Halvorson and K. E. Spierling, Defining Community in Early Modern Europe (Aldershot, 2008). See also the literature cited in n.2 above and the discussion of communal ideals on pp.498–503.

40. R. Meens, ‘Politics, mirrors of princes and the Bible: Sins, kings and the well-being of the realm’, EME, 7 (1998), 345–57.

41. B. Arnold, ‘Episcopal authority authenticated and fabricated: Form and function in medieval German bishops’ catalogues’, in T. Reuter (ed.), Warriors and Churchmen in the High Middle Ages (London, 1992), pp. 63–78; K. Graf, ‘Feindbild und Vorbild. Bemerkungen zur städtischen Wahrnehmung des Adels’, ZGO, 141 (1993), 121–54; C. Woodford, Nuns as Historians in Early Modern Germany (Oxford, 2002); D. P. Bell, Jewish Identity in Early Modern Germany (Aldershot, 2007), pp.72–98.

42. Y. Mintzker, The Defortification of the German City, 1689–1866 (Cambridge, 2012), pp.11–41. See pp.508–22 for communal self-government.

43. M. Walker, German Home Towns: Community, State and General Estate, 1648–1871 (2nd ed., Ithaca, NY, 1998); C. Applegate, A Nation of Provincials: The German Idea of Heimat (Berkeley, 1990).

44. I. S. Robinson (ed.), Eleventh-Century Germany (Manchester, 2008), p.14. Other examples include Wipo of Burgundy: T. E. Mommsen and K. F. Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters of the Eleventh Century (New York, 2000), p.79, and Thietmar of Merseburg, Ottonian Germany: The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg, ed. D. A. Warner (Manchester, 2001), esp. p.75.

45. Arnold, ‘Episcopal authority’, pp.77–8.

46. Goetz, ‘Regnum’, p.173.

47. K. Friedrich, The Other Prussia: Royal Prussia, Poland and Liberty, 1569–1772 (Cambridge, 2000), pp.71–95.

48. F. Trautz, ‘Die Reichsgewalt in Italien im Spätmittelalter’, Heidelberger Jahrbücher, 7 (1963), 45–81 at 75. See generally B. Schmidt, ‘Mappae Germaniae. Das Alte Reich in der kartographischen Überlieferung der Frühen Neuzeit’, in M. Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum – irregulare corpus – Teutscher Reichs-Staat (Mainz, 2002), pp.3–25.

49. G. Klingenstein, ‘Was bedeuten “Österreich” und “österreichisch” im 18. Jahrhundert?’, in R. G. Plaschka et al. (eds.), Was heißt Österreich? (Vienna, 1995), pp.149–220 at 202–4.

50. E.g. M. Merian, Topographia Germaniae (14 vols., Frankfurt am Main, 1643–75).

CHAPTER 6: NATION

1. H. Weisert, ‘Der Reichstitel bis 1806’, Archiv für Diplomatik, 40 (1994), 441–513; H. K. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), III, pp.50–64.

2. E. Hlawitschka, ‘Vom Ausklingen der fränkischen und Einsetzen der deutschen Geschichte’, in C. Brühl and B. Schneidmüller (eds.), Beiträge zur mittelalterlichen Reichs- und Nationsbildung in Deutschland und Frankreich (Munich, 1997), pp.53–81; M. Becher, Otto der Große (Munich, 2012), pp.257–64.

3. K. Herbers and H. Neuhaus, Das Heilige Römische Reich (Cologne, 2005), p.31.

4. T. Riches, ‘The Carolingian capture of Aachen in 978 and its historiographical footprint’, in P. Fouracre and D. Ganz (eds.), Frankland: The Franks and the World of the Early Middle Ages (Manchester, 2008), pp.191–20.

5. M. Todd, The Early Germans (2nd ed., Oxford, 2004), pp.8–14.

6. E. Müller-Mertens, Regnum Teutonicum. Aufkommen und Verbreitung der deutschen Reichs- und Königsauffassung im früheren Mittelalter (Vienna, 1970).

7. As claimed by D. Nicholas, The Northern Lands: Germanic Europe, c.1270–c.1500 (Oxford, 2009). See the critical review by L. Scales, http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/853 (accessed 1 Sept. 2010).

8. P. Geary, The Myth of Nations: The Medieval Origins of Europe (Princeton, 2002); L. Scales, The Shaping of German Identity: Authority and Crisis, 1245–1414 (Cambridge, 2012), and his ‘Germen militiae: War and German identity in the later Middle Ages’, P&P, 180 (2003), 41–82.

9. S. Wendehorst and S. Westphal (eds.), Lesebuch Altes Reich (Munich, 2006), pp.59–66; NTSR, I, 46.

10. C. J. Wells, German: A Linguistic History to 1945 (Oxford, 1985), pp. 95–125; W. B. Lockwood, An Informal History of the German Language (2nd ed., London, 1976), pp.11–77; R. Bergmann, ‘Deutsche Sprache und römisches Reich im Mittelalter’, in B. Schneidmüller and S. Weinfurter (eds.), Heilig – Römisch – Deutsch. Das Reich im mittelalterlichen Europa (Dresden, 2006), pp.162–84. See generally R. Bartlett, The Making of Europe (London, 1993), pp.198–204.

11. L. Scales, ‘Rose without thorn, eagle without feathers: Nation and power in late medieval England and Germany’, GHIL, 31 (2009), 3–35 at 23–8.

12. M. Prietzel, Das Heilige Römische Reich im Spätmittelalter (2nd ed., Darmstadt, 2010), p.88; P. Burke, Languages and Communities in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge, 2004), esp. pp.79–84.

13. Scales, German Identity, pp.427–30.

14. U. Rublack, Dressing Up: Cultural Identity in Renaissance Europe (Oxford, 2010), pp.10, 265–70; T. Weller, Theatrum Praecedentiae. Zeremonieller Rang und gesellschaftliche Ordnung in der frühneuzeitlichen Stadt: Leipzig, 1500–1800 (Darmstadt, 2006), pp.82–119. For the following see also C. Hirschi, The Origins of Nationalism(Cambridge, 2012), pp.99–118.

15. Quoted in Weller, Theatrum Praecedentiae, p.97.

16. M. von Engelberg, ‘“Deutscher Barock” oder “Barock in Deutschland” – Nur ein Streit um Worte?’, in G. Schmidt (ed.), Die deutsche Nation im frühneuzeitlichen Europa (Munich, 2010), pp.307–34; T. DaCosta Kaufmann, ‘Centres or periphery? Art and architecture in the Empire’, in R. J. W. Evans and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806: A European Perspective (Leiden, 2012), pp.315–32; P. C. Hartmann, Kulturgeschichte des Heiligen Römischen Reiches 1648 bis 1806 (Vienna, 2001).

17. C. Scharf, Katharina II., Deutschland und die Deutschen (Mainz, 1995), pp.55–271; M. North, ‘Nationale und kulturelle Selbstverortung in der Diaspora: Die Deutschen in den russischen Ostseeprovinzen des 18. Jahrhunderts’, in Schmidt (ed.), Die deutsche Nation, pp.83–96; H.-J. Bömelburg, ‘Polen und die deutsche Nation’, in ibid, pp.129–55.

18. J. Whaley, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, 1493–1806 (2 vols., Oxford, 2012), I, pp.53–7; Todd, Early Germans, pp.4–7; Hirschi, Origins of Nationalism, pp.11, 119–79.

19. C. Sieber-Lehmann, ‘“Teutsche Nation” und Eidgenossenschaft. Der Zusammenhang zwischen Türken- und Burgunderkriegen’, HZ, 253 (1991), 561–602; T. Scott, ‘The Reformation between deconstruction and reconstruction’, GH, 26 (2008), 406–22.

20. B. Brandt, ‘Germania in armor: The female representation of an endangered German nation’, in S. Colvin and H. Watanabe-O’Kelly (eds.), Warlike Women in the German Literary and Cultural Imagination since 1500 (Rochester, NY, 2009), pp.86–126; H. Watanabe-O’Kelly, Beauty or Beast? The Woman Warrior in the German Imagination from the Renaissance to the Present (Oxford, 2010), esp. pp.10–11.

21. D. V. N. Bagchi, ‘“Teutschland über alle Welt”: Nationalism and Catholicism in early Reformation Germany’, Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte, 82 (1991), 39–58; K. Manger (ed.), Die Fruchtbringer – eine Teutschherzige Gesellschaft (Heidelberg, 2001).

22. F. Brendle, Der Erzkanzler im Religionskrieg. Kurfürst Anselm Casimir von Mainz, die geistlichen Fürsten und das Reich 1629 bis 1647 (Mainz, 2011), pp.491–7. See generally A. Schmidt, Vaterlandsliebe und Religionskonflikt. Politische Diskurse im Alten Reich (1555–1648) (Leiden, 2007).

23. This is a common tendency, e.g. P. Blickle, Das Alte Europa. Vom Hochmittelalter bis zur Moderne (Munich, 2008), pp.160–62. See more generally W. te Brake, Shaping History: Ordinary People in European Politics, 1500–1700 (Berkeley, 1998); E. Hölzle, Die Idee einer altgermanischen Freiheit vor Montesquieu (Munich, 1925); G. Schmidt, ‘Die “deutsche Freiheit” und der Westfälische Friede’, in R. G. Asch et al. (eds.), Frieden und Krieg in der Frühen Neuzeit (Munich, 2001), pp.323–47.

24. H. Dreitzel, Absolutismus und ständische Verfassung in Deutschland (Mainz, 1992), pp.17, 65–6, 74–5.

25. T. C. W. Blanning, The Culture of Power and the Power of Culture: Old Regime Europe, 1660–1789 (Oxford, 2002), p.66. For the following see the three works by W. Behringer: Im Zeichen des Merkur. Reichspost und Kommunikationsrevolution in der Frühen Neuzeit (Göttingen, 2003); ‘Communications revolutions: A historiographical concept’, GH, 24 (2006), 333–74; ‘Core and periphery: The Holy Roman Empire as a communication(s) universe’, in R. J. W. Evans et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Oxford, 2011), pp.347–58.

26. W. Adam and S. Westphal (eds.), Handbuch der kultureller Zentren der Frühen Neuzeit. Städte und Residenzen im alten deutschen Sprachraum (3 vols., Berlin, 2012).

27. H. Schutz, The Carolingians in Central Europe, their History, Arts and Architecture (Leiden, 2004); R. McKitterick (ed.), Carolingian Culture: Emulation and Innovation (Cambridge, 1994), and her ‘The Carolingian Renaissance of culture and learning’, in J. Story (ed.), Charlemagne (Manchester, 2005), pp.151–66.

28. R. Staats, Die Reichskrone. Geschichte und Bedeutung eines europäischen Symbols (2nd ed., Kiel, 2008); G. J. Kugler, Die Reichskrone (Vienna, 1968); G. G. Wolf, Die Wiener Reichskrone (Vienna, 1995); J. Ott, Krone und Krönung. Die Verheißung und Verleihung von Kronen in der Kunst von der Spätantike bis um 1200 und die geistige Auslegung der Krone (Mainz, 1998). It has also been suggested it was made for Conrad II in 1024, or even Conrad III around a century later: M. Schulze-Dörrlamm, Die Kaiserkrone Konrads II. (1024–1039) (Sigmaringen, 1991). The political significance of coronations and the insignia generally is discussed on pp.301–2, 309–11.

29. HHStA, Staatskanzlei Vorträge, Kart.168 (9 Aug. 1804).

30. M. Schulze-Dörrlamm, Der Mainzer Schatz der Kaiserin Agnes aus dem mittleren 11. Jahrhundert (Sigmaringen, 1991); H. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft (Darmstadt, 2002), pp.30–32. For detailed discussions of all the insignia and their possible meanings, see H. Fillitz, Die Insignien und Kleinodien des Heiligen Römischen Reiches(Vienna, 1954); P. E. Schramm, Herrschaftszeichen und Staatssymbolik (3 vols., Stuttgart, 1954–6). Most of the items are displayed in the Imperial Treasury in Vienna and can be viewed in colour in M. Leithe-Jasper and R. Distelberger, The Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna: The Imperial and Ecclesiastical Treasury (London, 2003).

31. H. L. Adelson, ‘The Holy Lance and the hereditary German monarchy’, The Art Bulletin, 48 (1966), 177–92. The Lance had several associations, including with the spear used by Roman legionary Longinus to pierce Christ’s side, and with St Mauritius, patron saint of Burgundy. Recent research dismisses any association with Odin and a pagan Germanic tradition.

32. M. Schulze-Dörrlamm, Das Reichsschwert (Sigmaringen, 1995), discusses the various swords, again suggesting a much later date in line with her interpretation of the imperial crown.

33. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft, pp.131–66.

34. J. Lowden, ‘The royal/imperial book and the image or self-image of the medieval ruler’, in A. J. Duggan (ed.), Kings and Kingship in Medieval Europe (London, 1993), pp.213–39; B. Schneidmüller, ‘Zwischen Gott und den Getreuen’, FMS, 36 (2002), 193–224 at 210–19; J. Laudage et al., Die Zeit der Karolinger (Darmstadt, 2006), pp.91–106; L. Scales, ‘The illuminated Reich: Memory, crisis and the visibility of monarchy in late medieval Germany’, in J. P. Coy et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, Reconsidered (New York, 2010), pp.73–92.

35. F.-H. Hye, ‘Der Doppeladler als Symbol für Kaiser und Reich’, MIÖG, 81 (1973), 63–100; C. D. Bleisteiner, ‘Der Doppeladler von Kaiser und Reich im Mittelalter’, MIÖG, 109 (2001), 4–52; B. Pferschy-Maleczek, ‘Der Nimbus des Doppeladlers. Mystik und Allegorie im Siegelbild Kaiser Sigismunds’, ZHF, 23 (1996), 433–71.

36. E. Ricchiardi, La bandiere di Carlo Alberto (1814–1849) (Turin, 2000).

37. R. A. Müller (ed.), Bilder des Reiches (Sigmaringen, 1997); M. Tanner, The Last Descendant of Aeneas: The Hapsburgs and the Mythic Image of the Emperor (New Haven, CT, 1993).

38. B. Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider (Munich, 2008), pp.55–60.

39. E. Schubert, ‘Die Quaternionen. Entstehung, Sinngehalt und Folgen einer spätmittelalterlichen Deutung der Reichsverfassung’, ZHF, 20 (1993), 1–63; H. J. Cohn, ‘The electors and imperial rule at the end of the fifteenth century’, in B. Weiler and S. MacLean (eds.), Representations of Power in Medieval Germany, 800–1500 (Turnhout, 2006), pp.295–318 at 296, 300–303.

40. M. Goloubeva, The Glorification of Emperor Leopold I in Image, Spectacle and Text (Mainz, 2000), p.40.

41. R. J. W. Evans, Rudolf II and his World (2nd ed., London, 1997), pp.167–70. For the following see A. H. Weaver, Sacred Music as Public Image for Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand III (Farnham, 2012); P. K. Monod, The Power of Kings: Monarchy and Religion in Europe, 1589–1715 (New Haven, CT, 1999), pp.235–6; F. Matsche, Die Kunst im Dienst der Staatsidee Kaiser Karl VI. (2 vols., Berlin, 1981).

42. W. Braunfels, Die Kunst im Heiligen Römischen Reich (6 vols., Munich, 1979–89). Royal palaces are discussed on pp.332–4, while tombs are covered on pp.248, 274, 334, 367.

43. R. Hirsch, Printing, Selling and Reading, 1450–1550 (Wiesbaden, 1967); L. Silver, Marketing Maximilian: The Visual Ideology of a Holy Roman Emperor (Princeton, 2008). For the debates on political communication within the Empire see A. Gestrich, Absolutismus und Öffentlichkeit (Göttingen, 1994). For the following see J. L. Flood,Poets Laureate in the Holy Roman Empire (4 vols., Berlin, 2006).

44. S. Friedrich, Drehscheibe Regensburg. Das Informations- und Kommunikationssystem des Immerwährenden Reichstags um 1700 (Berlin, 2007); J. Feuchter and J. Helmrath (eds.), Politische Redekultur in der Vormoderne (Frankfurt am Main, 2008); K. Härter, ‘War as political and constitutional discourse: Imperial warfare and the military constitution of the Holy Roman Empire in the politics of the Permanent Diet (1663–1806)’, in A. de Benedictis and C. Magoni (eds.), Teatri di guerra (Bologna, 2010), pp.215–37.

45. P. S. Spalding, Seize the Book, Jail the Author: Johann Lorenz Schmidt and Censorship in Eighteenth-Century Germany (West Lafayette, IN, 1998); Wendehorst and Westphal (eds.), Lesebuch Altes Reich, pp.34–5.

46. P. E. Selwyn, Everyday Life in the German Book Trade (University Park, PA, 2000), pp.189–206; A. Strohmeyer, ‘Zwischen Kaiserhof und französischem Hof’, in J. Bahlcke and C. Kampmann (eds.), Wallensteinbilder im Widerstreit (Cologne, 2011), pp.51–74 at 70.

47. C. Dipper, Deutsche Geschichte, 1648–1789 (Frankfurt am Main, 1991), pp.207–10.

48. Although focusing on two smaller institutions, Matthias Asche provides a good overview of higher education throughout the Empire’s history: Von der reichen hansischen Bürgeruniversität zur armen mecklenburgischen Landeshochschule (Stuttgart, 2000). See also A. Rutz, ‘Territoriale Integration durch Bildung und Erziehung?’, in M. Grote et al. (eds.), Der Jülich-Klevische Erbstreit 1609 (Düsseldorf, 2011), pp.337–57; J. V. H. Melton, Absolutism and the Eighteenth-Century Origins of Compulsory Schooling in Prussia and Austria (Cambridge, 1988); Hartmann, Kulturgeschichte, pp.327–46.

49. J. V. H. Melton, The Rise of the Public in Enlightenment Europe (Cambridge, 2001), pp.105–8.

50. J. Weber, ‘Strassburg, 1605: The origins of the newspaper in Europe’, GH, 24 (2006), 387–412. See also W. Behringer’s publications cited in n.25 above, and A. Pettegree’s The Invention of News: How the World Came to Know About Itself (New Haven, CT, and London, 2014).

51. Melton, Rise of the Public, p.123; Selwyn, Everyday Life, p.96; Whaley, Germany, II, p.465.

52. M. Walker, Johann Jakob Moser and the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation (Chapel Hill, NC, 1981); A. Gestrich and R. Lächele (eds.), Johann Jacob Moser (Karlsruhe, 2002).

53. Enea Silvio Piccolomini, Deutschland, ed. A. Schmidt (Cologne, 1962), p.122. For the following see M. Stolleis, Geschichte des öffentlichen Rechts in Deutschland, vol. I (Munich, 1988).

54. W. Burgdorf, Reichskonstitution und Nation. Verfassungsreformprojekte für das Heilige Römische Reich deutscher Nation im politischen Schrifttum von 1648 bis 1806 (Mainz, 1998), pp.140–48.

55. B. Roeck, Reichssystem und Reichsherkommen. Die Diskussion über die Staatlichkeit des Reiches in der politischen Publizistik des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts (Stuttgart, 1984), p.28; P. Schröder, ‘The constitution of the Holy Roman Empire after 1648: Samuel Pufendorf’s assessment in his Monzambano’, HJ, 42 (1999), 961–83. For a good modern edition see H. Denzer (ed.), Die Verfassung des deutschen Reiches (Stuttgart, 1994).

56. Quoted in H. Schilling, Höfe und Allianzen. Deutschland 1648–1763 (Berlin, 1989), p.125.

57. Weissert, ‘Reichstitel’, 468–70. For the following see M. Lindemann, Patriots and Paupers: Hamburg, 1712–1830 (Oxford, 1990), esp. pp.78–83; M. Levinger, Enlightened Nationalism: The Transformation of Prussian Political Culture, 1806–1848 (Oxford, 2000).

58. E.g. by H. A. Winkler, Germany: The Long Road West (2 vols., Oxford, 2006–7), I, pp.31–2.

59. M. Wrede, Das Reich und seine Feinde (Mainz, 2004).

60. L. Lisy-Wagner, Islam, Christianity and the Making of Czech Identity, 1453–1683 (Farnham, 2013).

61. F. Ranieri, Recht und Gesellschaft im Zeitalter der Rezeption. Eine rechts- und sozialgeschichtliche Analyse der Tätigkeit des Reichskammergerichts im 16. Jahrhundert (2 vols., Cologne, 1985).

62. H. Keller, ‘Der Blick von Italien auf das “römische” Imperium und seine “deutschen” Kaiser’, in Schneidmüller and Weinfurter (eds.), Heilig – Römisch – Deutsch, pp.286–307.

63. S. K. Cohn Jr, Lust for Liberty: The Politics of Social Revolt in Medieval Europe, 1200–1425 (Cambridge, MA, 2006), p.218. See also N. Rubenstein, ‘The place of the Empire in fifteenth-century Florentine political opinion and diplomacy’, Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research, 30 (1957), 125–35; M. Schnettger, ‘Impero Romano – Impero Germanico. Italienische Perspektiven auf das Reich in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in idem (ed.), Imperium Romanum – irregulare corpus – Teutsche Reichs-Staat (Mainz, 2002), pp.53–75.

64. Recently, this interpretation has been given new life by those arguing that the Empire’s political culture was essentially aristocratic and that its existence was purely ‘virtual’, devoid of any real meaning for daily existence. The social dimension of this discussion is explored in Part IV.

65. G. Schnath, Geschichte Hannovers im Zeitalter der neunten Kur und der englischen Sukzession, 1674–1714 (5 vols., Hildesheim, 1938–82), I, p.166.

66. Quoted in W. Jannen Jr, ‘“Das liebe Teutschland” in the seventeenth century – Count George Frederick von Waldeck’, European Studies Review, 6 (1976), 165–95 at 178; Kugler, Reichskrone, pp.113–19.

67. P. H. Wilson, ‘The nobility of the early modern Reich, 1495–1806’, in H. M. Scott (ed.), The European Nobilities in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (2nd ed., 2 vols., Basingstoke, 2007), II, pp.73–117; H. Carl, ‘Europäische Adelsgesellschaft und deutsche Nation in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in Schmidt (ed.), Die deutsche Nation, pp.181–99; B. Giesen, Intellectuals and the Nation: Collective Identity in a German Axial Age (Cambridge, 1998).

68. P. Moraw, ‘Kanzlei und Kanzleipersonal König Ruprechts’, Archiv für Diplomatik, 15 (1969), 428–531; G. Schmidt-von Rhein, ‘Das Reichskammergericht in Wetzlar’, NA, 100 (1989), 127–40 at 127–30; A. Baumann et al. (eds.), Reichspersonal. Funktionsträger für Kaiser und Reich (Cologne, 2003).

69. B. Koch, Räte auf deutschen Reichsversammlungen. Zur Entwicklung der politischen Funktionselite im 15. Jahrhundert (Frankfurt am Main, 1999); B. Wunder, ‘Die Sozialstruktur der Geheimratskollegien in den süddeutschen protestantischen Fürstentümern (1660–1720)’, VSWG, 58 (1971), 145–220.

70. HHStA, Prinzipalkommissar Berichte Fasz.182d, letter of 11 Aug. 1806.

71. W. Burgdorf, Ein Weltbild verliert seine Welt. Der Untergang des Alten Reiches und die Generation 1806 (2nd ed., Munich, 2009), pp.211–17; S. Ehrenpreis et al., ‘Probing the legal history of the Jews in the Holy Roman Empire’, Jahrbuch des Simon-Dubnow-Instituts, 2 (2003), 409–87 at 443, 451–4; D. P. Bell, Jewish Identity in Early Modern Germany (Aldershot, 2007), p.80.

72. G. J. Schenk, Zeremoniell und Politik. Herrschereinzüge im spätmittelalterlichen Reich (Cologne, 2003); M. A. Bojcov, ‘How one archbishop of Trier perambulated his lands’, in Weiler and MacLean (eds.), Representations of Power, pp.319–48; H. J. Cohn, ‘Representing political space at a political site: The imperial diets of the sixteenth century’, in B. Kümin (ed.), Political Space in Pre-industrial Europe (Farnham, 2009), pp.19–42; L. E. Saurma-Jeltsch, ‘Das mittelalterliche Reich in der Reichsstadt’, in Schneidmüller and Weinfurter (eds.), Heilig – Römisch – Deutsch, pp. 399–439. For the 1742 election see P. C. Hartmann, Karl Albrecht – Karl VII. (Regensburg, 1985), pp.218–43.

73. E.g. fifteenth-century Frankfurt: H. Boockmann, ‘Geschäfte und Geschäftigkeit auf dem Reichstag im späten Mittelalter’, HZ, 246 (1988), 297–325.

74. M. Merian, Topographia Germaniae (14 vols., Frankfurt am Main, 1643–75), volume covering Swabia, plate between pages 10 and 11. The city was to be disappointed: no Reichstag had been held there since 1582 except for briefly in 1713 when it temporarily relocated from Regensburg to avoid the plague.

75. H. J. Berbig, ‘Der Krönungsritus im Alten Reich (1648–1806)’, ZBLG, 38 (1975), 639–700.

76. H. Keller, Die Ottonen (4th ed., Munich, 2008), p.56; W. Hartmann, Der Investiturstreit (3rd ed., Munich, 2007), p.34; B. Schneidmüller, Die Kaiser des Mittelalters (2nd ed., Munich, 2007), p.107.

77. C. Hattenhauer, Wahl und Krönung Franz II. AD 1792 (Frankfurt am Main, 1995), p.137; Gestrich, Absolutismus und Öffentlichkeit, pp.151–2.

78. P. Münz, Frederick Barbarossa (London, 1969), p.10. Further discussion of the peasants’ political identification with the emperor on p.592.

79. W. Troßbach, ‘Die Reichsgerichte in der Sicht bäuerlicher Untertanen’, in B. Diestelkamp (ed.), Das Reichskammergericht in der deutschen Geschichte (Cologne, 1990), pp.129–42; D. M. Luebke, His Majesty’s Rebels: Communities, Factions and Rural Revolt in the Black Forest, 1725–1745 (Ithaca, NY, 1997).

80. Wendehorst and Westphal (eds.), Lesebuch, pp.48–51, 95–6.

81. T. Biskup, Friedrichs Größe: Inszenierungen des Preußenkönigs in Fest und Zeremoniell, 1740–1815 (Frankfurt, 2012); S. Mazura, Die preußische und österreichische Kriegspropaganda im Ersten und Zweiten Schlesischen Krieg (Berlin, 1996); G. Schmidt, Geschichte des Alten Reiches (Munich, 1999), pp.271–89, 352; Blanning, The Culture of Power, pp.212–32.

82. J. W. von Archenholz, Geschichte des Siebenjährigen Krieges in Deutschland in Deutschland (Berlin, 1828), pp.76–80.

83. A. Green, ‘Political institutions and nationhood in Germany’, in L. Scales and O. Zimmer (eds.), Power and the Nation in European History (Cambridge, 2005), pp.315–32 at 317–18; Whaley, Germany, II, pp.410–12; Wendehorst and Westphal (eds.), Lesebuch, pp.16–18.

84. See Goethe’s reminiscences: Collected Works, Vol. 12, ed. T. P. Saine and J. L. Sammons (Princeton, 1987), IV, From my Life: Poetry and Truth, pp.139–61. Further discussion in D. Beales, Joseph II (2 vols., Cambridge, 1987–2009), I, pp.111–15; Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider, pp.227–81.

85. Winkler, Germany, I, p.49. See also C. Wiedemann, ‘Zwischen National-geist und Kosmopolitismus. Über die Schwierigkeiten der deutschen Klassiker, einen Nationalhelden zu finden’, Aufklärung, 4 (1989), 75–101, and generally E. Kedourie, Nationalism (3rd ed., London, 1966).

86. D. Fulda, ‘Zwischen Gelehrten- und Kulturnationalismus. Die “deutsche Nation” in der literaturpolitischen Publizistik Johann Christoph Gottscheds’, in Schmidt (ed.), Die deutsche Nation, pp.267–91.

87. I. F. McNeely, The Emancipation of Writing: German Civil Society in the Making, 1790s–1820s (Berkeley, CA, 2003), pp.242–3.

CHAPTER 7: KINGSHIP

1. H. Neuhaus, Das Reich in der Frühen Neuzeit (Munich, 1997), pp.17–19, with more detail in NTSR, II.

2. H. Wolfram, Conrad II, 990–1039 (University Park, PA, 2006), pp.150–53; H. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft (Darmstadt, 2002), pp.30–32;.K. Leyser, Medieval Germany and its Neighbours, 900–1250 (London, 1982), pp.241–67; K. Repgen (ed.), Das Herrscherbild im 17. Jahrhundert (Münster, 1991). Royal piety is discussed on pp.30–32.

3. See e.g. Wipo of Burgundy’s comments on Conrad II: T. E. Mommsen and K. F. Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters of the Eleventh Century (New York, 2000), pp.65–6. For the following: B. Weiler, ‘The rex renitens and the medieval idea of kingship, ca. 900–ca. 1250’, Viator, 31 (2000), 1–42.

4. Thietmar of Merseburg, Ottonian Germany: The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg, ed. D. A. Warner (Manchester, 2001), pp.18–21. Also Regino of Prüm in S. MacLean (ed.), History and Politics in Late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe (Manchester, 2009), pp.45–6.

5. Useful discussion in K. Görich, Friedrich Barbarossa (Munich, 2011), pp.601–48.

6. H.-D. Kahl, ‘Zum Ursprung von germ. König’, ZSRG GA, 77 (1960), 198–240.

7. E. Hlawitschka, ‘Zur Herkunft und zu den Seitenverwandten des Gegen-königs Rudolf von Rheinfelden’, and M. Twellenkamp, ‘Das Haus der Luxemburger’, both in S. Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich (3 vols., Sigmaringen, 1991), I, pp.175–220, 475–502 at 492–6. See also D. Mertens, ‘Von Rhein zur Rems’ in ibid, I, pp.221–52, for Staufer claims of descent from the Salians.

8. C. Hirschi, The Origins of Nationalism (Cambridge, 2012), pp.180–95; H. J. Cohn, ‘Did bribes induce the German electors to choose Charles V as emperor in 1519?’, GH, 19 (2001), 1–27; A. Schmidt, ‘Ein französischer Kaiser? Die Diskussion um die Nationalität des Reichsoberhauptes im 17. Jahrhundert’, HJb, 123 (2003), 149–77.

9. H. Stoob, ‘Zur Königswahl Lothars von Sachsen im Jahre 1125’, in H. Beu-mann (ed.), Historische Forschungen für Walter Schlesinger (Cologne, 1974), pp.438–61. For Lothar III’s election, see also pp.357–8. For the importance of judging medieval kings according to their contemporaries’ expectations, see G. Althoff, Otto III(Philadelphia, 2003), pp.132–46.

10. T. Reuter, ‘The medieval German Sonderweg ? The Empire and its rulers in the high Middle Ages’, in A. J. Duggan (ed.), Kings and Kingship in Medieval Europe (London, 1993), pp.179–211 at 197.

11. G. Althoff, Die Ottonen (2nd ed., Stuttgart, 2005), pp.61–4.

12. K. Görich, Die Staufer (2nd ed., Munich, 2008), p.35.

13. Wolfram, Conrad II, p.25; G. Lubich, ‘Beobachtungen zur Wahl Konrads III. und ihrem Umfeld’, HJb, 117 (1997), 311–39 at 312; E. J. Goldberg, Struggle for Empire: Kingship and Conflict under Louis the German, 817–876 (Ithaca, NY, 2006), pp.189–91.

14. H. Fuhrmann, Germany in the High Middle Ages, c.1050–1200 (Cambridge, 1986), p.39.

15. J. K. Hoensch, Die Luxemburger. Eine spätmittelalterliche Dynastie gesamteuropäischer Bedeutung, 1308–1437 (Stuttgart, 2000), p.108.

16. Thietmar of Merseburg, Chronicon, pp.187–90; Althoff, Die Ottonen, pp.202–7. See generally J. Petersohn, ‘Über monarchische Insignien und ihre Funktion im mittelalterlichen Reich’, HZ, 266 (1998), 47–96.

17. P. Moraw, ‘Ruprecht von der Pfalz. Ein König aus Heidelberg’, ZGO, 149 (2001), 97–110 at 98.

18. Typical of the older view is the belief that the emperor was reduced to a ‘figurehead’: G. H. Perris, Germany and the German Emperor (London, 1912), pp.34–5.

19. J. Gillingham, ‘Elective kingship and the unity of medieval Germany’, GH, 9 (1991), 124–35 at 128–9.

20. Ibid, 132.

21. The emphasis on ‘blood right’ is strongest in literature appearing in the Nazi era: H. Mitteis, Die deutsche Königswahl. Ihre Rechtsgrundlagen bis zur Goldenen Bulle (Darmstadt, 1975; 1st pub. 1938). Fuller discussion of these points in E. Hlawitschka, Untersuchungen zu den Thronwechseln der ersten Hälfte des 11. Jahrhunderts und zur Adelsgeschichte Süddeutschlands (Sigmaringen, 1987); R. Schneider, Königswahl und Königserhebung im Frühmittelalter (Stuttgart, 1972).

22. E. Perels, Der Erbreichsplan Heinrichs VI. (Berlin, 1927); U. Schmidt, Königswahl und Thronfolge im 12. Jahrhundert (Cologne, 1987), pp.225–60.

23. Schmidt, Königswahl, pp.145–66.

24. U. Reuling, Die Kur in Deutschland und Frankreich. Untersuchungen zur Entwicklung des rechtsförmlichen Wahlaktes bei der Königserhebung im 11. und 12. Jahrhundert (Göttingen, 1979), p.205; S. Patzold, ‘Königserhebungen zwischen Erbrecht und Wahlrecht? Thronfolge und Rechtsmentalität um das Jahr 1000’, DA, 58 (2002), 467–507.

25. A. Begert, Die Entstehung und Entwicklung des Kurkollegs. Von den Anfängen bis zum frühen 15. Jahrhundert (Berlin, 2010), pp.171–90.

26. Schmidt, Königswahl, p.33. For Rudolf see T. Struve, Salierzeit im Wandel (Cologne, 2006), pp.84–95. For his election see I. S. Robinson, Henry IV of Germany, 1056–1106 (Cambridge, 1999), pp.167–70; H. E. J. Cowdrey, Pope Gregory VII, 1073–1085 (Oxford, 1998), pp.167–71; Reuling, Die Kur, pp.104–16.

27. Schmidt, Königswahl, p.262. See also ibid, pp.34–59, 69–91; B. Schneidmüller, ‘1125 – Unruhe als politische Kraft im mittelalterlichen Reich’, in W. Hechberger and F. Schuller (eds.), Staufer & Welfen (Regensburg, 2009), pp.31–49; S. Dick, ‘Die Königserhebung Friedrich Barbarossas im Spiegel der Quellen’, ZSRG GA, 121 (2004), 200–237.

28. The older interpretation is voiced by Mitteis, Die deutsche Königswahl, pp.95–8.

29. U. Reinhardt, Untersuchungen zur Stellung der Geistlichkeit bei den Königswahlen im Fränkischen und Deutschen Reich (751–1250) (Marburg, 1975), esp. pp.83–9; D. Waßenhoven, ‘Bischöfe als Königsmacher? Selbstverständnis und Anspruch des Episkopats bei Herrscherwechseln im 10. und frühen 11. Jahrhundert’, in L. Körntgen and D. Waßerhoven (eds.), Religion and Politics in the Middle Ages: Germany and England by Comparison (Berlin, 2013), pp.31–50; R. Reisinger, Die römisch-deutschen Könige und ihre Wähler, 1198–1273 (Aalen, 1977), p.110.

30. H. C. Faußner, ‘Die Thronerhebung des deutschen Königs im Hochmittelalter und die Entstehung des Kurfürstenkollegiums’, ZSRG GA, 108 (1991), 1–60 at 34–8.

31. E. Boshof, ‘Erstkurrecht und Erzämtertheorie im Sachsenspiegel’, in T. Schieder (ed.), Beiträge zur Geschichte des mittelalterlichen deutschen Königtums (Munich, 1973), pp.84–121.

32. H. Stehkämper, ‘Der Kölner Erzbischof Adolf von Altena und die deutsche Königswahl (1195–1205)’, in Schieder (ed.), Beiträge, pp.5–83. See also Reinhardt, Untersuchungen zur Stellung der Geistlichkeit, pp.269–73.

33. Begert, Die Entstehung und Entwicklung des Kurkollegs, pp.149–70. The arch-offices are discussed on pp.319–20.

34. A. Wolf, Die Entstehung des Kurfürstenkollegs, 1198–1298 (Idstein, 1998); W.-D. Mohrmann, Lauenburg oder Wittenberg? Zum Problem des sächsischen Kurstreites bis zur Mitte des 14. Jahrhunderts (Hildesheim, 1975); U. Hohensee et al. (eds.), Die Goldene Bulle. Politik – Wahrnehmung – Rezeption (2 vols., Berlin, 2009). For Charles IV’s motives, see pp.389–92.

35. A. Gotthard, Säulen des Reiches. Die Kurfürsten im frühneuzeitlichen Reichsverband (Husum, 1999), pp.609–11; T. Brockmann, Dynastie, Kaiseramt und Konfession (Paderborn, 2011), pp.320–25. The figures look a little better from the Habsburgs’ perspective when we remember that two imperial elections were triggered by the unexpectedly early deaths of incumbent emperors (1711, 1792), while another election was held following the equally unanticipated premature death of a king of the Romans (1658).

36. Goldberg, Struggle for Empire, pp.220–21.

37. S. Haider, Die Wahlversprechungen der römisch-deutschen Könige bis zum Ende des zwölften Jahrhunderts (Vienna, 1968); G. Kleinheyer, Die kaiserlichen Wahlkapitulationen (Karlsruhe, 1968), pp.21–2.

38. The 1711 agreement is printed in K. Zeumer (ed.), Quellensammlung zur Geschichte der deutschen Reichsverfassung in Mittelalter und Neuzeit (Tübingen, 1913), pp.474–97. See also H.-M. Empell, ‘De eligendo regis vivente imperatore. Die Regelung in der Beständigen Wahlkapitulation und ihre Interpretation in der Staatsrechtsliteratur des 18. Jahrhunderts’, ZNRG, 16 (1994), 11–24.

39. E. Boshof, Königtum und Königsherrschaft im 10. und 11. Jahrhundert (3rd ed., Munich, 2010), pp.51–77; W. Goldinger, ‘Das Zeremoniell der deutschen Königskrönung seit dem späten Mittelalter’, Mitteilungen des Oberösterreichischen Landesarchivs, 5 (1957), 91–111; H. J. Berbig, ‘Der Krönungsritus im Alten Reich (1648–1806)’,ZBLG, 38 (1975), 639–700. For the following see also R. Elze (ed.), Ordines coronationis imperialis (MGH, vol.19, Hanover, 1960).

40. R. A. Jackson (ed.), Ordines coronationis franciae: Texts and Ordines for the Coronation of Frankish and French Kings and Queens in the Middle Ages (2 vols., Philadelphia, 1995–2000), I, pp.1–23. Charlemagne’s coronation is discussed on pp.26–9.

41. Thietmar of Merseburg, Chronicon, pp.72–3. See also Reinhardt, Untersuchungen zur Stellung der Geistlichkeit, pp.83–4, 90–132; Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft, pp.91–130.

42. E. Boshof, ‘Köln, Mainz, Trier. Die Auseinandersetzung um die Spitzen-stellung im deutschen Episkopat in ottonisch-salischer Zeit’, Jahrbuch des Kölnischen Geschichtsvereins, 49 (1978), 19–48.

43. See contemporary descriptions: C. Hattenhauer, Wahl und Krönung Franz II. AD 1792 (Frankfurt am Main, 1995), pp.203–360; NTSR, II, 311–59.

44. R. Schieffer, ‘Otto II. und sein Vater’, FMS, 36 (2002), 255–69.

45. B. Weiler, ‘Reasserting power: Frederick II in Germany (1235–1236)’, in idem and S. MacLean (eds.), Representations of Power in Medieval Germany, 800–1500 (Turnhout, 2006), pp.241–71. Henry is numbered (VII), because his status was either unknown or not recognized at Henry VII’s accession in 1308.

46. A. Wolf, ‘Reigning queens in medieval Europe: When, where, and why’, in J. C. Parsons (ed.), Medieval Queenship (Stroud, 1994), pp.169–88.

47. A. Fößel, Die Königin im mittelalterlichen Reich (Sigmaringen, 2000), pp.17–49; B. Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider (Munich, 2008), pp.190–93; NTSR, II, 642–57. For the position of Carolingian women see J. L. Nelson, ‘Women at the court of Charlemagne: A case of monstrous regiment?’, in Parsons (ed.), Medieval Queenship, pp.43–61; P. Stafford, Queens, Concubines and Dowagers: The King’s Wife in the Early Middle Ages (London, 1983).

48. E. J. Goldberg, ‘Regina nitens sanctissima Hemma: Queen Emma (827–876), Bishop Witgar of Augsburg and the Witgar-Belt’, in Weiler and MacLean (eds.), Representations of Power, pp.57–95; S. MacLean, ‘Queenship, nunneries and royal widowhood in Carolingian Europe’, P&P, 178 (2003), 3–38.

49. T. Vogelsang, Die Frau als Herrscherin im hohen Mittelalter. Studien zur ‘consors regni’-Formel (Göttingen, 1954); G. Baumer, Otto I. und Adelheid (Tübingen, 1951).

50. P. Hamer, Kunigunde von Luxemburg. Die Rettung des Reiches (Luxembourg, 1985); S. Pflefka, ‘Kunigunde und Heinrich II. Politische Wirkungsmöglichkeit einer Kaiserin an der Schwelle eines neuen Jahr-tausends’, Historischer Verein Bamberg, 135 (1999), 199–290.

51. C. E. Odegaard, ‘The Empress Engelberge’, Speculum, 26 (1951), 77–103 at 95; Althoff, Die Ottonen, pp.76, 138–9.

52. T. Offergeld, Reges pueri. Das Königtum Minderjähriger im frühen Mittelalter (Hanover, 2001).

53. Thietmar of Merseburg, Chronicon, p.103. See generally E. Eickhoff, Theophanu und der König (Stuttgart, 1996); A. Davids (ed.), The Empress Theophano: Byzantium and the West at the Time of the First Millennium (Cambridge, 1995). L. Wangerin, ‘Empress Theophanu, sanctity, and memory in early medieval Saxony’, CEH, 47 (2014), 716–36. For Heinrich the Quarrelsome see also pp.343–6.

54. J. W. Bernhardt, ‘Concepts and practice of empire in Ottonian Germany (950–1024)’, in Weiler and MacLean (eds.), Representations of Power, pp.141–63 at 150–51; Fößel, Die Königin, pp.51–4. For the following see also Althoff, Otto III, pp.40–51.

55. Cited by S. Weinfurter, The Salian Century (Philadelphia, 1999), p.114. See generally M. Black-Veldtrup, Kaiserin Agnes (1043–1077) (Cologne, 1995); G. Jenal, Erzbischof Anno II. von Köln (1056–75) und sein politisches Wirken (2 vols., Stuttgart, 1974–5), I, pp.155–95; G. Althoff, Heinrich IV. (Darmstadt, 2006), pp.41–66.

56. M. S. Sánchez, The Empress, the Queen and the Nun: Women and Power at the Court of Philip III of Spain (Baltimore, 1998); C. W. Ingrao and A. L. Thomas, ‘Piety and power: The empresses-consort of the high baroque’, in C. C. Orr (ed.), Queenship in Europe, 1660–1815 (Cambridge, 2004), pp.107–30.

57. P. H. Wilson, ‘Women in imperial politics: The Württemberg consorts, 1674–1757’, in Orr (ed.), Queenship, pp.221–51; P. Puppel, Die Regentin. Vormundschaftliche Herrschaft in Hessen, 1500–1700 (Frankfurt am Main, 2004); H. Wunder, He is the Sun, she is the Moon: Women in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, MA, 1998), pp.165–74.

58. B. Weiler, ‘Image and reality in Richard of Cornwall’s German career’, EHR, 113 (1998), 1111–42 at 1125–6.

59. W. Hermkes, Das Reichsvikariat in Deutschland (Bonn, 1968).

60. F. Baethgen, ‘Der Anspruch des Papsttums auf das Reichsvikariat’, ZSRG KA, 10 (1920), 168–268; R. Pauler, Die deutschen Könige und Italien im 14. Jahrhudert von Heinrich VII. bis Karl IV. (Darmstadt, 1997), pp.13–14, 23–4.

61. R. Pauler, Die Auseinandersetzungen zwischen Kaiser Karl IV. und den Päpsten (Neuried, 1996), p.211. For the following: C. Zwierlein, ‘Savoyen-Piemonts Verhältnis zum Reich 1536 bis 1618’, in M. Schnettger and M. Verga (eds.), L’Impero e l’Italia nella prima età moderna (Bologna, 2006), pp.347–89 at 367–84.

62. G. Droege, ‘Pfalzgrafschaft, Grafschaften und allodiale Herrschaften zwischen Maas und Rhein in salisch-staufischer Zeit’, RVJB, 26 (1961), 1–21; Jenal, Erzbischof Anno, I, pp.110–54. For the following: J. Peltzer, Der Rang der Pfalzgrafen bei Rhein. Die Gestaltung der politisch-sozialen Ordnung des Reichs im 13. und 14. Jahrhundert(Ostfildern, 2013).

63. Fuhrmann, Germany, p.32. See also J. Laudage, ‘Der Hof Friedrich Barbarossas’, in idem and Y. Leiverkus (eds.), Rittertum und Höfische Kultur der Stauferzeit (Cologne, 2006), pp.75–92; Goldberg, Struggle for Empire, pp.191–8. For the Carolingian court see R. McKitterick, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians (Harlow, 1983), pp.78–80; J. Laudage et al., Die Zeit der Karolinger (Darmstadt, 2006), pp.146–62. Royal assemblies are discussed on pp.337–8.

64. McKitterick, The Frankish Kingdoms, pp.80–85.

65. P. C. Hartmann (ed.), Der Mainzer Kurfürst als Reichserzkanzler (Stuttgart, 1997); H. Duchhardt, ‘Kurmainz und das Reichskammergericht’, BDLG, 110 (1974), 181–217.

66. W. Metz, Zur Erforschung des karolingischen Reichsgutes (Darmstadt, 1971).

67. B. S. Bachrach, Early Carolingian Warfare (Philadelphia, 2001), pp.57–9; R. McKitterick, Charlemagne (Cambridge, 2008), Chapter 4; A. Barbero, Karl der Grosse (Stuttgart, 2007).

68. G. Brown, ‘The Carolingian Renaissance’, in R. McKitterick (ed.), Carolingian Culture (Cambridge, 1994), pp.1–51 at 34. See also R. McKitterick, The Carolingians and the Written Word (Cambridge, 1989); A. Wenderhorst, ‘Who could read and write in the Middle Ages?’, in A. Haverkamp and H. Vollrath (eds.), England and Germany in the High Middle Ages (Oxford, 1996), pp.57–88.

69. H. Keller, ‘Vom “heiligen Buch” zur “Buchführung”. Lebensfunktionen der Schrift im Mittelalter’, FMS, 26 (1992), 1–31.

70. M. Costambeys et al., The Carolingian World (Cambridge, 2011), pp. 182–9; D. S. Bachrach, ‘The written word in Carolingian-style fiscal administration under King Henry I, 919–936’, GH, 28 (2010), 399–423.

71. W. Treadgold, A Concise History of Byzantium (Basingstoke, 2001), esp. p.236.

72. Quote from R. Collins, ‘Making sense of the early Middle Ages’, EHR, 124 (2009), 641–65 at 650.

73. Ottonian emperors rarely fielded more than 2,000 armoured cavalry and 4,000–6,000 infantry and baggage personnel while in Italy: L. Auer, ‘Der Kriegsdienst des Klerus unter den sächsischen Kaiser’, MIÖG, 79 (1971), 316–407, and 80 (1972), 48–70.

74. J. France, ‘The composition and raising of the armies of Charlemagne’, Journal of Medieval Military History, 1 (2002), 61–82; T. Reuter, ‘Carolingian and Ottonian warfare’, in M. Keen (ed.), Medieval Warfare (Oxford, 1999), pp.13–35 at 28–9; Goldberg, Struggle for Empire, pp. 124–6; Althoff, Die Ottonen, pp.106, 148; G. Halsall,Warfare and Society in the Barbarian West, 450–900 (London, 2003), pp.119–33; Leyser, Medieval Germany, pp.11–42; G. A. Loud (ed.), The Crusade of Frederick Barbarossa (Farnham, 2013), p.19. Far larger estimates for Ottonian forces appear in D. S. Bachrach, Warfare in Tenth-Century Germany (Woodbridge, 2012), pp.12, 177–8, 232–6.

75. Very few seventeenth- or early eighteenth-century Habsburg officers received formal training or read military books, yet they were accustomed by status and running landed estates to the tasks of man-management, animal care, and numerous other practical skills: E. A. Lund, War for the Every Day: Generals, Knowledge and Warfare in Early Modern Europe, 1680–1740 (Westport, CT, 1999).

76. H. Schwarzmaier, ‘Das “Salische Hausarchiv”’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, I, pp.97–115. See also H. Keller, ‘Ritual, Symbolik und Visualisierung in der Kultur des ottonischen Reiches’, FMS, 35 (2001), 23–59 esp. 55–9; Leyser, Medieval Germany, pp.69–101.

77. A. T. Hack, Das Empfangszeremoniell bei mittelalterlichen Papst-Kaiser-Treffen (Cologne, 1999), pp.586–7; H. J. Cohn, ‘The political culture of the Imperial Diet as reflected in Reformation-era diaries’, in D. Repeto García (ed.), Las Cortes de Cádiz y la historia parlamentaria (Cadiz, 2012), pp.603–72, and his ‘The protocols of the German imperial diet during the reign of Emperor Charles V’, in J. Feuchter and J. Helmrath (eds.), Politische Redekultur in der Vormoderne (Frankfurt am Main, 2008), pp.45–63.

78. G. Koch, Auf dem Wege zum Sacrum Imperium (Vienna, 1972), p.30; P. Moraw, ‘Kanzlei und Kanzleipersonal König Ruprechts’, Archiv für Diplomatik, 15 (1969), 428–531 at 438–9; W. Blockmans, Emperor Charles V, 1500–1558 (London, 2002), p.133.

79. R. Schneider, ‘Landeserschließung und Raumerfassung durch salische Herrscher’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, I, pp.117–38 at 130–34; Moraw, ‘Kanzlei’.

80. J. M. Headley, The Emperor and his Chancellor: A Study of the Imperial Chancellery under Gattinara (Cambridge, 1983); E. Ortlieb, ‘Die Entstehung des Reichshofrats in der Regierungszeit der Kaiser Karl V. und Ferdinand I.’, Frühneuzeit-Info, 17 (2006), 11–26.

81. B. Blisch, Friedrich Carl Joseph von Erthal (1774–1802). Erzbischof – Kurfürst – Erzkanzler (Frankfurt am Main, 2005), pp.32–3.

82. See the two collections edited by R. Bonney: Economic Systems and State Finance (Oxford, 1995); The Rise of the Fiscal State in Europe c.1200–1815 (Oxford, 1999).

83. Goldberg, Struggle for Empire, pp.203–6.

84. Boshof, Königtum und Königsherrschaft, p.82.

85. E. A. R. Brown, ‘The tyranny of a construct: Feudalism and the historians of medieval Europe’, AHR, 79 (1974), 1063–88; S. Reynolds, Fiefs and Vassals: The Medieval Evidence Reinterpreted (Oxford, 1994), and her response to J. Fried, both in GHIL, 19 (1997), no.1, pp.28–41, no.2, pp. 30–34. Good overviews for the specific situation in the Empire: K.-H. Spiess, Das Lehnswesen in Deutschland im hohen und späten Mittelalter (2nd ed., Stuttgart, 2009); S. Patzold, Das Lehnswesen (Munich, 2012).

86. T. Mayer, ‘Die Entstehung des “modernen” Staates im Mittelalter und die freien Bauern’, ZSRG GA, 57 (1937), 210–88, and his ‘Die Ausbildung der Grundlagen des modernen deutschen Staates im hohen Mittelalter’, HZ, 159 (1939), 457–87. For critique: H.-W. Goetz, ‘Regnum. Zum politischen Denken der Karolingerzeit’, ZSRG GA, 104 (1987), 110–89; E. Schubert, Fürstliche Herrschaft und Territorium im späten Mittelalter (2nd ed., Munich, 2006), pp.222, 57–61.

87. Notably Marxist interpretations: R. H. Hilton, Class Conflict and the Crisis of Feudalism (London, 1985).

88. T. Zotz, ‘In Amt und Würden. Zur Eigenart “offizieller” Positionen im früheren Mittelalter’, Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, 22 (1993), 1–23.

89. L. Auer, ‘Der Kriegsdienst des Klerus unter den sächsischen Kaisern’, MIÖG, 79 (1971), 316–407, and 80 (1972), 48–70; T. Reuter, ‘Episcopi cum sua militia  : The prelate as warrior in the early Staufer era’, in idem (ed.), Warriors and Churchmen in the High Middle Ages (London, 1992), pp. 79–94; B. Arnold, ‘German bishops and their military retinues in the medieval Empire’, GH, 7 (1989), 161–83; K. L. Krieger, ‘Obligatory military service and the use of mercenaries in imperial military campaigns under the Hohenstaufen emperors’, in Haverkamp and Vollrath (eds.), England and Germany, pp.151–68.

90. C. E. Odegaard, ‘Carolingian oaths of fidelity’, Speculum, 16 (1941), 284–96, and his ‘The concept of royal power in Carolingian oaths of fidelity’, Speculum, 20 (1945), 279–89; H. Keller, ‘Die Investitur. Ein Beitrag zum Problem der “Staatssymbolik” im Hochmittelalter’, FMS, 27 (1993), 51–86.

91. H. K. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), I, pp.56–9, 73–4.

92. C. Brühl, Fodrum, Gistum, Servitium regis. Studien zu den wirtschaftlichen Grundlagen des Königtums im Frankenreich und in den fränkischen Nachfolgestaaten Deutschland, Frankreich und Italien vom 6. bis zur Mitte des 14. Jahrhunderts (2 vols., Cologne, 1968); W. Metz, Das Servitium regis. Zur Erforschung der wirtschaftlichen Grundlagen des hochmittelalterlichen deutschen Königtums (Darmstadt, 1978).

93. K. Leyser, ‘Ottonian government’, EHR, 96 (1981), 721–53 at 746–7; E. Müller-Mertens, ‘Reich und Hauptorte der Salier’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, I, pp.139–58.

94. Costambeys et al., The Carolingian World, pp.122, 172–8.

95. T. Zotz, ‘Carolingian tradition and Ottonian-Salian innovation: Comparative observations on palatine policy in the Empire’, in Duggan (ed.), Kings and Kingship, pp.69–100; J. Dahlhaus, ‘Zu den Anfängen von Pfalz und Stiften in Goslar’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, II, pp.373–428.

96. Schulze, Grundstrukturen, II, pp.112–15.

97. J. W. Bernhardt, Itinerant Kingship and Royal Monasteries in Early Medieval Germany, c.936–1075 (Cambridge, 1993), pp.75–135.

98. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft, p.109; H. Jericke, ‘Konradins Marsch von Rom zur palentinische Ebene im August 1268 und die Größe und Struktur seines Heeres’, Römische Historische Mitteilungen, 44 (2002), 151–92.

99. D. J. Hay, The Military Leadership of Matilda of Canossa, 1046–1115 (Manchester, 2008), p.184.

100. S. Weinfurter, ‘Salisches Herrschaftsverständnis im Wandel. Heinrich V. und sein Privileg für die Bürger von Speyer’, FMS, 36 (2002), 317–35.

101. M. Innes, ‘Charlemagne’s government’, in J. Story (ed.), Charlemagne (Manchester, 2005), pp.71–89.

102. G. Althoff, ‘Die Billunger in der Salierzeit’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, I, pp.309–29; Wolfram, Conrad II, pp.177–90.

103. McKitterick, The Frankish Kingdoms, pp.87–97; Costambeys et al., The Carolingian World, pp.172–9.

104. J. L. Nelson, ‘Kingship and empire in the Carolingian world’, in McKitterick (ed.), Carolingian Culture, pp.52–87 esp. 52; Goldberg, Struggle for Empire, pp.226–9.

105. S. Patzold, ‘Konsens und Konkurrenz. Überlegungen zu einem aktuellen Forschungskonzept der Mediävistik’, FMS, 41 (2007), 75–103.

106. G. Althoff, Verwandte, Freunde und Getreue. Zum politischen Stellenwert der Gruppenbindungen im früheren Mittelalter (Darmstadt, 1990), pp.119–33, and his ‘Friendship and political order’, in J. Haseldine (ed.), Friendship in Medieval Europe (Stroud, 1999), pp.91–105; C. Garnier, Die Kultur der Bitte. Herrschaft und Kommunikation im mittelalterlichen Reich (Darmstadt, 2008).

107. B. Schneidmüller, ‘Zwischen Gott und den Getreuen’, FMS, 36 (2002), 193–224 at 212.

108. Costambeys et al., The Carolingian World, pp.213–22, 379–83; McKitterick, The Frankish Kingdoms, pp.169–73. For the high level of violence and its impact see G. Halsall (ed.), Violence and Society in the Early Medieval West (Woodbridge, 1998).

109. R. Collins, Early Medieval Europe, 300–1000 (Basingstoke, 1991), p.309. See J. Nelson, Charles the Bald (London, 1992); S. MacLean, Kingship and Politics in the Late Ninth Century: Charles the Fat and the End of the Carolingian Empire (Cambridge, 2003).

110. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft, pp.12–21.

111. A. Haverkamp, ‘Die Städte im Herrschafts- und Sozialgefüge Reichsitaliens’, in F. Vittinghoff (ed.), Stadt und Herrschaft. Römische Kaiserzeit und hohes Mittelalter (Munich, 1982), pp.149–245 at 166–9.

112. Goldberg, Struggle for Empire, pp.335–42; Althoff, Die Ottonen, p.15. See also R. Hiestand, ‘Pressburg 907. Eine Wende in der Geschichte des ostfränkischen Reiches?’, ZBLG, 57 (1994), 1–20.

113. J. Fried, ‘Die Kunst der Aktualisierung in der oralen Gesellschaft. Die Königserhebung Heinrichs I. als Exempel’, GWU, 44 (1993), 493–503; R. Deutinger, ‘“Königswahl” und Herzogserhebung Arnulfs von Bayern’, DA, 58 (2002), 17–68; M. Becher, Otto der Große (Munich, 2012), pp.71–88.

114. E. Hlawitschka, ‘Vom Ausklingen der fränkischen und Einsetzen der deutschen Geschichte’, in C. Brühl and B. Schneidmüller (eds.), Beiträge zur mittelalterlichen Reichs- und Nationsbildung in Deutschland und Frankreich (Munich, 1997), pp.55–81 at 58–69; Althoff, Die Ottonen, pp.230–47.

115. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft, p.61.

116. E. Boshof, Die Salier (5th ed., Stuttgart, 2008), p.98.

117. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft, pp.65–72.

118. Becher, Otto der Große, pp.239–40, 249–50.

119. Thietmar of Merseburg, Chronicon, pp.143–6.

120. Ibid, pp.150–55; Althoff, Otto III, pp.30–40.

121. A. Wolf, ‘Die Herkunft der Grafen von Northeim aus dem Hause Luxemburg und der Mord am Königskandidaten Ekkehard von Meißen 1002’, Niedersächsisches Jahrbuch für Landesgeschichte, 69 (1997), 427–40. For the following: Althoff, Otto III, pp.146–8; Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft, pp.51–7, 92–4.

122. Wipo of Burgundy’s account of Conrad’s succession: T. E. Mommsen and K. F. Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters of the Eleventh Century (New York, 2000), pp.57–65. See also Wolfram, Conrad II, pp. 42–5; Weinfurter, Salian Century, pp.18–24. See pp.189, 194 for Conrad’s struggles over Italy and Burgundy.

123. B. Arnold, German Knighthood, 1050–1300 (Oxford, 1985), pp.23–52, 100–139; W. Hechberger, Adel, Ministerialität und Rittertum im Mittelalter (2nd ed., Munich, 2010), pp.27–34, 91–9; T. Zotz, ‘Die Formierung der Ministerialität’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, III, pp.3–50; Wolfram, Conrad II, pp.169–77.

124. W. Giese, ‘Reichsstrukturprobleme unter den Saliern – der Adel in Ost-sachsen’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, I, pp.273–308.

125. W. Störmer, ‘Bayern und der bayerische Herzog im 11. Jahrhundert’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, I, pp.503–47; P. Johanek, ‘Die Erzbischöfe von Hamburg-Bremen und ihre Kirche im Reich der Salierzeit’, in ibid, II, pp.79–112.

126. O. Engels, ‘Das Reich der Salier – Entwicklungslinien’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, III, pp.479–541.

127. I. Heidrich, ‘Die Absetzung Herzog Adalberos von Kärnten durch Kaiser Konrad II. 1035’, HJb, 91 (1971), 70–94. Further discussion of royal justice on pp.610–25.

128. Printed in B. H. Hill Jr, Medieval Monarchy in Action (London, 1972), pp.205–7. See also Haverkamp, ‘Die Städte im Herrschafts- und Sozialgefüge Reichsitaliens’, p. 169–84.

129. This argument was advanced by E. Boshof, ‘Das Reich in der Krise’, HZ, 228 (1979), 265–87, and has found general acceptance: J. Laudage, Die Salier (2nd ed., Munich, 2007), pp.35–7, 48; W. Hartmann, Der Investiturstreit (3rd ed., Munich, 2007), p.6; F. Prinz, ‘Kaiser Heinrich III. Seine widerspr-chliche Beurteilung und deren Gründe’, HZ, 246 (1988), 529–48; Weinfurter, Salian Century, pp.110–11.

130. Patzold, ‘Konsens und Konkurrenz’, pp.89–97 and the discussion on pp.58–60.

131. B. Arnold, Princes and Territories in Medieval Germany (Cambridge, 1991), pp.95–6.

132. O. Hermann, Lothar III. und sein Wirkungsbereich. Räumliche Bezüge königlichen Handelns im hochmittelalterlichen Reich (1125–1137) (Bochum, 2000).

133. Although exaggerating the degree of consensus, J. Schlick provides a useful discussion of these changes: König, Fürsten und Reich (1056–1159) (Stuttgart, 2001), pp.11–48, 94–5. See also Weinfurter, Salian Century, pp.177–9; Boshof, Die Salier, pp.293–9.

CHAPTER 8: TERRITORY

1. For example, H. Fuhrmann, Germany in the High Middle Ages, c.1050–1200 (Cambridge, 1986), pp.125–86; H. Boldt, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte. I Von den Anfängen bis zum Ende des älteren deutschen Reiches 1806 (3rd ed., Munich, 1994), esp. p.249.

2. D. Matthew, The Norman Kingdom of Sicily (Cambridge, 1992), pp.306–62.

3. A. C. Schlunk, Königsmacht und Krongut. Die Machtgrundlage des deutschen Königtums im 13. Jahrhundert (Stuttgart, 1988), p.16.

4. Fuhrmann, Germany, p.186.

5. K. Görich, Friedrich Barbarossa (Munich, 2011), pp.301–11; F. Opll, Friedrich Barbarossa (4th ed., Darmstadt, 2009), pp.64–6; J. Laudage, Friedrich Barbarossa (1152–1190) (Regensburg, 2009), pp.124–34. According to Fuhrmann, Germany, p.23, annual revenue from Italy under the Staufers totalled 65,000 pounds in silver.

6. A. Haverkamp, ‘Die Städte im Herrschafts- und Sozialgefüge Reichsitaliens’, in F. Vittinghoff (ed.), Stadt und Herrschaft. Römische Kaiserzeit und hohes Mittelalter (Munich, 1982), pp.149–245 at 208–11, 221–3; G. Deibel, ‘Die finanzielle Bedeutung Reichs-Italiens für die staufischen Herrscher des zwölften Jahrhunderts’, ZSRG GA, 54 (1934), 134–77 esp. 143–5. The Lombard League is discussed on pp.569–70.

7. P. Schulte, ‘Friedrich Barbarossa, die italienischen Kommunen und das politische Konzept der Treue’, FMS, 38 (2004), 153–72.

8. H. K. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), I, pp.63–7.

9. M. T. Fögen, ‘Römisches Recht und Rombilder im östlichen und westlichen Mittelalter’, in B. Schneidmüller and S. Weinfurter (eds.), Heilig – Römisch – Deutsch (Dresden, 2006), pp.57–83; J. Dendorfer and R. Deutinger (eds.), Das Lehnswesen im Hochmittelalter (Ostfildern, 2010).

10. J. Ehlers, Heinrich der Löwe (Munich, 2008), pp.21–46; K. Jordan, Henry the Lion (Oxford, 1986).

11. K. Görich, ‘Jäger des Löwen oder Getriebener der Fürsten? Friedrich Barbarossa und die Entmachtung Heinrichs des Löwen’, in W. Hechberger and F. Schuller (eds.), Staufer & Welfen (Regensburg, 2009), pp.99–117.

12. J.-P. Stöckel, ‘Die Weigerung Heinrichs des Löwen zu Chiavenna (1176)’, Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, 42 (1994), 869–82.

13. B. Arnold, Princes and Territories in Medieval Germany (Cambridge, 1991), pp.96–111; Laudage, Barbarossa, pp.271–90.

14. Ehlers, Heinrich der Löwe, pp.375–87.

15. B. U. Hucker, Otto IV. Der wiederentdeckte Kaiser (Frankfurt am Main, 2003); H. Stehkämper, ‘Der Kölner Erzbischof Adolf von Altena und die deutsche Königswahl (1195–1205)’, in T. Schieder (ed.), Beiträge zur Geschichte des mittelalterlichen deutschen Königtums (Munich, 1973), pp.5–83.

16. The charter for the lay lords was initially issued by Henry (VII) in 1231 and confirmed by Frederick a year later. They are printed in K. Zeumer (ed.), Quellensammlung zur Geschichte der deutschen Reichsverfassung in Mittelalter und Neuzeit (Tübingen, 1913), pp.42–4, 51–2.

17. B. Arnold, Medieval Germany, 500–1300 (Basingstoke, 1997), pp.188–9, and his Princes and Territories, pp.17–20.

18. S. Patzold, ‘Konsens und Konkurrenz. Überlegungen zu einem aktuallen Forschungskonzept der Mediävistik’, FMS, 41 (2007), 75–103 at 100–102.

19. E. Schubert, Fürstliche Herrschaft und Territorium im späten Mittelalter (2nd ed., Munich, 2006), p.10; Schulze, Grundstrukturen, I, p.66; Arnold, Princes and Territories, pp.88–9.

20. The main Palatine principalities were Birkenfeld, Neuburg, Simmern, Sulzbach, Veldenz and Zweibrücken. The Welf principalities were Calenberg (Hanover), Göttingen, Grubenhagen, Lüneburg and Wolfenbüttel.

21. Conrad II appears to have been the first to permit this: H. Wolfram, Conrad II, 990–1039 (University Park, PA, 2006), p.192.

22. The others were the duchies of Limburg, Brunswick-Lüneburg, the margraviate of Baden, the counties of Battenberg, Mömpelgard and Reckheim, and the imperial lordships of Anholt, Landscron, Schauen and Wickrath.

23. A. L. Reyscher (ed.), Vollständige, historisch und kritisch bearbeitete Sammlung der württembergischen Gesetze (29 vols., Stuttgart, 1828–51), XIX, part I, p.x; A. Flügel, Bürgerliche Rittergüter. Sozialer Wandel und politische Reform in Kursachsen (1680–1844) (Göttingen, 2000).

24. J. Merz, ‘Bistümer und weltliche Herrschaftsbildung im Westen und Süden des spätmittelalterlichen Reiches’, HJb, 126 (2006), 65–89 at 68–9; Schulze, Grundstrukturen, I, pp.87–90.

25. B. Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider (Munich, 2008), pp.64–71.

26. Schubert, Fürstliche Herrschaft, pp.52–7. See also H. Patze (ed.), Der deutsche Territorialstaat im 14 Jahrhundert (2 vols., Sigmaringen, 1970–71); Boldt, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte, pp.149–246.

27. Arnold, Princes and Territories, p.281.

28. E. Schubert, ‘Die Umformung spätmittelalterlicher Fürstenherrschaft im 16. Jahrhundert’, RVJB, 63 (1999), 204–63 at 229–36; P. Rückert, ‘Von der Stadt zum Amt. Zur Genese württembergischer Herrschafts- und Verwaltungsstrukturen’, ZWLG, 72 (2013), 53–74 at 65. For territorialization generally see P. Moraw, Von offener Verfassung zu gestalteter Verdichtung. Das Reich im späten Mittelalter 1250 bis 1490 (Berlin, 1985), pp.183–201; Arnold, Princes and Territories, pp.152–210.

29. H. Krieg, ‘Die Markgrafen von Baden im Gebiet von Neckar und Murr (11. bis 13. Jh.)’, ZWLG, 72 (2013), 13–32.

30. S. Lorenz, ‘Von Baden zu Württemberg. Marbach – ein Objekt im herrschaftlichen Kräftespiel des ausgehenden 13. Jahrhunderts’, ZWLG, 72 (2013), 33–52 at 48–9; E. Marquardt, Geschichte Württembergs (3rd ed., Stuttgart, 1985), pp.18–23.

31. J. B. Freed, ‘Medieval German social history’, CEH, 25 (1992), 1–26 at 1–2; H. Zmora, The Feud in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 2011), pp.82–99; K. J. MacHardy, War, Religion and Court Patronage in Habsburg Austria (Basingstoke, 2003), p.133.

32. A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411 (Vienna, 2004), pp.178–81; O. Hintze, Die Hohenzollern und ihr Werk (Berlin, 1915), p.75.

33. W. Grube, ‘400 Jahre Haus Württemberg in Mömpelgard’, in R. Uhland (ed.), 900 Jahre Haus Württemberg (Stuttgart, 1985), pp.438–58.

34. J. Whaley, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, 1493–1806 (2 vols., Oxford, 2012), I, p.490; Rückert, ‘Von der Stadt zum Amt’, pp.61–74; Schubert, ‘Die Umformung spätmittelalterlicher Fürstenherrschaft’, pp.209–15.

35. J. Gerchow, ‘Äbtissinnen auf dem Weg zur Landesherrschaft im 13. Jahrhundert. Das Beispiel der Frauenstifte Essen und Herford’, in T. Schilp (ed.), Reform – Reformation – Säkularisation. Frauenstifte in Krisenzeiten (Essen, 2004), pp.67–88 at 84–8.

36. H. E. Feine, Die Besetzung der Reichsbistümer vom Westfälischen Frieden bis zur Säkularisation, 1648–1803 (Stuttgart, 1921); E. J. Greipl, ‘Zur weltlichen Herrschaft der Fürstbischöfe in der Zeit vom Westfälischen Frieden bis zur Säkularisation’, Römische Quartalschrift, 83 (1988), 252–69 esp.257–8.

37. W. Janssen, Das Erzbistum Köln im späten Mittelalter, 1191–1515 (Cologne, 1995); Merz, ‘Bistümer und weltliche Herrschaftsbildung’, pp.75–7.

38. K. E. Demandt, Geschichte des Landes Hessen (2nd ed., Kassel, 1980); W. Dotzauer, ‘Der kurpfälzische Wildfangstreit und seine Auswirkungen im rheinhessisch-pfälzischen Raum’, Geschichtliche Landeskunde, 25 (1984), 81–105; W. B. Smith, Reformation and the German Territorial State: Upper Franconia, 1300–1630 (Rochester, NY, 2008), pp.44–9.

39. H. J. Cohn, The Government of the Rhine Palatinate in the Fifteenth Century (Oxford, 1965); V. Press, Calvinismus und Territorialstaat. Regierung und Zentralbehörden der Kurpfalz, 1559–1619 (Stuttgart, 1970).

40. H. Patze and W. Schlesinger (eds.), Geschichte Thüringens (5 vols., Cologne, 1982).

41. A. D. Anderson, On the Verge of War: International Relations and the Jülich-Kleve Succession Crises (1609–1614) (Boston, 1999). The Austrian succession is discussed on pp.476–9.

42. B. Arnold, German Knighthood, 1050–1300 (Oxford, 1985), pp.17–20, and his Princes and Territories, pp.40–43.

43. Arnold, German Knighthood, pp.103–10, 140–61, 252–5; Moraw, Von offener Verfassung, pp.73–7; Zmora, The Feud, pp.86, 93–4. Aristocratic associations are discussed on pp.553–8.

44. D. Abulafia, Frederick II: A Medieval Emperor (London, 1988), pp.239–49; W. Stürner, Friedrich II. (2 vols., Darmstadt, 2009), II, pp.302–16.

45. H. Dopsch, Österreichische Geschichte, 1122–1278 (Vienna, 2003), pp.189–98.

46. B. Schneidmüller, ‘Konsens – Territorialisierung – Eigennutz. Vom Umgang mit spätmittelalterlichen Geschichte’, FMS , 39 (2005), 225–46 at 236–8.

47. B. Weiler, Henry III of England and the Staufen Empire, 1216–1272 (Woodbridge, 2006), pp.172–97, and his ‘Image and reality in Richard of Cornwall’s German career’, EHR, 113 (1998), 1111–42.

48. G. Wagner, ‘Pläne und Versuche der Erhebung Österreichs zum Königreich’, in idem (ed.), Österreich von der Staatsidee zum Nationalbewußtsein (Vienna, 1982), pp.394–432; Dopsch, Österreichische Geschichte, pp.197–201.

49. T. Reuter, ‘The medival German Sonderweg ? The Empire and its rulers in the high Middle Ages’, in A. J. Duggan (eds.), Kings and Kingship in Medieval Europe (London, 1993), pp.179–211 at 209.

50. M. Spindler (ed.), Handbuch der bayerischen Geschichte (2nd ed., 2 vols., Munich, 1981), I, p.409; P. Moraw, ‘Ruprecht von der Pfalz’, ZGO, 149 (2001), 97–110 at 102.

51. Revenue from B. Guenée, States and Rulers in Later Medieval Europe (Oxford, 1985), p.11.

52. A. Haverkamp, Medieval Germany, 1056–1273 (Oxford, 1988), pp.285, 298. For the following see Schlunk, Königsmacht und Krongut.

53. There were nine: Upper and Lower Swabia, Upper and Lower Alsace, Ortenau, Speyergau, Wetterau, Rothenburg and Nuremberg.

54. M. Prietzel, Das Heilige Römische Reich im Spätmittelalter (2nd ed., Darmstadt, 2010), p.14.

55. P. Moraw, ‘Franken als königsnahe Landschaft im späten Mittelalter’, BDLG, 112 (1976), 123–38; Das Land Baden-Württemberg (issued by the Staatliche Archivverwaltung Baden-Württembergs, Stuttgart, 1974), I, pp.167–9.

56. Prietzel, Reich im Spätmittelalter, p.23.

57. E. Isenmann, ‘Reichsfinanzen und Reichssteuern im 15. Jahrhundert’, ZHF, 7 (1980), 1–76, 129–218 at 12–16.

58. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411, pp.71–86; K. Peball, Die Schlacht bei Dürnkrut am 26. August 1278 (Vienna, 1992).

59. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411, pp.96–105. See pp.586–8 for the Swiss revolt.

60. E. Gatz (ed.), Die Bischöfe des Heiligen Römischen Reiches 1198 bis 1448 (Berlin, 2001), pp.274–6.

61. A. Gerlich, ‘König Adolf von Nassau im Bund mit Eduard I. von England’, NA, 113 (2002), 1–57.

62. K.-U. Jäschke, Europa und das römisch-deutsche Reich um 1300 (Stuttgart, 1999), pp.77–85; Prietzel, Reich im Spätmittelalter, pp.33–4.

63. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411, pp.105–13.

64. J. K. Hoensch, Die Luxemburger (Stuttgart, 2000), pp.11–30; Jäschke, Europa, pp.92–117; Gatz (ed.), Bischöfe 1198 bis 1448, pp.799–802.

65. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411, pp.113–32; Hoensch, Die Luxemburger, pp.71–104.

66. R. Schneider, ‘Karls IV. Auffassung vom Herrscheramt’, in Schieder (ed.), Beiträge, pp.122–50 at 122–3.

67. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411, pp.151–4.

68. Hoensch, Die Luxemburger, pp.166–8; Isenmann, ‘Reichsfinanzen’, p.17.

69. Hintze, Die Hohenzollern, pp.18–25.

70. F. Seibt, Karl IV. (Munich, 1978), pp.314–17; Hoensch, Die Luxemburger, pp.118–32; Moraw, Von offener Verfassung, pp.242–7.

71. Luxembourg itself had already been detached to a separate branch of the family and was pawned in 1388 to Charles IV’s nephew Jobst, eventually passing to the new duchy of Burgundy in 1409. Sigismund pawned Brandenburg to Jobst in 1387 to finance his own election as Hungarian king.

72. B. D. Boehm and J. Fajt (eds.), Prague, the Crown of Bohemia, 1347–1437 (New Haven, CT, 2005); M. V. Schwarz (ed.), Grabmäler der Luxemburger. Image und Memoria eines Kaiserhauses (Luxembourg, 1997), esp. pp.12–16.

73. J. Pánek, ‘Der böhmische Staat und das Reich in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in V. Press (ed.), Alternativen zur Reichsverfassung in der Frühen Neuzeit? (Munich, 1995), pp.169–78 at 170–71.

74. Prietzel, Reich im Spätmittelalter, p.74.

75. H. S. Offler, ‘Empire and papacy: The last struggle’, TRHS, 5th series, 6 (1956), 21–47. For a summary of the situation in Italy from 1250 to 1273, see J. Larner, Italy in the Age of Dante and Petrarch, 1216–1380 (London, 1980), pp.38–45.

76. Isenmann, ‘Reichsfinanzen’, p.17. For Charles’s Italian policy generally see R. Pauler, Die Auseinandersetzungen zwischen Kaiser Karl IV. und den Päpsten (Neuried, 1996).

77. G. Rill, ‘Reichsvikar und Kommissar. Zur Geschichte der Verwaltung Reichsitaliens im Spätmittelalter und in der Frühen Neuzeit’, Annali della fondazione italiana per la storia amministrativa, 2 (1965), 173–98; Hoensch, Die Luxemburger, p.142.

78. S. A. Epstein, Genoa and the Genoese, 958–1528 (Chapel Hill, NC, 1996), p.184.

79. E. Schubert, Königsabsetzung im deutschen Mittelalter (Göttingen, 2005), esp. pp.362–4, 398–403; Moraw, ‘Ruprecht’, pp.100–104. Saxony refused to participate, while the Brandenburg and Bohemian votes were held by the Luxembourgs. For the wider context see F. Rexroth, ‘Tyrannen und Taugenichtse. Beobachtungen zur Ritualität europäischer Königsabsetzungen im späten Mittelalter’, HZ, 278 (2004), 27–53.

80. P. Moraw, ‘Beamtentum und Rat König Ruprechts’, ZGO, 116 (1968), 59–126; Isenmann, ‘Reichsfinanzen’, pp.17–18; Prietzel, Reich im Spätmittelalter, p.100.

81. A. Begert, Die Enstehung und Entwicklung des Kurkollegs (Berlin, 2010), pp.190–92.

82. S. Wefers, Das politische System Kaiser Sigismunds (Stuttgart, 1989); W. Baum, Kaiser Sigismund (Graz, 1993); J. K. Hoensch, Kaiser Sigismund (Munich, 1996).

83. Prietzel, Reich im Spätmittelalter, pp.114–19. See generally H. Angermeier, Die Reichsreform, 1410–1555 (Munich, 1984).

84. Guenée, States and Rulers, pp.96–105; Isenmann, ‘Reichsfinanzen’, 9, 133–7.

85. A. Erler, Die Mainzer Stiftsfehde, 1459–1463, im Spiegel mittelalterlicher Rechtsgutachten (Frankfurt, 1963); D. Brosius, ‘Zum Mainzer Bistumsstreit, 1459–1463’, Archiv für hessische Geschichte und Altertumskunde, new series, 33 (1975), 111–36.

86. Zmora, The Feud, pp.78–80.

87. C. Reinle, Bauernfehden (Stuttgart, 2003), p.254.

88. W. Abel, Agricultural Fluctuations in Europe from the Thirteenth to the Twentieth Centuries (London, 1986), p.87.

89. F. Lot, Recherches sur les effectifs des armées françaises des Guerres d’Italie aux Guerres de Religion, 1492–1562 (Paris, 1962); J. D. Tracy, Emperor Charles V, Impresario of War (Cambridge, 2002), esp. pp.247, 268.

90. S. Wefers, ‘Versuch über die “Außenpolitik” des spätmittelalterlichen Reiches’, ZHF, 22 (1995), 291–316 at 304–9; R. Görner, Raubritter. Untersuchungen zur Lage des spätmittelalterlichen Niederadels, besonders im südlichen Westfalen (Münster, 1987).

91. Angermeier, Reichsreform, pp.84–9.

92. Older historical scholarship was concerned to identify the question of leadership, since this allowed it to apportion blame for the supposed ‘failure’ of reform to create a unitary state.

93. G. Hödl, Albrecht II. Königtum, Reichsregierung und Reichsreform, 1438–1439 (Vienna, 1978).

94. W. Zanetti, Der Friedenskaiser. Friedrich III. und seine Zeit, 1440–1493 (Herford, 1985); Moraw, Von offener Verfassung, pp.379–85, 411–15.

95. A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1400–1522 (Vienna, 2004), pp.242–55, 348–57; P. Csendes, Wien in den Fehden der Jahre 1461–1463 (Vienna, 1974).

96. K. S. Bader, Ein Staatsmann vom Mittelrhein. Gestalt und Werk des Mainzer Kurfürsten und Erzbischofs Berthold von Henneberg (Mainz, 1954–5); H. J. Cohn, ‘The electors and imperial rule at the end of the fifteenth century’, in B. Weiler and S. MacLean (eds.), Representations of Power in Medieval Germany, 800–1500 (Turnhout, 2006), pp.295–318.

97. G. Benecke, Maximilian I (1459–1519) (London, 1982); H. Wiesflecker, Kaiser Maximilian I. (5 vols., Vienna, 1971–86). For Maximilian’s negotiating style see H. Carl, Der Schwäbische Bund, 1488–1534 (Leinfelden-Echterdingen, 2000), pp.503–5, 511.

98. W. Dotzauer, Die deutschen Reichskreise (1383–1806) (Stuttgart, 1998); W. Wüst (ed.), Reichskreis und Territorium (Stuttgart, 2000). The range of Kreise activities is enumerated in NTSR, X, 427–758. The Kreis Assemblies are discussed on pp.415–16.

99. R. Schneider, ‘Landeserschließung und Raumerfassung durch salishe Herrscher’, in S. Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich (3 vols., Sigmaringen, 1991), I, pp.117–38 at 128–30; Isenmann, ‘Reichsfinanzen’, 129–54.

100. S. Rowan, ‘Imperial taxes and German politics in the fifteenth century’, CEH, 13 (1980), 203–17.

101. P. Schmid, Der Gemeine Pfennig von 1495 (Göttingen, 1989), p.564; Isenmann, ‘Reichsfinanzen’, 154–98. For the following see P. Rauscher, Zwischen Ständen und Gläubigern. Die kaiserlichen Finanzen unter Ferdinand I. und Maximilian II. (1556–1576) (Munich, 2004), esp. pp.83–93.

102. The 1521 register is printed in H. H. Hofmann (ed.), Quellen zum Verfassungsorganismus des Heiligen Römischen Reiches deutscher Nation 1495–1815 (Darmstadt, 1976), pp.40–51. The money and troops raised under these arrangements are discussed on pp.446–62.

103. A. Sigelen, Reichspfennigmeister Zacharias Geizkofler zwischen Fürstendienst und Familienpolitik (Stuttgart, 2009); M. Schattkowsky, ‘Reichspfennigmeister im Ober- und Niedersächsischen Reichskreis’, BDLG, 137 (2001), 17–38.

104. B. A. Rautenberg, Der Fiskal am Reichskammergericht (Bern, 2008); M. Schnettger, ‘Das Alte Reich und Italien in der Frühen Neuzeit’, Quellen und Forschungen aus italienischen Archiven und Bibliotheken, 79 (1999), 344–420 at 375–7.

105. P. Moraw, ‘Versuch über die Entstehung des Reichstags’, in H. Weber (ed.), Politische Ordnungen und soziale Kräfte im Alten Reich (Wiesbaden, 1980), pp.1–36. Older scholarship frequently anachronistically applied the label ‘Reichstag’ to these earlier meetings.

106. T. M. Martin, Auf dem Weg zum Reichstag, 1314–1410 (Göttingen, 1993).

107. A. Gotthard, Säulen des Reiches. Die Kurfürsten im frühneuzeitlichen Reichsverband (Husum, 1999); P. Moraw, ‘Fürstentum, Königtum und “Reichsreform” im deutschen Spätmittelalter’, BDLG, 122 (1986), 117–36.

108. H. Cohn, ‘The German imperial diet at the end of the fifteenth century’, in J. Sobrequés et al. (eds.), Actes del 53è congrés de la Comissió Internacional per a l’Estudi de la Història de les Institucions Representatives i Parlementàries (2 vols., Barcelona, 2005), I, pp.149–57.

109. G. Annas, Hoftag – Gemeiner Tag – Reichstag. Studien zur strukturellen Entwicklung deutscher Reichsversammlungen des späten Mittelalters (1349–1471) (2 vols., Göttingen, 2004), I, pp.77–97, 438; H. Angermeier, ‘Der Wormser Reichstag 1495 – ein europäisches Ereignis’, HZ, 261 (1995), 739–68. A more cautious assessment of the 1495 meeting’s novelty is given by P. J. Heinig, ‘Der Wormser Reichstag von 1495 als Hoftag’, ZHF, 33 (2006), 337–57.

110. H. J. Cohn, ‘The German imperial diets in the 1540s’, Parliaments, Estates and Representation, 26 (2006), 19–33. The Religious Peace is discussed on pp.115–17.

111. Benecke, Maximilian, pp.138–9. For the following see H. J. Cohn, ‘Representing political space at a political site: The imperial diets of the sixteenth century’, in B. Kümin (ed.), Political Space in Pre-Industrial Europe (Farnham, 2009), pp.19–42.

112. F. Blaich, ‘Die Bedeutung der Reichstage auf dem Gebiet der öffentlichen Finanzen im Spannungsfeld zwischen Kaiser, Territorialstaaten und Reichsstädten (1495–1670)’, in A. De Maddalena and H. Kellenbenz (eds.), Finanzen und Staatsräson in Italien und Deutschland in der frühen Neuzeit (Berlin, 1992), pp.79–111 at 79–86; J. J. Schmauss and H. C. von Senckenberg (eds.), Neue und vollständige Sammlung der Reichsabschiede (4 vols., Frankfurt am Main, 1747), I, pp.482–92.

113. L. Pelizaeus, Der Aufstieg Württembergs und Hessens zur Kurwürde, 1692–1803 (Frankfurt am Main, 2000).

114. S. W. Rowan, ‘A Reichstag in the reform era: Freiburg im Breisgau, 1497–98’, in J. A. Vann and S. W. Rowan (eds.), The Old Reich (Brussels, 1974), pp.31–57 at 49.

115. The eight elevations were: Hohenzollerns (Swabian line), Fürstenberg, East Frisia, Oldenburg, Nassau, Salm, Schwarzenberg, Schwarzburg. The most prominent of the Habsburg elevations included the Colloredo, Harrach, Khevenhüller, Neipperg, Pückler, Starhemberg, Windischgrätz and Wurmbrand families.

116. E. Böhme, Das Fränkische Reichsgrafenkollegium im 16. und 17. Jahrhundert (Stuttgart, 1989); J. Arndt, Das Niederrheinisch-Westfälische Reichsgrafenkollegium und seine Mitglieder (1653–1806) (Mainz, 1991).

117. H. Neuhaus, Reichsständische Repräsentationsformen im 16. Jahrhundert (Berlin, 1982).

118. T. Klein, ‘Die Erhebungen in den weltlichen Reichsfürstenstand 1550–1806’, BDLG, 122 (1986), 137–92. Those elevated without full votes included Waldeck (1719), Reuss (1778) and Lippe (1789).

119. B. Sicken, Der Fränkische Reichskreis (Würzburg, 1970); P. C. Hartmann, Der Bayerische Reichskreis (1500 bis 1803) (Berlin, 1997); T. Nicklas, Macht oder Recht. Frühneuzeitliche Politik im obersächsischen Reichskreis (Stuttgart, 2002).

120. Mainz chaired the electoral college, while the princely corpus was headed alternately by Austria and Salzburg, and chairmanship of the civic college fell to the city hosting the Reichstag. For the following see K. Schlaich, ‘Maioritas – protestatio – itio in partes – corpus Evangelicorum’, ZSRG KA, 63 (1977), 264–99; 64 (1978), 139–79, and his ‘Die Mehrheitsabstimmung im Reichstag zwischen 1495 und 1613’, ZHF, 10 (1983), 299–340. More extended coverage in NTSR, VI, part 1.

121. For a detailed example see S. Friedrich, ‘Legitimationsprobleme von Kreisbündnissen’, in W. E. J. Weber and R. Dauser (eds.), Faszinierende Frühneuzeit. Reich, Frieden, Kultur und Kommunikation 1500–1800 (Berlin, 2008), pp.27–50.

122. K.-F. Krieger, ‘Der Prozeß gegen Pfalzgraf Friedrich den Siegreichen auf dem Augsburger Reichstag vom Jahre 1474’, ZHF, 12 (1985), 257–86 at 284–6.

123. W. Fürnrohr, ‘Die Vertreter des habsburgischen Kaisertums auf dem Immerwährenden Reichstag’, Verhandlungen des Historischen Vereins für Oberpfalz und Regensburg, 123 (1983), 71–139; 124 (1984), 99–148.

124. Cohn, ‘The German imperial diet at the end of the fifteenth century’, p.152 n.18.

125. B. Rill, Kaiser Matthias (Graz, 1999), pp.222–3.

126. Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider, pp.40–45, 204–66.

127. B. Roeck, Reichssystem und Reichsherkommen (Stuttgart, 1984).

128. For a recent and sophisticated restatement of this interpretation see H. Schilling, ‘Reichs-Staat und frühneuzeitliche Nation der Deutschen oder teilmodernisiertes Reichssystem’, HZ, 272 (2001), 377–95.

129. Cohn, ‘The German imperial diet at the end of the fifteenth century’, p.152.

130. K. Härter, ‘The Permanent Imperial Diet in European context’, in R. J. W. Evans et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Oxford, 2011), pp.115–35.

131. A. Gotthard, Das Alte Reich, 1495–1806 (3rd ed., Darmstadt, 2006); W. Reinhard, ‘Frühmoderner Staat und deutsches Monstrum’, ZHF, 29 (2002), 339–57; and the work cited in n.127.

132. While there is some disagreement over terms, there is broad agreement on the Empire’s complementary character: G. Schmidt, Geschichte des Alten Reiches (Munich, 1999), and his ‘The Old Reich: The state and nation of the Germans’, in Evans et al. (eds.), Holy Roman Empire, pp.43–62; J. Burkhardt, Vollendung und Neuorientierung des frühmodernen Reiches, 1648–1763 (Stuttgart, 2006), pp.26–43, and his ‘Europäischer Nachzügler oder institutioneller Vorreiter?’, in M. Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum – irregulare corpus – Teutscher Reichs-Staat (Mainz, 2002), pp.297–316. Further discussion in P. H. Wilson, The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (2nd ed., Basingstoke, 2011), pp.3–11.

CHAPTER 9: DYNASTY

1. U. Lange, ‘Der ständestaatliche Dualismus – Bemerkungen zu einem Problem der deutschen Verfassungsgeschichte’, BDLG, 117 (1981), 311–34. The territorial Estates are discussed on pp.525–34.

2. P. S. Fichtner, Protestantism and Primogeniture in Early Modern Germany (New Haven, CT, 1989). For the long-running dispute over Ernst’s will and the subsequent partition of Gotha, see S. Westphal, Kaiserliche Rechtsprechung und herrschaftliche Stabilisierung. Reichsgerichtsbarkeit in den thüringischen Territorialstaaten, 1648–1806(Cologne, 2002), pp.104–80.

3. P. H. Wilson, ‘Prussia’s relations with the Holy Roman Empire, 1740–1786’, HJ, 51 (2008), 337–71; M. Kaiser, ‘Regierende Fürsten und Prinzen von Geblüt. Der Bruderzwist als dynastisches Strukturprinzip’, Jahrbuch Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin-Brandenburg, 4 (2001–2), 3–28.

4. T. Sharp, Pleasure and Ambition: The Life, Loves and Wars of Augustus the Strong (London, 2001). For princely mistresses generally see S. Oßwald-Bargende, Die Mätresse, der Fürst und die Macht. Christina Wilhelmina von Grävenitz und die höfische Gesellschaft (Frankfurt am Main, 2000).

5. M. Sikora, ‘Conflict and consensus around German princes’ unequal marriages’, in J. P. Coy et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, Reconsidered (New York, 2010), pp.177–90; U. Keppler, ‘Franziska von Hohenheim’, Lebensbilder aus Schwaben und Franken, 10 (1966), 157–85. Further examples of possible imperial influence in these affairs: S. Westphal, Ehen vor Gericht – Scheidungen und ihre Folgen am Reichskammergericht (Wetzlar, 2008).

6. K. Vocelka and L. Heller, Die private Welt der Habsburger (Graz, 1998).

7. A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411 (Vienna, 2004), pp.135–81.

8. A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1400–1522 (Vienna, 2004), pp.140–63.

9. P. Moraw, ‘Das Reich und Österreich im Spätmittelalter’, in W. Brauneder and L. Höbelt (eds.), Sacrum Imperium. Das Reich und Österreich, 996–1806 (Vienna, 1996), pp.92–130 at 116–19. The Privilegium maius was only revealed as a forgery in 1852.

10. K. Vocelka and L. Heller, Die Lebenswelt der Habsburger (Graz, 1997), pp.161–3.

11. K. Brunner, Leopold der Heilige (Vienna, 2009); A. Coreth, Pietas Austriaca (West Lafayette, IN, 2004), pp.14–18. The date of 1264 is significant, because Urban IV established the feast of Corpus Christi that year.

12. S. Samerski, ‘Hausheilige statt Staatspatrone. Der mißlungene Absolutismus in Österreichs Heiligenhimmel’, in P. Mat’a and T. Winkelbauer (eds.), Die Habsburgermonarchie 1620 bis 1740 (Stuttgart, 2006), pp.251–78.

13. M. Tanner, The Last Descendant of Aeneas: The Hapsburgs and the Mythic Image of the Emperor (New Haven, CT, 1993); G. Althoff, ‘Studien zur habsburgischen Merowingersage’, MIÖG, 87 (1979), 71–100; W. Seipel (ed.), Wir sind Helden. Habsburgische Feste in der Renaissance (Vienna, 2005). See also the sources cited in Chapter 6, notes 39 and 40.

14. H. Duchhardt, Protestantisches Kaisertum und Altes Reich (Wiesbaden, 1977). Bavaria already emerged as the only likely Catholic candidate in 1524: A. Kohler, Antihabsburgische Politik in der Epoche Karls V. (Göttingen, 1982), pp.82–97.

15. General overviews: P. S. Fichtner, The Habsburg Monarchy, 1490–1848 (Basingstoke, 2003); C. W. Ingrao, The Habsburg Monarchy, 1618–1815 (2nd ed., Cambridge, 2000).

16. For example, Ferdinand III’s itinerary: M. Hengerer, Kaiser Ferdinand III. (1608–1657) (Cologne, 2012), pp.167–72.

17. B. Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider (Munich, 2008), pp.201–14.

18. For the debates see C. Opitz (ed.), Höfische Gesellschaft und Zivilisationsprozeß (Cologne, 2005); J. Duindam, Myths of Power: Norbert Elias and the Early Modern European Court (Amsterdam, 1995), and his Vienna and Versailles: The Courts of Europe’s Dynastic Rivals, 1550–1780 (Cambridge, 2003). For the following see also: M. Hengerer, Kaiserhof und Adel in der Mitte des 17. Jahrhunderts (Konstanz, 2004); P. Matˇa, ‘Bohemia, Silesia and the Empire: Negotiating princely dignity on the eastern periphery’, in R. J. W. Evans and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Leiden, 2012), pp.143–65; and the two important articles by V. Press, ‘The Habsburg court as center of the imperial government’, JMH, 58, supplement (1986), 23–45, and ‘Österreichische Großmachtbildung und Reichsverfassung. Zur kaiserlichen Stellung nach 1648’, MIÖG, 98 (1990), 131–54.

19. These statistics come from a paper presented by Klaus Margreiter at the Sixth Early Modern Workshop at the German Historical Institute London in 2007.

20. Breakdown in P. S. Spalding, Seize the Book, Jail the Author (West Lafayette, IN, 1998), p.205. For the Wittelsbach court see A. L. Thomas, A House Divided: Wittelsbach Confessional Court Cultures in the Holy Roman Empire, c.1550–1650 (Leiden, 2010); R. Babel, ‘The courts of the Wittelsbachs c.1500–1750’, in J. Adamson (ed.), The Princely Courts of Europe, 1500–1750 (London, 1999), pp.189–209.

21. This last example comes from a paper given by Eckhart Hellmuth at the Turin Academy of Sciences, April 2012.

22. T. Schenk, ‘Das Alte Reich in der Mark Brandenburg’, Jahrbuch für Brandenburgische Landesgeschichte, 63 (2012), 19–71 at 60–61; G. Benecke, ‘Ennoblement and privilege in early modern Germany’, History, 56 (1971), 360–70; NTSR, XIII, part I, 390, 923–4; XIV, part VII, 15–21.

23. M. Prietzel, Das Heilige Römische Reich im Spätmittelalter (2nd ed., Darmstadt, 2010), p.138; Kohler, Antihabsburgische Politik, pp.73–5.

24. C. Roll, Das zweite Reichsregiment, 1521–1530 (Cologne, 1996); H. Angermeier, ‘Die Reichsregimenter und ihre Staatsidee’, HZ, 211 (1970), 263–315.

25. P. S. Fichtner, Ferdinand I of Austria (New York, 1982); A. Kohler, Ferdinand I, 1503–1564 (Munich, 2003). For the Habsburg lands in this period see the comprehensive study by T. Winkelbauer, Österreichische Geschichte, 1522–1699 (2 vols., Vienna, 2003).

26. L. Groß, ‘Der Kampf zwischen Reichskanzlei und österreichischer Hofkanzlei um die Führung der auswärtigen Geschäfte’, Historische Vierteliahrschrift, 22 (1924–5), 279–312.

27. A. K. Mally, ‘Der österreichische Reichskreis’, in W. Wüst (ed.), Reichskreis und Territorium (Stuttgart, 2000), pp.313–31.

28. P. Rauscher, Zwischen Ständen und Gläubigern. Die kaiserlichen Finanzen unter Ferdinand I. und Maximilian II. (1556–1576) (Munich, 2004), esp. pp.337–40.

29. The city of Besançon was part of the Burgundian Kreis until its annexation by France in 1678. The Austrian Kreis contained the bishoprics of Trent, Brixen, Gurk, Seckau and Lavant, various Teutonic Order possessions, the counties of Schauenburg, Liechtenstein and Hardegg, and the lordships of Wolkenstein, Losenstein and Roggendorf. Incorporation within the Kreis accelerated the existing trend for most of these territories to slip under Austrian suzerainty.

30. T. A. Brady Jr, ‘Phases and strategies of the Schmalkaldic League’, ARG, 74 (1983), 162–81 at 175, 178–9. The Swabian League is discussed on pp.562–6. For the following see also A. Metz, Der Stände oberster Herr. Königtum und Landstände im süddeutschen Raum zur Zeit Maximilians I. (Stuttgart, 2009).

31. V. Press, Das Alte Reich (Berlin, 1997), pp.67–127; N. Mout, ‘Die Niederlande und das Reich im 16. Jahrhundert (1512–1609)’, in V. Press (ed.), Alternativen zur Reichsverfassung in der Frühen Neuzeit? (Munich, 1995), pp.143–68 at 151–5. For the Schmalkaldic War, 1546–7, and Armoured Reichstag, see pp.114–15.

32. F. Göttmann, ‘Zur Entstehung des Landsberger Bundes im Kontext der Reichs-, Verfassungs- und regionalen Territorialpolitik des 16. Jahrhunderts’, ZHF, 19 (1992), 415–44; M. Lanzinner, ‘Der Landsberger Bund und seine Vorläufer’, in Press (ed.), Alternativen, pp.65–80.

33. G. Kleinheyer, ‘Die Abdankung des Kaisers’, in G. Köbler (ed.), Wege europäischer Rechtsgeschichte (Frankfurt am Main, 1987), pp.124–44.

34. A. Gotthard, Säulen des Reiches (Husum, 1999), pp.199–475; A. P. Luttenberger, Kurfürsten, Kaiser und Reich. Politische Führung und Friedenssicherung unter Ferdinand I. und Maximilian II. (Mainz, 1994).

35. H. Sturmberger, Land ob der Enns und Österreich (Linz, 1979), pp.32–75; M. S. Sánchez, ‘A house divided: Spain, Austria and the Bohemian and Hungarian successions’, Sixteenth Century Journal, 25 (1994), 887–903.

36. Saxon policy is analyzed by D. Phelps, ‘The triumph of unity over dualism: Saxony and the imperial elections 1559–1619’, in R. J. W. Evans et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Oxford, 2011), pp.183–202.

37. P. H. Wilson, ‘The Thirty Years War as the Empire’s constitutional crisis’, in Evans et al. (eds.), Holy Roman Empire, pp.95–114. Further discussion on pp.123–5.

38. K. Bierther, Der Regensburger Reichstag von 1640/1641 (Kallmünz, 1971).

39. K. Ruppert, Die kaiserliche Politik auf dem Westfälischen Friedenskongreß (1643–1648) (Münster, 1979); P. H. Wilson, Europe’s Tragedy: A History of the Thirty Years War (London, 2009), pp.716–78.

40. F. Dickmann, Der Westfälische Frieden (7th ed., Münster, 1998), p.494. Excellent overview of the negotiations and treaty terms in K. Repgen, ‘Die Hauptprobleme der Westfälischen Friedensverhandlungen von 1648 und ihre Lösungen’, ZBLG, 62 (1999), 399–438.

41. D. Beales, Joseph II (2 vols., Cambridge, 1987–2009), II, pp.410–11.

42. J. Burkhardt, ‘Das größte Friedenswerk der Neuzeit’, GWU, 49 (1998), 592–612 esp. 600–601; G. Schmidt, ‘The Peace of Westphalia as the fundamental law of the complementary Empire-State’, in K. Bussmann and H. Schilling (eds.), 1648: War and Peace in Europe (3 vols., Münster, 1998), I, pp.447–54.

43. W. Becker, Der Kurfürstenrat. Grundzüge seiner Entwicklung in der Reichsverfassung und seine Stellung auf dem Westfälischen Friedenskongreß (Münster, 1973).

44. A. Müller, Der Regensburger Reichstag von 1653/54 (Frankfurt am Main, 1992). See generally K. O. Frhr. von Aretin, Das Alte Reich, 1648–1806 (4 vols., Stuttgart, 1993–2000), I.

45. A. C. Bangert, ‘Elector Ferdinand Maria of Bavaria and the imperial interregnum of 1657–58’, (University of the West of England, PhD, 2006). Louis’ candidacy is discussed on pp.157–8.

46. J. P. Spielman, Leopold I of Austria (London, 1977); L. and M. Frey, A Question of Empire: Leopold I and the War of Spanish Succession, 1701–1705 (Boulder, CO, 1983).

47. M. Schnettger, Der Reichsdeputationstag, 1655–1663 (Münster, 1996). For the following: A. Schindling, Die Anfänge des Immerwährenden Reichstags zu Regensburg (Mainz, 1991); C. Kampmann, ‘Der Immerwährende Reichstag als “erstes stehendes Parlament”?’, GWU, 55 (2004), 646–62.

48. P. H. Wilson, ‘The German “soldier trade” of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries’, IHR, 18 (1996), 757–92.

49. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, II, p.55. For the following, see ibid, II, pp.54–73.

50. P. Wilson, ‘Warfare in the Old Regime 1648–1789’, in J. Black (ed.), European Warfare, 1453–1815 (Basingstoke, 1999), pp.69–95 at 80.

51. K. Müller, ‘Das “Reichskammerale” im 18. Jahrhundert’, Wiener Beiträge zur Geschichte der Neuzeit, 30 (1993), 152–77; G. Walter, Der Zusammenbruch des Heiligen Römischen Reichs deutscher Nation und die Problematik seiner Restauration in den Jahren 1814/15 (Heidelberg, 1980), pp.11–13.

52. G. Benecke, Society and Politics in Germany, 1500–1750 (London, 1974), p.274. For the pay bill see J. J. Schmauss and H. C. von Senckenberg (eds.), Neue und vollständige Sammlung der Reichsabschiede (4 vols., Frankfurt am Main, 1747), III, pp.350–51, with Zieler quotas at IV, pp.109–14.

53. E. Heischmann, Die Anfänge des stehenden Heeres in Österreich (Vienna, 1925), p.63. The actual matricular register lists 4,202 cavalry and 20,063 infantry, equivalent to 130,676 florins, but the troop numbers were usually rounded down. For the following see W. Schulze, ‘Die Erträge der Reichssteuern zwischen 1576 und 1606’,Jahrbuch für die Geschichte Mittel- und Ostdeutschlands, 27 (1978), 169–85.

54. R. Graf von Neipperg, Kaiser und Schwäbischer Kreis (1714–1733) (Stuttgart, 1991), pp.79–82.

55. Winkelbauer, Österreichische Geschichte, I, pp.481, 493.

56. W. Blockmans, Emperor Charles V, 1500–1558 (London, 2002), p.155. This was equivalent to 2.2 million Castilian ducats. Between 3 and 3.5 million were paid in 1521–48 with the rest thereafter: Winkelbauer, Österreichische Geschichte, I, p.513. Arrears of the various Common Penny grants totalled 400,000 florins by the 1550s: Rauscher,Zwischen Ständen und Gläubigern, p.322. Main sources for Table 10: W. Steglich, ‘Die Reichstürkenhilfe in der Zeit Karls V.’, Militärgeschichtliche Mitteilungen, 11 (1972), 7–55; P. Rauscher, ‘Kaiser und Reich. Die Reichstürkenhilfen von Ferdinand I. bis zum Beginn des “Langen Türkenkriegs” 1548–1593’, in F. Edelmeyer et al. (eds.),Finanzen und Herrschaft. Materielle Grundlagen fürstlicher Politik in den habsburgischen Ländern und im Heiligen Römischen Reich im 16. Jahrhundert (Munich, 2003), pp.45–83.

57. Charles raised 9 million ducats (17.6 million florins) in taxes and loans for military expenses 1543–52: J. D. Tracy, Emperor Charles V, Impresario of War (Cambridge, 2002), p.247. Altogether he borrowed 58 million florins in 1520–56, costing 18 million florins in interest charges: W. Maltby, The Reign of Charles V (Basingstoke, 2002), pp.67–75.

58. P. Rauscher, ‘Comparative evolution of the tax systems in the Habsburg monarchy, c.1526–1740’, in S. Cavaciocchi (ed.), La fiscalità nell’economia Europea secc. XIII–XVIII (Florence, 2008), pp.291–320; O. Pickl, ‘Fiskus, Kirche und Staat in Innerösterreich im Zeitalter der Reformation und Gegenreformation (16./17. Jahrhundert)’, in H. Kellenbenz and P. Prodi (eds.), Fiskus, Kirche und Staat im konfessionellen Zeitalter (Berlin, 1994), pp.91–110; G. Pálffy, ‘Türkenabwehr, Grenzsoldatentum und die Militärisierung der Gesellschaft in Ungarn in der Frühen Neuzeit’, HJb, 123 (2003), 111–48, and his ‘The origins and development of the border defence system against the Ottoman Empire in Hungary’, in G. Dávid and P. Fodor (eds.), Ottomans, Hungarians, and Habsburgs in Central Europe (Leiden, 2000), pp.3–69.

59. Rauscher, Zwischen Ständen und Gläubigern, pp.269–71. Rudolf II’s court cost 419,000 florins annually compared to 650,000 florins under Maximilian II.

60. W. Schulze, Reich und Türkengefahr im späten 16. Jahrhundert (Munich, 1978).

61. P. Rauscher, ‘Nach den Türkenreichstagen. Der Beitrag des Heiligen Römischen Reichs zur kaiserlichen Kriegführung im 17. und frühen 18. Jahrhundert’, in idem (ed.), Kriegführung und Staatsfinanzen. Die Habsburgermonarchie und das Heilige Römische Reich vom Dreißigjährigen Krieg bis zum Ende des habsburgischen Kaisertums 1740(Münster, 2010), pp.433–85 at 444.

62. A. Sigelen, Reichspfennigmeister Zacharias Geizkofler zwischen Fürstendienst und Familienpolitik (Stuttgart, 2009), pp.152–64, 602–7; Rauscher, ‘Nach den Türkenreichstagen’, 451.

63. Sigelen, Reichspfennigmeister Zacharias Geizkofler, p.141. This included money sent by Italian lords and the imperial knights.

64. H.-W. Bergerhausen, ‘Die Stadt Köln im Dreißigjährigen Krieg’, in S. Ehrenpreis (ed.), Der Dreißigjährige Krieg im Herzogtum Berg und in seinen Nachbarregionen (Neustadt an der Aisch, 2002), pp.102–31 at 110–11. Swabia and Franconia paid over 256,000 florins in 1626–30: Rauscher, ‘Nach den Türkenreichstagen’, 445.

65. R. R. Heinisch, Paris Graf Lodron. Reichsfürst und Erzbischof von Salzburg (Vienna, 1991), pp.254, 256–7; R. Weber, Würzburg und Bamberg im Dreißigjährigen Krieg. Die Regierungszeit des Bischofs Franz von Hatzfeldt, 1631–1642 (Würzburg, 1979), pp.268–86; J. F. Foerster, Kurfürst Ferdinand von Köln. Die Politik seiner Stifter in den Jahren 1634–1650 (Münster, 1976), pp.164–7.

66. A. Oschmann, Der Nürnberger Exekutionstag 1649–1650. Das Ende des Dreißigjährigen Krieges in Deutschland (Münster, 1991); T. Lorentzen, Die schwedische Armee im Dreißigjährigen Kriege und ihre Abdankung (Leipzig, 1894), pp.184–92; D. Albrecht, Maximilian I. von Bayern 1573–1651 (Münster, 1998), pp.1087–90; Heinisch,Paris Graf Lodron, pp.289–302.

67. Sources for Table 12: Staatsarchiv Darmstadt, E1, C43 and 3; Rauscher, ‘Nach den Türkenreichstagen’, 465–82; NTSR, IV, 1125–8.

68. G. A. Süß, ‘Geschichte des oberrheinischen Kreises und der Kreisassoziationen in der Zeit des Spanischen Erbfolgekrieges (1679–1714)’, ZGO, 103 (1955), 317–425; 104 (1956), 145–224.

69. Rauscher, ‘Nach den Türkenreichstagen’, 477. These additional contributions are excluded from Table 12.

70. P. H. Wilson, ‘Financing the War of the Spanish Succession in the Holy Roman Empire’, in M. Pohlig and M. Schaich (eds.), The War of the Spanish Succession: New Perspectives, forthcoming.

71. K. Härter, Reichstag und Revolution, 1789–1806 (Göttingen, 1992), pp.422–6, 435–6.

72. The traditional negative interpretation is discussed by H. Neuhaus, ‘Das Problem der militärischen Exekutive in der Spätphase des Alten Reiches’, in J. Kunisch and B. Stollberg-Rilinger (eds.), Staatsverfassung und Heeresverfassung in der europäischen Geschichte der Frühen Neuzeit (Berlin, 1986), pp.297–346. For a reappraisal of the imperial army’s performance in the battle, see P. H. Wilson, German Armies: War and German Politics, 1648–1806 (London, 1998), pp.272–4.

73. H. Neuhaus, ‘Reichskreise und Reichskriege in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in Wüst (ed.), Reichskreis und Territorium, pp.71–88; M. Lanzinner, Friedenssicherung und politische Einheit des Reiches unter Kaiser Maximilian II. (1564–1576) (Göttingen, 1993); Luttenberger, Kurfürsten, Kaiser und Reich, pp.307–444.

74. D. Götschmann, ‘Das Jus Armorum. Ausformung und politische Bedeutung der reichsständischen Militärhoheit bis zu ihrer definitiven Anerkennung im Westfälischen Frieden’, BDLG, 129 (1993), 257–76.

75. Contingents were sent in 1532, 1542, 1552, 1566–7 and 1593–1606. For the latter see J. Müller, ‘Der Anteil der schwäbischen Kreistruppen an dem Türkenkrieg Kaiser Rudolfs II. von 1595 bis 1597’, Zeitschrift des Historischen Vereins für Schwaben und Neuburg, 28 (1901), 155–262; G. Tessin, ‘Niedersachsen im Türkenkrieg, 1594–1597’,NJLG, 36 (1964), 66–106; P. C. Hartmann, ‘Der bayerische Reichskreis im Zeichen konfessioneller Spannungen und türkischer Bedrohung’, ZBLG, 60 (1997), 599–616.

76. B. Rill, Kaiser Matthias (Graz, 1999), p.70.

77. G. E. Rothenberg, The Austrian Military Border in Croatia, 1522–1747 (Urbana, IL, 1960); W. Aichelburg, Kriegsschiffe auf der Donau (2nd ed., Vienna, 1982).

78. For the following see: P. H. Wilson, ‘Strategy and the conduct of war’, in O. Asbach and P. Schröder (eds.), The Ashgate Research Companion to the Thirty Years’ War (Farnham, 2014), pp.269–81, and Wilson, Europe’s Tragedy, passim.

79. G. Mortimer, Wallenstein: The Enigma of the Thirty Years War (Basingstoke, 2010); A. Ernstberger, Hans de Witte, Finanzmann Wallensteins (Wiesbaden, 1954).

80. P. Hoyos, ‘Die kaiserliche Armee, 1648–1650’, in Der Dreißigjährige Krieg (issued by the Heeresgeschichtliches Museum, Vienna, 1976), pp.169–232.

81. Wilson, German Armies, pp.26–68, and the sources cited there.

82. H. Angermeier, ‘Die Reichskriegsverfassung in der Politik der Jahre 1679–1681’, ZSRG GA, 82 (1965), 190–222; H. J. Wunschel, Die Außenpolitik des Bischofs von Bamberg und Würzburg Peter Philipps von Dernbach (Neustadt an der Aisch, 1979).

83. Contemporary criticism in NTSR, vol.16, part 3, p.3. M. Hughes, ‘Die Strafpreussen: Mecklenburg und der Bund der deutschen absolutistischen Fürsten, 1648–1719’, Parliaments, Estates and Representation, 3 (1983), 101–13.

84. Sources for Table 13: P. H. Wilson, ‘The Holy Roman Empire and the problem of the armed Estates’, in Rauscher (ed.), Kriegführung und Staatsfinanzen, pp.487–514 at 513, modified from additional data in Wilson, ‘Financing’, table 1. Note that the forces engaged in the Great Turkish War and Nine Years War need to be combined to give the overall average for the period 1688–97.

85. More detailed breakdown in P. H. Wilson, From Reich to Revolution: German History, 1558–1806 (Basingstoke, 2004), p.226.

86. Wilson, German Armies, pp.226–41, and ‘Armed Estates’, 511–12.

87. S. R. Epstein, Freedom and Growth: The Rise of States and Markets in Europe, 1300–1750 (London, 2000), pp.12–37, 173–4; A. Giddens, The Nation-State and Violence (Berkeley, 1985).

88. O. Volckart, ‘Politische Zersplitterung und Wirtschaftswachstum im Alten Reich, ca. 1650–1800’, VSWG, 86 (1999), 1–38.

89. Statistics from A. Haverkamp, Medieval Germany, 1056–1273 (Oxford, 1988), pp.180, 288. Urban development is discussed on pp.504–24. See also G. Fouquet, ‘Das Reich in den europäischen Wirtschaftsräumen des Mittelalters’, in B. Schneidmüller and S. Weinfurter (eds.), Heilig – Römisch – Deutsch (Dresden, 2006), pp.323–44.

90. N. Brübach, Die Reichsmessen von Frankfurt am Main, Leipzig und Braunschweig (14.–18.Jahrhundert.) (Stuttgart, 1994).

91. F. Blaich, ‘Die Bedeutung der Reichstage auf dem Gebiet der öffentlichen Finanzen im Spannungsfeld zwischen Kaiser, Territorialstaaten und Reichsstädten (1495–1670)’, in A. De Maddalena and H. Kellenbenz (eds.), Finanzen und Staatsräson in Italien und Deutschland in der Frühen Neuzeit (Berlin, 1992), pp.79–111 at 100–110; C. Hattenhauer, Schuldenregulierung nach dem Westfälischen Frieden (Frankfurt am Main, 1998).

92. Rauscher, Zwischen Ständen und Gläubigern, pp.104–16. For the following see H.-J. Gerhard, ‘Ein schöner Garten ohne Zaun. Die währungspolitische Situation des Deutschen Reiches um 1600’, VSWG, 81 (1994), 156–77.

93. C. P. Kindelberger, ‘The economic crisis of 1619 to 1623’, Journal of Economic History, 51 (1991), 149–75.

94. J. O. Opel, ‘Deutsche Finanznoth beim Beginn des dreißigjährigen Krieges’, HZ, 16 (1866), 213–68 at 218–19.

95. The Guardian, 19 Sept. 2007; Süddeutsche Zeitung, 19 and 20 Jan. 2013. See also: S. Leins, Das Prager Münzkonsortium 1622/23 (Münster, 2012); M. W. Paas, The Kipper und Wipper Inflation, 1619–23: An Economic History with Contemporary German Broadsheets (New Haven, CT, 2012).

96. J. A. Vann, The Swabian Kreis: Institutional Growth in the Holy Roman Empire, 1648–1715 (Brussels, 1975), pp.229–39; Winkelbauer, Österreichische Geschichte, I, pp.483–4; Süß, ‘Geschichte des oberrheinischen Kreises’, pp.385–9.

97. W. Hubatsch, Frederick the Great: Absolutism and Administration (London, 1975), pp.138–9; E. Klein, Geschichte der öffentlichen Finanzen in Deutschland (1500–1870) (Wiesbaden, 1974), pp.54–9; H.-G. Borck, Der Schwäbische Reichskreis im Zeitalter der französischen Revolutionskriege (1792–1806) (Stuttgart, 1970).

98. B. Weiler, ‘Image and reality in Richard of Cornwall’s German career’, EHR, 113 (1998), 1111–42 at 1120 and 1136. For the following: I. Bog, Der Reichsmerkantilismus (Stuttgart, 1959); Blaich, ‘Die Bedeutung der Reichstage’, 95–100.

99. E. F. Heckscher, Mercantilism (rev. ed., 2 vols., London, 1935), I, pp.78–109.

100. Vann, Swabian Kreis, pp.241–8.

101. T. C. W. Blanning, Reform and Revolution in Mainz, 1743–1803 (Cambridge, 1974), p.71. For these arguments generally see R. M. Spaulding, ‘Revolutionary France and the transformation of the Rhine’, CEH, 44 (2011), 203–26.

102. B. Simms, The Struggle for Mastery in Germany, 1779–1850 (Basingstoke, 1998); J. G. Gagliardo, Germany under the Old Regime, 1600–1790 (London, 1991), pp.312–53.

103. For contrasting interpretations on whether Habsburg power had peaked before 1705, or did so under Joseph I, see C. W. Ingrao, In Quest and Crisis: Emperor Joseph I and the Habsburg Monarchy (West Lafayette, IN, 1979), pp.31–77; V. Press, ‘Josef I. (1705–1711). Kaiserpolitik zwischen Erblanden, Reich und Dynastie’, in R. Melville et al. (eds.), Deutschland und Europa in der Neuzeit (Stuttgart, 1988), pp.277–97.

104. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, II, pp.97–219.

105. Ingrao, In Quest and Crisis, p.158. For Charles see B. Rill, Karl VI. Habsburg als barocke Großmacht (Graz, 1992).

106. Further discussion of these statistics in Wilson, From Reich to Revolution, pp.308–10.

107. P. H. Wilson, War, State and Society in Württemberg, 1677–1793 (Cambridge, 1995), pp.163–83; P. Sauer, Ein kaiserlicher General auf dem württembergischen Herzogsthron. Herzog Carl Alexander von Württemberg, 1684–1737 (Filderstadt, 2006).

108. This has been termed ‘organizational hypocrisy’: Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider, p.280.

109. D. McKay, The Great Elector (Harlow, 2001). For attempts to reappraise Frederick I see L. and M. Frey, Frederick I: The Man and His Times (Boulder, CO, 1984); F. Göse, Friedrich I. Ein König in Preußen (Regensburg, 2012). For Prussia’s emergence generally see K. Friedrich, Brandenburg-Prussia, 1466–1806 (Basingstoke, 2012); C. Clark,Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600–1947 (London, 2006); P. G. Dwyer (ed.), The Rise of Prussia, 1700–1830 (Harlow, 2000).

110. Wilson, From Reich to Revolution, p.323.

111. Classic account in F. L. Carsten, The Origins of Prussia (Oxford, 1954), pp.179–277. For the following see also P. H. Wilson, ‘Prussia as a fiscal-military state, 1640–1806’, in C. Storrs (ed.), The Fiscal-Military State in Eighteenth-Century Europe (Farnham, 2009), pp.95–124.

112. L. Hüttl, Friedrich Wilhelm von Brandenburg, der Große Kurfürst, 1620–1688 (Munich, 1981), pp.201–95.

113. S. Externbrink, ‘State-building within the Empire: The cases of Brandenburg-Prussia and Savoy-Sardinia’, in R. J. W. Evans and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Leiden, 2012), pp.187–202.

114. A. Berney, König Friedrich I. und das Haus Habsburg (1701–1707) (Munich, 1927); A. Pečar, ‘Symbolische Politik. Handlungsspielräume im politischen Umgang mit zeremoniellen Normen. Brandenburg-Preußen und der Kaiserhof im Vergleich (1700–1740)’, in J. Luh et al. (eds.), Preussen, Deutschland und Europa, 1701–2001(Groningen, 2003), pp.280–95; P. H. Wilson, ‘Prussia and the Holy Roman Empire, 1700–40’, GHIL, 36 (2014), 3–48.

115. P. H. Wilson, ‘Social militarization in eighteenth-century Germany’, GH, 18 (2000), 1–39.

116. R. Endres, ‘Preussens Griff nach Franken’, in H. Duchhardt (ed.), Friedrich der Große, Franken und das Reich (Cologne, 1986), pp.57–79.

117. For Prussian-Saxon rivalry see F. Göse, ‘Nachbarn, Partner und Rivalen: die kursächsische Sicht auf Preußen im ausgehenden 17. und 18. Jahrhundert’, in J. Luh et al. (eds.), Preussen, pp.45–78. For Prussia’s wars see D. E. Showalter, The Wars of Frederick the Great (Harlow, 1996). See also R. Browning, The War of the Austrian Succession(New York, 1993), and the similarly entitled book by M. S. Anderson (Harlow, 1995).

118. T. Biskup, Friedrichs Größe. Inszenierungen des Preußenkönigs in Fest und Zeremoniell, 1740–1815 (Frankfurt, 2012). Among the many biographies the following are worth consulting: T. Schieder, Frederick the Great (Harlow, 2000); J. Kunisch, Friedrich der Große. Der König und seine Zeit (Munich, 2004). Briefer overviews incorporating the research produced for the Frederick tercentenary: J. Luh, Der Große. Friedrich II. von Preußen (Munich, 2011); W. Burgdorf, Friedrich der Große (Freiburg im Breisgau, 2011).

119. R. Zedinger, Franz Staphen von Lothringen (1708–1765) (Vienna, 2008).

120. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, II, pp.413–39.

121. P. C. Hartmann, Karl Albrecht – Karl VII. (Regensburg, 1985), p.95; Wilson, German Armies, pp.247–60.

122. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, II, pp.442–3.

123. Ibid, II, pp.449–58; Hartmann, Karl Albrecht, pp.194, 217–18, 238, 244–5, 254, 285–90; W. von Hofmann, ‘Das Säkularisationsprojekt von 1743. Kaiser Karl VII. und die römische Kurie’, in Riezler-Festschrift (Gotha, 1913), pp.213–59.

124. A. Schmid, Max III. Joseph und die europäischen Mächte. Die Aussenpolitik des Kurfürstentums Bayern von 1745–1765 (Munich, 1987), pp.29–235.

125. Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider, pp.281–4; K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Das Reich (Stuttgart, 1986), pp.27–8.

126. Beales, Joseph II, I, p.119. See also pp.159–63.

127. The diplomatic background is covered by H. M. Scott, The Birth of a Great Power System, 1740–1815 (Harlow, 2006), pp.72–116. See also F. A. J. Szabo, The Seven Years War in Europe, 1756–1763 (Harlow, 2008); M. Persson, ‘Mediating the enemy: Prussian representations of Austria, France and Sweden during the Seven Years War’,GH 32 (2014), 181–200; Aretin, Das Alte Reich, III, pp.81–111.

128. As argued by J. Burkhardt, Vollendung und Neuorientierung des frühmodernen Reiches, 1648–1763 (Stuttgart, 2006), pp.438–41. The war is considered from the Empire’s perspective in Wilson, German Armies, pp. 264–80. For an Austrian perspective see M. Hochedlinger, Austria’s Wars of Emergence, 1683–1797 (Harlow, 2003), pp.330–48.

129. J. Kunisch, Das Mirakel des Hauses Brandenburg. Studien zum Verhältnis von Kabinettspolitik und Kriegführung im Zeitalter des Siebenjährigen Krieges (Munich, 1978).

130. V. Press, ‘Friedrich der Große als Reichspolitiker’, in Duchhardt (ed.), Friedrich der Große, pp.25–56; Wilson, ‘Prussia’s relations’.

131. M. Hanisch, ‘Friedrich II. und die Preussische Sukzession in Franken in der internationalen Diskussion’, in Duchhardt (ed.), Friedrich der Große, pp.81–91; P. P. Bernard, Joseph II and Bavaria (The Hague, 1965); Aretin, Das Alte Reich, III, pp.183–212.

132. J. Lukowski, The Partitions of Poland, 1772, 1793, 1795 (Harlow, 1999); M. G. Müller, Die Teilungen Polens 1772, 1793, 1795 (Munich, 1984); T. Cegielski, Das Alte Reich und die erste Teilung Polens 1768–1774 (Stuttgart, 1988).

133. M. E. Thomas, Karl Theodor and the Bavarian Succession, 1777–1778 (Lewiston, NY, 1989); D. Petschel, Sächsische Außenpolitik unter Friedrich August I. (Cologne, 2000), pp.47–56.

134. Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider, pp.288–97; Beales, Joseph II, II, pp.408–9.

135. K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Heiliges Römisches Reich, 1776–1806 (2 vols., Wiesbaden, 1967), I, pp.164–85, and his Das Alte Reich, III, pp.299–333. Further discussion of this organization’s aims on pp.640–41.

CHAPTER 10: AUTHORITY

1. J. B. Freed, ‘Medieval German social history’, CEH, 25 (1992), 1–26; S. C. Karant-Nunn, ‘Is there a social history of the Holy Roman Empire?’, in R. J. W. Evans et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Oxford, 2011), pp.245–62.

2. A useful summary of these is in C. Veach, Lordship in Four Realms (Manchester, 2014), pp.6–10.

3. B. Arnold, Princes and Territories in Medieval Germany (Cambridge, 1991), pp.67–8.

4. For the debate on this point see H. K. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), I, pp.102–6, II, pp.78–82. For the following see H. Wunder, ‘Peasant communities in medieval and early modern Germany’, Recueils de la Société Jean Bodin pour l’histoire comparative des institutions, 44 (1987), 9–52 esp. 22–3.

5. The literature on this is substantial. Good overviews include A. Verhulst, The Carolingian Economy (Cambridge, 2002); W. Rösener, The Peasantry of Europe (Oxford, 1994), pp.21, 33–44; W. Troßbach and C. Zimmermann, Die Geschichte des Dorfs. Von den Anfängen im Frankenreich zur bundesdeutschen Gegenwart (Stuttgart, 2006), pp.23–6; M. Costambeys et al., The Carolingian World (Cambridge, 2011), pp.234–5, 254–62; J. Laudage et al., Die Zeit der Karolinger (Darmstadt, 2006), pp.172–82.

6. For examples of Frankish landholding patterns, see M. Innes, State and Society in the Early Middle Ages (Cambridge, 2000), pp.51–68.

7. For the possible origins of the hide see W. Goffart, ‘From Roman taxation to medieval seigneurie’, Speculum, 47 (1972), 165–87, 373–94.

8. G. Duby, ‘Medieval agriculture, 900–1500’, in C. M. Cipolla (ed.), The Fontana Economic History of Europe (6 vols., Glasgow, 1972), I, pp.175–220.

9. H. Fuhrmann, Germany in the High Middle Ages c.1050–1200 (Cambridge, 1986), p.37.

10. L. White Jr, ‘The expansion of technology, 500–1500’, in Cipolla (ed.), Fontana Economic History, I, pp.143–74.

11. W. Rösener, ‘Bauern in der Salierzeit’, in S. Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich (3 vols., Sigmaringen, 1991), III, pp.51–73. For Meinward see also H. Wolfram, Conrad II, 990–1039 (University Park, PA, 2006), pp.285–6. For the following see W. Metz, ‘Wesen und Struktur des Adels Althessens in der Salierzeit’, in Weinfurter (ed.),Die Salier und das Reich, I, pp.331–66.

12. J. C. Russell, ‘Population in Europe, 500–1500’, in Cipolla (ed.), Fontana Economic History, I, pp.25–70 at 36; K. Blaschke, Bevölkerungsgeschichte von Sachsen bis zur industriellen Revolution (Weimar, 1967), p.71.

13. W. Abel, Agricultural Fluctuations in Europe from the Thirteenth to the Twentieth Centuries (London, 1986), pp.25–7.

14. G. Fouquet, ‘Das Reich in den europäischen Wirtschaftsräumen des Mittelalters’, in B. Schneidmüller and S. Weinfurter (eds.), Heilig – Römisch – Deutsch (Dresden, 2006), pp.323–44 at 329–30; R. S. Lopez, The Commercial Revolution of the Middle Ages, 950–1350 (Cambridge, 1976).

15. W. Rösener, ‘The decline of the classic manor in Germany during the high Middle Ages’, in A. Haverkamp and H. Vollrath (eds.), England and Germany in the High Middle Ages (Oxford, 1996), pp.317–30; C. Wickham, Early Medieval Italy (Ann Arbor, MI, 1981), pp.111–14, 188.

16. Troßbach and Zimmermann, Die Geschichte des Dorfs, pp.42–3.

17. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung, I, pp.95–6.

18. S. Weinfurter, The Salian Century (Philadelphia, 1999), pp.77–8.

19. Rösener, Peasantry, p.66.

20. W. C. Jordan, The Great Famine: Northern Europe in the Early Fourteenth Century (Princeton, 1996). For the following: O. J. Benedictow, The Black Death, 1346–1353 (Woodbridge, 2004); Abel, Agricultural Fluctuations, pp.35–48, 102–4.

21. T. Scott, Society and Economy in Germany, 1300–1600 (Basingstoke, 2002), pp.72–112.

22. See S. K. Cohn Jr, Lust for Liberty: The Politics of Social Revolt in Medieval Europe, 1200–1425 (Cambridge, MA, 2006), pp.205–27.

23. Rösener, Peasantry, pp.64–82; Duby, ‘Medieval agriculture’, pp.212–15.

24. Abel, Agricultural Fluctuations, pp.45–95.

25. P. H. Wilson, Europe’s Tragedy (London, 2009), pp.781–95; Q. Outram, ‘The socio-economic relations of warfare and the military mortality crises of the Thirty Years’ War’, Medical History, 45 (2001), 151–84, and his ‘The demographic impact of early modern warfare’, Social Science History, 26 (2002), 245–72.

26. J. Whaley, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, 1493–1806 (2 vols., Oxford, 2012), II, p.454; P. H. Wilson, From Reich to Revolution: German History, 1558–1806 (Basingstoke, 2004), pp.50, 310, 323.

27. C. Dipper, Deutsche Geschichte, 1648–1789 (Frankfurt am Main, 1991), pp.10–75; C. Küther, Menschen auf der Straße. Vagierende Unterschichten in Bayern, Franken und Schwaben in der zweiten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts (Göttingen, 1983).

28. Full discussion in M. Cerman, Villagers and Lords in Eastern Europe, 1300–1800 (Basingstoke, 2012).

29. Rösener, Peasantry, pp.81, 104–24. For the following see H. Kaak, Die Gutsherrschaft (Berlin, 1991); J. Peters (ed.), Gutsherrschaft als soziales Modell (Munich, 1995).

30. Rösener, Peasantry, p.117.

31. E. Weis, ‘Ergebnisse eines Vergleichs der grundherrschaftlichen Strukturen Deutschlands und Frankreichs vom 13. bis zum Ausgang des 18. Jahrhunderts’, VSWG, 57 (1970), 1–14; H. Schissler, ‘The social and political power of the Prussian Junkers’, in R. Gibson and M. Blinkhorn (eds.), Landownership and Power in Modern Europe(London, 1991), pp.99–110 at 104; R. Schlögl, ‘Absolutismus im 17. Jahrhundert. Bayerischer Adel zwischen Disziplinierung und Integration’, ZHF, 15 (1988), 151–86.

32. O. von Gierke, Deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (reprint Graz, 1954; first published 1868); P. Blickle, Obedient Germans? A Rebuttal (Charlottesville, VA, 1997); O. Brunner, Land and Lordship: Structures of Governance in Medieval Austria (Philadelphia, 1992).

33. A term from Rösener, Peasantry, p.43. The idea that cities pioneered communal ideology and practice stems from Georg von Below in 1914, but is still often repeated: E. Schubert, Fürstliche Herrschaft und Territorium im späten Mittelalter (2nd ed., Munich, 2006), pp.75–7.

34. D. M. Luebke, His Majesty’s Rebels: Communities, Factions and Rural Revolt in the Black Forest, 1725–1745 (Ithaca, NY, 1997), pp.203–4. For the following see R. von Friedeburg, ‘“Reiche”, “geringe Leute” und “Beambte”: Landesherrschaft, dörfliche “Factionen” und gemeindliche Partizipation, 1648–1806’, ZHF, 23 (1996), 219–65; M. J. Halvorson and K. E. Spierling, Defining Community in Early Modern Europe (Aldershot, 2008).

35. H.-C. Rublack, ‘Political and social norms in urban communities in the Holy Roman Empire’, in K. von Greyerz (ed.), Religion, Politics and Social Protest (London, 1984), pp.24–60; P. Münch, ‘Grundwerte der frühneuzeitlichen Ständegesellschaft?’, and R. Blickle, ‘Nahrung und Eigentum als Kategorien in der ständischen Gesellschaft’, both in W. Schulze (ed.), Ständische Gesellschaft und soziale Mobilität (Munich, 1988), pp.53–72, 73–93.

36. I. Hunter, Rival Enlightenments: Civil and Metaphysical Philosophy in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 2001).

37. R. A. Müller, ‘Die deutschen Fürstenspiegel des 17. Jahrhunderts’, HZ, 240 (1985), 571–97; Schubert, Fürstliche Herrschaft, pp.81–6.

38. NTSR, vol.16, in nine parts.

39. B. Scribner, ‘Communities and the nature of power’, in idem (ed.), Germany: A New Social and Economic History, I, 1450–1630 (London, 1996), pp.291–326; L. Roper, ‘“The common man”, “the common good”, “common women”: Gender and meaning in the German Reformation commune’, Social History, 12 (1987), 1–21.

40. V. Seresse, ‘Schlüsselbegriffe der politischen Sprache in Jülich-Berg und Kleve-Mark um 1600’, in M. Groten et al. (eds.), Der Jülich-Klevische Erbstreit 1609 (Düsseldorf, 2011), pp.69–81; A. Gestrich, Absolutismus und Öffentlichkeit (Göttingen, 1994), pp.79–80.

41. C. Gantet, La paix de Westphalie (1648). Une histoire sociale, XVIIe–XVIIIe siècles (Paris, 2001).

42. A. Wandruszka, ‘Zum “Absolutismus” Ferdinands II.’, Mitteilungen des Oberösterreichischen Landesarchivs, 14 (1984), 261–8. For the debate on absolutism as a historical concept see L. Schilling (ed.), Absolutismus, ein unersetzliches Forschungskonzept? (Munich, 2008); P. H. Wilson, Absolutism in Central Europe (London, 2000).

43. H. M. Scott (ed.), Enlightened Absolutism (London, 1990); P. Baumgart, ‘Absolutismus ein Mythos? Aufgeklärter Absolutismus ein Widerspruch?’, ZHF, 27 (2000), 573–89.

44. W. Schulze, ‘Vom Gemeinnutz zum Eigennutz’, HZ, 243 (1986), 591–626.

45. D. Klippel, ‘Reasonable aims of civil society: Concerns of the state in German political theory in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries’, in J. Brewer and E. Hellmuth (eds.), Rethinking Leviathan (Oxford, 1999), pp.71–98; B. Stollberg-Rilinger, Der Staat als Maschine. Zur politischen Metaphorik des absoluten Fürstenstaats(Berlin, 1986).

46. P. Blickle (ed.), Resistance, Representation and Community (Oxford, 1997).

47. C. Loveluck, ‘Rural settlement hierarchy in the age of Charlemagne’, in J. Story (ed.), Charlemagne (Manchester, 2005), pp.230–58; Costambeys et al., The Carolingian World, pp.229–41.

48. S. Reynolds, Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe, 900–1300 (2nd ed., Oxford, 1997), pp.101–54; Troßbach and Zimmermann (eds.), Die Geschichte des Dorfs, pp.21–34. Nucleated villages may already have existed in parts of the Frankish world by the ninth century, but the evidence is ambiguous.

49. A. Haverkamp, ‘Die Städte im Herrschafts- und Sozialgefüge Reichsitaliens’, in F. Vittinghoff (ed.), Stadt und Herrschaft. Römische Kaiserzeit und hohes Mittelalter (Munich, 1982), pp.149–245 at 153–61.

50. Weinfurter, Salian Century, pp.78–80.

51. B. Diestelkamp, ‘König und Städte in salischer und staufischer Zeit’, in Vittinghoff (ed.), Stadt und Herrschaft, pp.247–97; H. Jakobs, ‘Aspects of urban social history in Salian and Staufen Germany’, in Haverkamp and Vollrath (eds.), England and Germany, pp.283–98; T. Scott, The City-State in Europe, 1000–1600 (Oxford, 2012), pp.17–18.

52. C. Pfister, ‘The population of late medieval and early modern Germany’, in Scribner (ed.), Germany, pp.33–62 at 40–41; G. Franz, Geschichte des deutschen Bauernstandes vom frühen Mittelalter bis zum 19. Jahrhundert (Stuttgart, 1970), pp.120–22; Abel, Agricultural Fluctuations, pp.81–5.

53. J. de Vries, European Urbanization, 1500–1800 (Cambridge, MA, 1984); T. Scott and B. Scribner, ‘Urban networks’, in Scribner (ed.), Germany, pp.113–44; Troßbach and Zimmermann (eds.), Die Geschichte des Dorfs, p.66.

54. For a specific example see G. Strauss, Nuremberg in the Sixteenth Century (2nd ed., Bloomington, IN, 1976), pp.39–56.

55. Troßbach and Zimmermann (eds.), Die Geschichte des Dorfs, pp.31–2.

56. P. Blickle, Das Alte Europa (Munich, 2008), pp.16–38; I. V. Hull, Sexuality, State and Civil Society in Germany, 1700–1815 (Ithaca, NY, 1996), pp.29–51; T. Robisheaux, Rural Society and the Search for Order in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 1989), pp.68–146; D. W. Sabean, Power in the Blood (Cambridge, 1984), pp.199–211, and his Property, Production and Family in Neckarhausen, 1700–1870 (Cambridge, 1990), pp.88–116.

57. For this see O. Mörke, ‘Social structure’, in S. Ogilvie (ed.), Germany: A New Social and Economic History, II, 1630–1800 (London, 1996), pp.134–63 at 156–7.

58. Franz, Geschichte des deutschen Bauernstandes, pp.49–71; Troßbach and Zimmermann (eds.), Die Geschichte des Dorfs, pp.36–43, 78–96.

59. Scribner, ‘Communities’, p.302.

60. L. Enders, ‘Die Landgemeinde in Brandenburg. Grundzüge ihrer Funktion und Wirkungsweise vom 13. bis zum 18. Jahrhundert’, BDLG, 129 (1993), 195–256; J. Peters (ed.), Konflikt und Kontrolle in Guts herrschaftsgesellschaften (Göttingen, 1995); W. W. Hagen, Ordinary Prussians: Brandenburg Junkers and Villagers, 1500–1840(Cambridge, 2002).

61. S. Ogilvie, ‘Village community and village headman in early modern Bohemia’, Bohemia, 46 (2005), 402–51.

62. T. Struve, Salierzeit im Wandel (Cologne, 2006), pp.145–76.

63. H. Keller, ‘Die soziale und politische Verfassung Mailands in den Angfängen des kommunalen Lebens’, HZ, 211 (1970), 34–64 at 51–60; H.-W. Goetz, ‘Gottesfriede und Gemeindebildung’, ZSRG GA, 105 (1988), 122–44.

64. D. J. Hay, The Military Leadership of Matilda of Canossa, 1046–1115 (Manchester, 2008), pp.171–84; C. Brühl, ‘Königs-, Bischofs- und Stadtpfalz in den Städten des “Regnum Italiae” vom 9. bis zum 13. Jahrhundert’, in H. Beumann (ed.), Historische Forschungen für Walter Schlesinger (Cologne, 1974), pp.400–419; C. Wickham, ‘The “feudal revolution” and the origins of Italian city communes’, TRHS, 6th series, 24 (2014), 29–55.

65. Printed in B. H. Hill Jr, Medieval Monarchy in Action (London, 1972), pp.235–6.

66. A. Haverkamp, Medieval Germany, 1056–1273 (Oxford, 1988), pp.162–9, 283–90; H. Stehkämper, ‘Die Stadt Köln in der Salierzeit’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, III, pp.75–152 at 119–30; Fuhrmann, Germany, pp.77–81.

67. P. Dollinger, ‘Straßburg in salischer Zeit’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, III, pp.153–64. See generally Blickle, Das Alte Europa, pp.79–84.

68. E. Maschke, ‘Stadt und Herrschaft in Deutschland und Reichsitalien (Salier- und Stauferzeit)’, in Vittinghoff (ed.), Stadt und Herrschaft, pp. 299–330 at 304–11; L. Martines, Power and Imagination: City-States in Renaissance Italy (London, 1979), pp.14–17.

69. Blickle, Das Alte Europa, pp.164–5.

70. Haverkamp, ‘Die Städte’, pp.200, 219–21. For the following: D. Hay and J. Law, Italy in the Age of the Renaissance, 1380–1530 (London, 1989), pp.47–74; Scott, City-State, pp.64–192; Diestelkamp, ‘König und Städte’, pp.268–78; Maschke, ‘Stadt und Herrschaft’, pp.300–304.

71. H. Maurer (ed.), Kommunale Bündnisse Oberitaliens und Oberdeutschlands im Vergleich (Sigmaringen, 1987).

72. Diestelkamp, ‘König und Städte’, pp.282–94. The charters are discussed on pp.359–60.

73. Leading examples include Mainz, Cologne, Speyer, Worms, Bremen, Lübeck, Hamburg, Strasbourg and Basel.

74. D. Waley, The Italian City-Republics (3rd ed., London, 1988); G. Chittolini, ‘Cities, “city-states” and regional states in north-central Italy’, Theory and Society, 18 (1989), 689–706; Wilson, Reich to Revolution, pp.378–9.

75. Strauss, Nuremberg, pp.45, 51.

76. Haverkamp, ‘Die Städte’, p.236; Scott, City-State, pp.47–51.

77. Stehkämper, ‘Die Stadt Köln’, pp.136–40.

78. J. Larner, Italy in the Age of Dante and Petrarch, 1216–1380 (London, 1980), pp.106–27; Scott, City-State, pp.18–19.

79. Luebke, His Majesty’s Rebels, pp.220–21.

80. Haverkamp, ‘Die Städte’, pp.204–8, 231; Scott, City-State, pp.51–6.

81. S. Ogilvie, State Corporatism and Proto-Industry: The Württemberg Black Forest, 1580–1797 (Cambridge, 1997), pp.59–60.

82. H.-U. Wehler, Deutsche Gesellschaftsgeschichte (5 vols., Munich, 2008); M. Hughes, Early Modern Germany, 1477–1806 (Basingstoke, 1992), pp.110–11; K. Epstein, The Genesis of German Conservatism (Princeton, 1966), pp.62–3, 285–9. For the question of economic decline see T. McIntosh, Urban Decline in Early Modern Germany: Schwäbisch Hall and its Region, 1650–1750 (Chapel Hill, NC, 1997).

83. D. Albrecht, Maximilian I. von Bayern, 1573–1651 (Munich, 1998), pp. 394–418; H. J. Querfurth, Die Unterwerfung der Stadt Braunschweig im Jahre 1671 (Brunswick, 1953).

84. H. T. Gräf, ‘Small towns in early modern Germany: The case of Hesse, 1500–1800’, in P. Clark (ed.), Small Towns in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge, 1995), pp.184–205; Wilson, Reich to Revolution, pp.71, 378–9.

85. R. Endres, ‘Zur wirtschaftlichen und sozialen Lage in Franken vor dem Dreißigjährigen Krieg’, Jahrbuch für fränkische Landesforschung, 28 (1968), 5–52; M. Walker, German Home Towns (2nd ed., Ithaca, NY, 1998).

86. M. Walker, Johann Jakob Moser and the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation (Chapel Hill, NC, 1981).

87. Wipo of Burgundy in T. E. Mommsen and K. F. Morrison (eds.), Imperial Lives and Letters of the Eleventh Century (New York, 2000), pp.70–71.

88. The classic liberal interpretation is presented by F. L. Carsten, Princes and Parliaments in Germany: From the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Century (Oxford, 1959). The debate is summarized by R. Esser, ‘Landstände im Alten Reich’, ZNRG, 27 (2005), 254–71, with new perspectives in G. Ammerer et al. (eds.), Bündnispartner und Konkurrenten der Landesfürsten? Die Stände in der Habsburgermonarchie (Vienna, 2007).

89. K. H. Marcus, The Politics of Power: Elites of an Early Modern State in Germany (Mainz, 2000);

90. R. Straubel, ‘Heer und höhere Beamtenschaft in (spät-)friderizianischer Zeit’, in P. Baumgart et al. (eds.), Die preußische Armee zwischen Ancien Régime und Reichsgr-ndung (Paderborn, 2008), pp.96–106; H. C. Johnson, Frederick the Great and his Officials (New Haven, CT, 1975); Whaley, Germany, II, p.468; Wilson, Reich to Revolution, p.241. The Habsburg statistics exclude clergy and schoolteachers.

91. Their stories are detailed in the contributions by H. T. Gräf and P. H. Wilson in M. Kaiser and A. Pečar (eds.), Der zweite Mann im Staat (Berlin, 2003).

92. K. J. MacHardy, War, Religion and Court Patronage in Habsburg Austria (Basingstoke, 2003), pp.33–4. For European comparisons see B. Guenée, States and Rulers in Later Medieval Europe (Oxford, 1985), pp.171–91.

93. D. Carpanetto and G. Ricuperati, Italy in the Age of Reason, 1685–1789 (London, 1987), pp.54–75; E. L. Cox, The Green Count of Savoy (Princeton, 1967), pp.368–70; G. Symcox, Victor Amadeus II: Absolutism in the Savoyard State, 1675–1730 (London, 1983), esp. pp.58–9.

94. R. Freiin von Oer, ‘Estates and diets in ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire’, Liber memorialis Georges de Lagarde (Louvain, 1970), pp.259–81. For the following see also V. Press, ‘The system of Estates in the Austrian hereditary lands and in the Holy Roman Empire’, in R. J. W. Evans and T. V. Thomas (eds.), Crown, Church and Estates: Central European Politics in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (Basingstoke, 1991), pp.1–22.

95. See the contributions of E. Harding, T. Neu and D. M. Luebke in J. P. Coy et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, Reconsidered (New York, 2010).

96. A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411 (Vienna, 2004), pp.285–301.

97. H. G. Koenigsberger, Monarchies, States Generals and Parliaments: The Netherlands in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries (Cambridge, 2001).

98. T. Winkelbauer, ‘Landhaus und Hofburg’, in H. Manikowska and J. Pánek (eds.), Political Culture in Central Europe (Prague, 2005), pp.299–331.

99. As argued by P. Blickle, Landschaften im Alten Reich (Munich, 1973).

100. B. Stollberg-Rilinger, Vormünder des Volkes? Konzepte landständischer Repräsentation in der Spätphase des Alten Reiches (Berlin, 1999); H. Dreitzel, Absolutismus und ständische Verfassung in Deutschland (Mainz, 1992). The Estates’ potential to become modern parliaments and form republics is discussed further on pp.594–602.

101. G. Haug-Moritz, Die württembergische Ehrbarkeit. Annäherungen an eine bürgerliche Machtelite der Frühen Neuzeit (Ostfildern, 2009). See also K. Vetter, ‘Die Stände im absolutistischen Preußen’, Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, 24 (1976), 1290–306.

102. G. Droege, ‘Die finanziellen Grundlagen des Territorialstaates in West- und Ostdeutschland an der Wende vom Mittelalter zur Neuzeit’, VSWG, 53 (1966), 145–61; U. Schirmer, Kursächsische Staatsfinanzen (1456–1656) (Stuttgart, 2006).

103. W. Schulze, Reich und Türkengefahr im späten 16. Jahrhundert (Munich, 1978), pp.223–301.

104. P. H. Wilson, War, State and Society in Württemberg, 1677–1793 (Cambridge, 1995), pp.37, 208.

105. J. Brewer, The Sinews of Power: War, Money and the English State, 1688–1783 (New York, 1988). See also the useful survey across Europe by R. G. Asch, ‘Kriegsfinanzierung, Staatsbildung und ständische Ordnung in Westeuropa im 17. und 18. Jahrhundert’, HZ, 268 (1999), 635–71.

106. For these debates see G. Oestreich, Neostoicism and the Early Modern State (Cambridge, 1982); G. Lottes, ‘Disziplin und Emanzipation. Das Sozialdisziplinierungskonzept und die Interpretation der frühneuzeitlichen Geschichte’, Westfälische Forschungen, 42 (1992), 63–74. One variant of this approach adds Reformation theology into the mix: R. Po-chia Hsia, Social Discipline in the Reformation: Central Europe, 1550–1750 (London, 1989); P. S. Gorski, The Disciplinary Revolution: Calvinism and the Rise of the State in Early Modern Europe (Chicago, 2003).

107. H. Keller, ‘Vom “heiligen Buch” zur “Buchführung”. Lebensfunktionen der Schrift im Mittelalter’, FMS, 26 (1992), 1–31 at 21–9. For the following: V. Groebner, Who Are You? Identification, Deception and Surveillance in Early Modern Europe (New York, 2007); I. F. McNeely, The Emancipation of Writing: German Civil Society in the Making, 1790s–1820s (Berkeley, CA, 2003), esp. pp.35–48.

108. Whaley, Germany, I, p.493. Full coverage in K. Härter and M. Stolleis (eds.), Repertorium der Policeyordnungen der Frühen Neuzeit (10 vols., Frankfurt, 1996–2010). See also K. Härter, ‘Security and “Gute Policey” in early modern Europe: Concepts, laws and instruments’, Historical Social Research, 35 (2010), 41–65.

109. Dipper, Deutsche Geschichte, pp.70–73.

110. A. Holenstein, ‘Gute Policey’ und lokale Gesellschaft im Staat des Ancien Régime. Das Fallbeispiel der Markgrafschaft Baden(-Durlach) (Epfendorf, 2003).

111. P. Warde, Ecology, Economy and State Formation in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 2006).

112. Quote from Walker, German Home Towns, p.145. There is an extensive literature highlighting the negative impact of cameralist and police measures: H. Rebel, Peasant Classes: The Bureaucratization of Property and Family Relations under Early Habsburg Absolutism, 1511–1636 (Princeton, 1983); A. Wakefield, The Disordered Police State: German Cameralism as Science and Practice (Chicago, 2009); P. K. Taylor, Indentured to Liberty: Peasant Life and the Hessian Military State, 1688–1815 (Ithaca, NY, 1994).

113. J. Schlumbohm, ‘Gesetze, die nicht durchgesetzt werden – Ein Strukturmerkmal des frühneuzeitlichen Staates?’, Geschichte und Gesellschaft, 23 (1997), 647–63; K. Wegert, Popular Culture, Crime and Social Control in 18th-Century Württemberg (Stuttgart, 1994).

114. A. Holenstein, ‘Empowering interactions: Looking at statebuilding from below’, in W. Blockmans et al. (eds.), Empowering Interactions: Political Cultures and the Emergence of the State in Europe, 1300–1900 (Farnham, 2009), pp.1–31.

115. U. Rublack, The Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany (Oxford, 1999); R. Blickle, ‘Peasant protest and the language of women’s petitions: Christina Vend’s supplications of 1629’, in U. Rublack (ed.), Gender in Early Modern German History (Cambridge, 2002), pp.177–99.

116. The term ‘inner dynamism’ comes from M. Raeff, The Well-Ordered Police State: Social and Institutional Change through Law in the Germanies and Russia, 1600–1800 (New Haven, CT, 1983).

117. NTSR, XIV, 253.

118. P. H. Wilson, ‘Johann Jacob Moser und die württembergische Politik’, in A. Gestrich and R. Lächele (eds.), Johann Jacob Moser. Politiker, Pietist und Publizist (Karlsruhe, 2002), pp.1–25, and his War, State and Society, pp.213–33.

119. G. Haug-Moritz, Württembergischer Ständekonflikt und deutscher Dualismus (Stuttgart, 1992), pp.295–453.

120. NTSR, XIV, 249. For the following see W. Kohl (ed.), Westfälische Geschichte (3 vols., Düsseldorf, 1983–4), I, pp.620–21; NTSR, XVI, part 3, 31–96.

121. For a measured statement of this interpretation see J. J. Sheehan, German History, 1770–1866 (Oxford, 1989), pp.11–71.

122. Useful contributions to the extensive literature on this topic include: C. W. Ingrao, The Hessian Mercenary State: Ideas, Institutions and Reform under Frederick II, 1760–1785 (Cambridge, 1987); S. Mörz, Aufgeklärter Absolutismus in der Kurpfalz während der Mannheimer Regierungszeit des Kurfürsten Karl Theodor (1742–1777)(Stuttgart, 1991); Scott (ed.), Enlightened Absolutism, and the special issue of GH, 20 (2002), no.3 on the electorates.

123. J. Q. Whitman, The Legacy of Roman Law in the German Romantic Era (Princeton, 1990), pp.41–65.

124. E. F. Heckscher, Mercantilism (rev. ed., 2 vols., London, 1935), I, pp.70, 118.

125. M. Hochedlinger, Austria’s Wars of Emergence, 1683–1797 (Harlow, 2003), pp.280–85; P. H. Wilson, German Armies: War and German Politics, 1648–1806 (London, 1998), p.235. More detail in P. G. M. Dickson, Finance and Government under Maria Theresia, 1740–1780 (2 vols., Oxford, 1987).

126. S. Westphal, Kaiserliche Rechtsprechung und herrschaftliche Stabilisierung (Cologne, 2002), p.315.

127. H. J. Brandt and K. Hengst, Geschichte des Erzbistums Paderborn (2 vols., Paderborn, 2002–7), II, pp.111–12.

128. F. Göse, ‘Das Verhältnis Friedrich Wilhelms I. zum Adel’, in F. Beck and J. H. Schoeps (eds.), Der Soldatenkönig (Potsdam, 2003), pp.99–138 at 101–8.

129. Krieg gegen die französischen Revolution, 1792–7 (issued by the Austrian Kriegsarchiv, 2 vols., Vienna, 1905), I, p.189.

130. H.-P. Ullmann, ‘The emergence of modern public debts in Bavaria and Baden between 1780 and 1820’, in P.-C. Witt (ed.), Wealth and Taxation in Central Europe (Leamington Spa, 1987), pp.63–79.

131. Blickle, Landschaften, p.116.

132. H. Wunder, ‘Finance in the “economy of Old Europe”: The example of peasant credit from the late Middle Ages to the Thirty Years War’, in Witt (ed.), Wealth and Taxation, pp.19–47; Robisheaux, Rural Society.

133. V. Press, ‘Die Reichsstadt in der altständischen Gesellschaft’, in J. Kunisch (ed.), Neue Studien zur frühneuzeitlichen Reichsgeschichte (Berlin, 1987), pp.9–42; W. D. Godsey Jr, Nobles and Nation in Central Europe: Free Imperial Knights in the Age of Revolution, 1750–1850 (Cambridge, 2004), pp.22–46; M. Fimpel, Reichsjustiz und Territorialstaat. Württemberg als Kommissar von Kaiser und Reich im Schwäbischen Kreis (1648–1806) (Tübingen, 1999), pp.42–3; Westphal, Kaiserliche Rechtsprechung, pp.256–431; R. Hildebrandt, ‘Rat contra Bürgerschaft. Die Verfassungskonflikte in den Reichsstädten des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts’, Zeitschrift für Stadtgeschichte, Stadtsoziologie und Denkmalpflege, 1 (1974), 221–41 at 230–34.

134. C. Cramer, ‘Territoriale Entwicklung’, in B. Martin and R. Wetekam (eds.), Waldeckische Landeskunde (Korbach, 1971), pp.171–262 at 249–50.

135. G. Kollmer, Die schwäbische Reichsritterschaft zwischen Westfälischem Frieden und Reichsdeputationshauptschluß (Stuttgart, 1979); K.-P. Schroeder, Das Alte Reich und seine Städte. Untergang und Neubeginn. Die Mediatisierung der oberdeutschen Reichsstädte im Gefolge des Reichsdeputationshauptschlusses, 1802/03 (Munich, 1991); A. von Reden-Dohna, ‘Problems of small Estates of the Empire: The example of the Swabian imperial prelates’, JMH, 58, supplement (1986), 76–87.

136. Figures from Hochedlinger, Austria’s Wars, p.284; Ullmann, ‘The emergence of modern public debts’, passim.

CHAPTER 11: ASSOCIATION

1. B. Heal, The Cult of the Virgin Mary in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 2007).

2. H. Carl, Der Schwäbische Bund, 1488–1534 (Leinfelden-Echterdingen, 2000), pp.189–91; L. Ognois, ‘Politische Instrumentalisierung eines christlichen Ereignisses? Die Festtaufe Friedrichs von Württemberg im Jahre 1616’, in A. Ernst and A. Schindling (eds.), Union und Liga 1608/09 (Stuttgart, 2010), pp.227–63.

3. Useful summaries of the extensive literature on this: S. Reynolds, Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe, 900–1300 (2nd ed., Oxford, 1997), pp.67–78, 165–8; H. K. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), II, pp.184–98; T. A. Brady Jr, ‘Economic and social institutions’, in B. Scribner (ed.), Germany: A New Social and Economic History, I, 1450–1630 (London, 1996), pp. 259–90 at 266–70; O. Ogilvie, ‘The beginnings of industrialization’, in idem (ed.), Germany: A New Social and Economic History, II, 1630–1800 (London, 1996), pp.263–308 at 285–90.

4. B. A. Tlusty, The Martial Ethic in Early Modern Germany: Civic Duty and the Right of Arms (Basingstoke, 2011), pp.189–210.

5. Statistics from J. Whaley, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, 1493–1806 (2 vols., Oxford, 2012), II, p.466.

6. M. Asche, Von der reichen hansischen Bürgeruniversität zur armen mecklenburgischen Landeshochschule (Stuttgart, 2000), p.245.

7. T. M. Martin, Auf dem Weg zum Reichstag, 1314–1410 (Göttingen, 1993), pp.172–213; E. Schubert, ‘Die Stellung der Kurfürsten in der spätmittelalterlichen Reichsverfassung’, Jahrbuch für westdeutsche Landes-geschichte, 1 (1975), 97–128.

8. Printed in L. Weinrich (ed.), Quellen zur Verfassungsgeschichte des römisch-deutschen Reiches im Spätmittelalter (1250–1500) (Darmstadt, 1983), no.88. For the following see H. Cohn, ‘The electors and imperial rule at the end of the fifteenth century’, in B. Weiler and S. MacLean (eds.), Representations of Power in Medieval Germany, 800–1500 (Turnhout, 2006), pp.295–318.

9. A. Gotthard, ‘“Als furnembsten Gliedern des Heiligen Reichs”. Überlegungen zur Rolle der rheinischen Kurfürstengruppe in der Reichspolitik des 16. Jahrhunderts’, RVJB, 59 (1995), 31–78, and his Säulen des Reiches. Die Kurfürsten im frühneuzeitlichen Reichsverband (Husum, 1999), pp.35–197.

10. As suggested by older literature like W. R. Hitchcock, The Background of the Knights’ Revolt, 1522–1523 (Berkeley, 1958). For the following: H. Zmora, ‘Princely state-making and the “crisis of the aristocracy” in late medieval Germany’, P&P, 153 (1996), 37–63; W. Friedensburg, ‘Franz von Sickingen’, in J. von Pflugk-Harttung (ed.),Im Morgenrot der Reformation (Stuttgart, 1927), pp.557–666; E. Schubert, ‘Ulrich von Hutten (1488–1523)’, Fränkische Lebensbilder, 9 (1980), 93–123; H. Ulmschneider, Götz von Berlichingen (Sigmaringen, 1974).

11. E. Schubert, ‘Die Harzgrafen im ausgehenden Mittelalter’, in J. Rogge and U. Schirmer (eds.), Hochadelige Herrschaft im mitteldeutschen Raum (1200 bis 1600) (Leipzig, 2003), pp.13–115.

12. K. E. Demandt, Geschichte des Landes Hessen (2nd ed., Kassel, 1980), pp.469–70; Schulze, Grundstrukturen, II, pp.116–18.

13. A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1400–1522 (Vienna, 2004), pp.238–57.

14. M. Spindler (ed.), Handbuch der bayerischen Geschichte (2nd ed., 2 vols., Munich, 1981), II, pp.310–16, 556; M. J. LeGates, ‘The knights and the problems of political organizing in sixteenth-century Germany’, CEH, 7 (1974), 99–136; E. Pflichthofer, Das württembergische Heerwesen am Ausgang des Mittelalters (Tübingen, 1938), pp.13–15; Carl, Der Schwäbische Bund, pp.116–18.

15. F. R. H. Du Boulay, Germany in the Later Middle Ages (London, 1983), pp.74–6; Carl, Der Schwäbische Bund, pp.64–5, 99–111.

16. H. Zmora, State and Nobility in Early Modern Germany: The Knightly Feud in Franconia, 1440–1567 (Cambridge, 1997), pp.129–30.

17. L. F. Heyd, Ulrich, Herzog zu Württemberg (3 vols., Stuttgart, 1841–4).

18. Succinct summary in Whaley, Germany, I, pp.209–19, with the events in J. Heilmann, Kriegsgeschichte von Bayern, Franken, Pfalz und Schwaben von 1506–1651 (2 vols., Munich, 1868), I, pp.29–35.

19. H. Zmora, ‘The formation of the imperial knighthood in Franconia’, in R. J. W. Evans et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Oxford, 2011), pp.283–302, and his State and Nobility, pp.123–42.

20. See the three pieces by V. Press: ‘Kaiser und Reichsritterschaft’, in R. Endres (ed.), Adel in der Frühneuzeit (Cologne, 1991), pp.163–94; ‘Die Reichsritterschaft im Reich der frühen Neuzeit’, NA, 87 (1976), 101–22; ‘Die Ritterschaft im Kraichgau zwischen Reich und Territorium, 1500–1623’, ZGO, 122 (1974), 35–98.

21. Good overviews in H. Rabe, Deutsche Geschichte, 1500–1600 (Munich, 1991), pp.476–8; P. S. Fichtner, Emperor Maximilian II (New Haven, CT, 2001), pp.141–4.

22. V. Press, ‘Reichsritterschaften’, in K. G. A. Jeserich et al. (eds.), Deutsche Verwaltungsgeschichte, I, Vom Spätmittelalter bis zum Ende des Reiches (Stuttgart, 1983), pp.679–89; NTSR, XVII, 386.

23. R. J. Ninness, Between Opposition and Collaboration: Nobles, Bishops and the German Reformations in the Prince-Bishopric of Bamberg, 1555–1619 (Leiden, 2011); S. Schraut, Das Haus Schönborn. Eine Familienbiographie. Katholischer Reichsadel, 1640–1840 (Paderborn, 2005).

24. G. Köbler, Historisches Lexikon der deutschen Länder (5th ed., Munich, 1995), p.xxii.

25. V. Press, ‘Der württembergische Angriff auf die Reichsritterschaft 1749–1754 (1770)’, in F. Quarthal (ed.), Zwischen Schwarzwald und Schwäbischer Alb (Sigmaringen, 1984), pp.329–48.

26. G. Schmidt, Der Wetterauer Grafenverein (Marburg, 1989).

27. R. Endres, ‘Die Friedensziele der Reichsritterschaft’, in H. Duchhardt (ed.), Der Westfälische Friede (Münster, 1998), pp.565–78.

28. E. Bock, Der Schwäbische Bund und seine Verfassungen, 1488–1534 (Breslau, 1927). For the following see C. Greiner, ‘Die Politik des Schwäbischen Bundes während des Bauernkrieges 1524 und 1525 bis zum Vertrag von Weingarten’, Zeitschrift des historischen Vereins für Schwaben und Neuburg, 68 (1974), 7–94.

29. Carl, Der Schwäbische Bund, pp.33–4, 365–6, 370–86.

30. E. Fabian, Die Entstehung des Schmalkaldischen Bundes und seiner Verfassung 1524/29–1531/35 (Tübingen, 1962); G. Haug-Moritz, Der Schmalkaldische Bund 1530–1541/42 (Leinfelden-Echterdingen, 2002). For the other organizations see F. Neuer-Landfried, Die Katholische Liga. Gründung, Neugründung und Organisation eines Sonderbundes, 1608–1620 (Kallmünz, 1968); T. Hölz, Krummstab und Schwert. Die Liga und die geistlichen Reichsstände Schwabens, 1609–1635 (Leinfelden-Echterdingen, 2001); A. Gotthard, ‘Protestantische “Union” und Katholische “Liga” – Subsidiäre Strukturelemente oder Alternativentwürfe?’, and H. Langer, ‘Der Heilbronner Bund (1633–35)’, both in V. Press (ed.), Alternativen zur Reichsverfassung in der Frühen Neuzeit? (Munich, 1995), pp.81–112, 113–22, and the contributions to Ernst and Schindling (eds.), Union und Liga.

31. T. A. Brady Jr, ‘Phases and strategies of the Schmalkaldic League’, ARG, 74 (1983), 162–81 at 174.

32. M. Kaiser, Politik und Kriegführung. Maximilian von Bayern, Tilly und die Katholische Liga im Dreißigjährigen Krieg (Münster, 1999).

33. K. S. Bader, Der deutsche Südwesten in seiner territorialstaatlichen Entwicklung (2nd ed., Sigmaringen, 1978), pp.191–7.

34. Hölz, Krummstab und Schwert, p.140. See also J. A. Vann, The Swabian Kreis (Brussels, 1975), pp.97–131; P.-C. Storm, Der Schwäbische Kreis als Feldherr (Berlin, 1974), pp.71–111.

35. F. Magen, ‘Die Reichskreise in der Epoche des Dreißigjährigen Krieges’, ZHF, 9 (1982), 409–60; S. Friedrich, ‘Legitimationsprobleme von Kreisbündnissen’, in W. E. J. Weber and R. Dauser (eds.), Faszinierende Frühneuzeit. Reich, Frieden, Kultur und Kommunikation, 1500–1800 (Berlin, 2008), pp.27–50.

36. R. Schnur, Der Rheinbund von 1658 in der deutschen Verfassungsgeschichte (Bonn, 1955). Further discussion of princely alliances in P. H. Wilson, German Armies: War and German Politics, 1648–1806 (London, 1998), pp.150–78.

37. K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin (ed.), Der Kurfürst von Mainz und die Kreisassoziationen, 1648–1746 (Wiesbaden, 1975); R. H. Thompson, Lothar Franz von Schönborn and the Diplomacy of the Electorate of Mainz (The Hague, 1973); Wilson, German Armies, pp.165–201.

38. B. Sicken, Das Wehrwesen des fränkischen Reichskreises. Aufbau und Struktur (1681–1714) (Nuremberg, 1967), esp. pp.87–92; M. Plassmann, Krieg und Defension am Oberrhein (Berlin, 2000).

39. P. H. Wilson, ‘The German “soldier trade” of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries’, IHR, 18 (1996), 757–92, and his German Armies, pp.202–97.

40. K. Graf, ‘Feindbild und Vorbild. Bemerkungen zur städtischen Wahrnehmung des Adels’, ZGO, 141 (1993), 121–54; B. Arnold, Princes and Territories in Medieval Germany (Cambridge, 1991), pp.167–76.

41. Dassel’s exact responsibility remains disputed, but is stressed by P. Munz, Frederick Barbarossa (London, 1969), pp.92–5, 180–83. See generally G. Raccagni, The Lombard League, 1164–1225 (Oxford, 2010).

42. P. Dollinger, The German Hansa (London, 1970); J. Schildhauer, The Hansa (New York, 1988); M. Puhle, ‘Die Hanse, Nordeuropa und das mittelalterliche Reich’, in B. Schneidmüller and S. Weinfurter (eds.), Heilig – Römisch – Deutsch (Dresden, 2006), pp.308–22.

43. H. Spruyt, The Sovereign State and its Competitors (Princeton, 1994), esp. pp.109–29.

44. Statistics from P. Moraw, Von offener Verfassung zu gestalteter Verdichtung. Das Reich im späten Mittelalter 1250 bis 1490 (Berlin, 1985), p.309.

45. Dortmund, Goslar, Nordhausen, Mühlhausen in Thuringia, and (from 1475) Cologne were the only northern cities to follow Lübeck’s example and secure imperial city status during the Middle Ages.

46. Arnold, Princes and Territories, pp.57–8, 173–4.

47. A. Buschmann, ‘Der Rheinische Bund von 1254–1257’, in H. Maurer (ed.), Kommunale Bündnisse Oberitaliens und Oberdeutschlands im Vergleich (Sigmaringen, 1987), pp.167–212. For the context see M. Kaufhold, Deutsches Interregnum und europäische Politik. Konfliktlösungen und Entscheidungsstrukturen, 1230–1280 (Hanover, 2000).

48. A. Haverkamp, Medieval Germany, 1056–1273 (Oxford, 1988), p.26; Moraw, Von offener Verfassung, pp.208–9.

49. T. M. Martin, Auf dem Weg zum Reichstag, 1314–1410 (Göttingen, 1993), pp.276–316.

50. Ibid, pp.295–6. Charles’s change of course is also discussed on pp.389–90. For the following also: F. Seibt, Karl IV. (Munich, 1978), pp.332–5; Spindler (ed.), Handbuch der bayerischen Geschichte, II, pp.226–8.

51. E. Gatz (ed.), Die Bischöfe des Heiligen Römischen Reiches 1198 bis 1448 (Berlin, 2001), pp.672–3; Spindler (ed.), Handbuch der bayerischen Geschichte, II, pp.230–32.

52. E. Marquardt, Geschichte Württembergs (3rd ed., Stuttgart, 1985), pp. 23–4; M. Prietzel, Das Heilige Römische Reich im Spätmittelalter (2nd ed., Darmstadt, 2010), p.98.

53. E. Schubert, ‘Albrecht Achilles, Markgraf von Kulmbach und Kurfürst von Brandenburg, 1414–1486’, Fränkische Lebensbilder, 4 (1971), 130–72; Moraw, Von offener Verfassung, pp.277–8. The Lake Constance group disintegrated amidst the war with ducal Burgundy in 1474.

54. G. Strauss, Nuremberg in the Sixteenth Century (2nd ed., Bloomington, IN, 1976), pp.12–17.

55. P. Blickle, Communal Reformation: The Quest for Salvation in Sixteenth-Century Germany (Atlantic Highlands, NJ, 1992); B. Moeller, Imperial Cities and the Reformation (Philadelphia, 1972); L. J. Abray, The People’s Reformation: Magistrates, Clergy and Commons in Strasbourg, 1500–1598 (Oxford, 1985).

56. G. Schmidt, ‘Hanse, Hanseaten und Reich in der frühen Neuzeit’, in I. Richefort and B. Schmidt (eds.), Les relations entre la France et les villes Hanséatiques de Hambourg, Brême et Lübeck, Moyen ÂgeXIXe siècle (Brussels, 2006), pp.229–59; R. Postel, ‘Hamburg at the time of the Peace of Westphalia’, in K. Bussmann and H. Schilling (eds.),1648: War and Peace in Europe (3 vols., Münster, 1998), I, pp.337–43; U. Weiß, ‘“So were in puncto Jmmedietas civitatis das müglichste zu tun”. Die Erfurt-Frage auf dem Westfälischen Friedenskongreß’, in H. Duchhardt (ed.), Der Westfälische Friede (Munich, 1998), pp.541–64.

57. A. Krischer, ‘Das diplomatische Zeremoniell der Reichsstädte, oder: Was heißt Stadtfreiheit in der Fürstengesellschaft?’, HZ, 284 (2007), 1–30.

58. This argument is advanced in numerous works by Peter Blickle and summarized in ‘Communalism, parliamentarism, republicanism’, Parliaments, Estates and Representation, 6 (1986), 1–13.

59. R. von Friedeburg, ‘“Kommunalismus” und “Republikanismus” in der frühen Neuzeit?’, ZHF, 21 (1994), 65–91; H. Rebel, Peasant Classes (Princeton, 1983), pp.10–20.

60. F. Petri, ‘Zum Problem der herrschaftlichen und genossenschaftlichen Züge in der mittelalterlichen Marschensiedlung an der flämischen und niederländischen Nordseeküste’, in H. Beumann (ed.), Historische Forschungen für Walter Schlesinger (Cologne, 1974), pp.226–41.

61. W. L. Urban, Dithmarschen, a Medieval Peasant Republic (Lewiston, NY, 1991); B. Kümin, ‘Kirchgenossen an der Macht. Vormoderne politische Kultur in den “Pfarreirepubliken” von Gersau und Dithmarschen’, ZHF, 41 (2014), 187–230.

62. W. Lammers, Die Schlacht bei Hemmingstedt (Neum-nster, 1953).

63. G. Franz, Geschichte des deutschen Bauernstandes vom frühen Mittelalter bis zum 19. Jahrhundert (Stuttgart, 1970), pp.86–91. See ibid, pp.79–83, 94–5, for other small self-governing communities in the west of the Empire.

64. H. Wiemann, Die Grundlagen der landständischen Verfassung Ostfries-lands. Die Verträge von 1595 bis 1611 (Aurich, 1974).

65. B. Kappelhoff, Absolutisches Regiment oder Ständeherrschaft? Landesherr und Landstände in Ostfriesland im ersten Drittel des 18. Jahrhunderts (Hildesheim, 1982); M. Hughes, Law and Politics in 18th-Century Germany: The Imperial Aulic Council in the Reign of Charles VI (Woodbridge, 1988); R. Tieben, ‘Statebuilding with the participation of the Estates? East Frisia between territorial legislation and communalist ritual, 1611–1744’, in W. Blockmans et al. (eds.), Empowering Interactions: Political Cultures and the Emergence of the State in Europe, 1300–1900 (Farnham, 2009), pp.267–78.

66. The term ‘canton’ was only officially adopted in 1798 with the foundation of the Helvetic Republic, but will be used here for convenience in preference to the contemporary term ‘place’ (Ort). For the following see D. M. Luebke, His Majesty’s Rebels: Communities, Factions and Rural Revolt in the Black Forest, 1725–1745 (Ithaca, NY, 1997), esp. pp.19–20; P. Stadler, ‘Die Schweiz und das Reich in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in Press (ed.), Alternativen, pp.131–42.

67. For the debate on Swiss exceptionalism see J. Steinberg, Why Switzerland? (Cambridge, 1976).

68. R. Sablonier, Gründungszeit ohne Eidgenossen. Politik und Gesellschaft in der Innerschweiz um 1300 (Baden, 2008).

69. J. Berenger, A History of the Habsburg Empire, 1273–1700 (Harlow, 1994), pp.54–5. For the following see also A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411 (Vienna, 2004), pp.119–22.

70. R. C. Head, Early Modern Democracy in the Grisons: Social Order and Political Language in a Swiss Mountain Canton, 1470–1620 (Cambridge, 1995); A. Wendland, Der Nutzen der Pässe und die Gefährdung der Seelen. Spanien, Mailand und der Kampf ums Veltlin (1620–1641) (Zürich, 1995), pp.367–8. Rhetia included the Domleschg, Oberhalbstein, Bergell and Engadin valleys, plus the town and cathedral chapter of Chur. The Ten Parish League comprised Belfort, Davos, Klosters, Castels, Schiers, Schanfigg, Langwies, Churwalden, Maienfeld and Malans-Jenins.

71. W. Schaufelberger, Der alte Schweizer und sein Krieg (3rd ed., Frauenfeld, 1987).

72. T. A. Brady Jr, Turning Swiss: Cities and Empire, 1450–1550 (Cambridge, 1985), pp.57–69; Carl, Der Schwäbische Bund, pp.451–9.

73. W. A. B. Coolidge, ‘The Republic of Gersau’, EHR, 4 (1889), 481–515.

74. Population from K. von Greyerz, ‘Switzerland during the Thirty Years War’, in Bussmann and Schilling (eds.), 1648: War and Peace, I, pp.133–9 at 133. Seven cantons were Catholic: Uri, Schwyz, Unterwalden, Luzern, Fribourg, Solothurn and Zug. Six were Protestant: Zürich, Bern, Glarus, Basel, Schaffhausen and Appenzell.

75. R. C. Head, Jenatsch’s Axe: Social Boundaries, Identity and Myth in the Era of the Thirty Years’ War (Rochester, NY, 2008); Wendland, Der Nutzen der Pässe, 47–78, 101–26. For tensions generally: R. C. Head, ‘“Nit alss zwo Gmeinden, oder Partheyen, sonder ein Gmeind”. Kommunalismus zwischen den Konfessionen in Graubünden 1530–1620’, in B. Kümin (ed.), Landgemeinde und Kirche im Zeitalter der Konfessionen (Zürich, 2004), pp.21–57.

76. Brady, Turning Swiss, p.36.

77. L. Hugo, ‘Verzeichnis der freien Reichsdörfer in Deutschland’, Zeitschrift für Archivkunde, Diplomatik und Geschichte, 2 (1836), 446–76.

78. Köbler, Historisches Lexikon, pp.338, 567–8. The others were Sulzbach (near Frankfurt), Soden in the Taunus mountains, Gochsheim and Sennfeld, both near Schweinfurt in Franconia.

79. Overviews in P. Blickle, ‘Peasant revolts in the German empire in the late Middle Ages’, Social History, 4 (1979), 223–39; Whaley, Germany, I, pp.135–47.

80. P. Blickle, The Revolution of 1525 (2nd ed., Baltimore, 1985); G. Vogler, ‘Reichsvorstellungen im Umkreis des Bauernkrieges’, in Press (ed.), Alter-nativen, pp.23–42. The Twelve Articles are printed in T. Scott and B. Scribner (eds.), The German Peasants’ War: A History in Documents (Atlantic Highlands, NJ, 1991), pp.253–6.

81. M. Bensing and S. Hoyer, Der deutsche Bauernkrieg, 1524–26 (3rd ed., Berlin, 1975).

82. G. Franz, Der deutsche Bauernkrieg (Darmstadt, 1976), p.299; P. Blickle, Der Bauernjörg. Feldherr im Bauernkrieg (Munich, 2015), esp. pp.294–5.

83. For example, P. Blickle, Obedient Germans? A Rebuttal (Charlottesville, VA, 1997).

84. R. Po-chia Hsia, Social Discipline in the Reformation: Central Europe, 1550–1750 (London, 1989), pp.146–8; D. W. Sabean, Power in the Blood (Cambridge, 1984), pp.144–73. The judicial changes are discussed on pp.632–6.

85. For example, Luebke, His Majesty’s Rebels, pp.170, 174.

86. These eventually comprised the abbey and town of St Gallen, the imperial cities of Rottweil and Mulhouse, the community of Biel (Bienne), the county of Wallis (Valais), the principality of Neufchâtel, the bishopric of Basel, and Rhetia. The bishop of Sitten (Sion) was an associate between 1475 and 1628.

87. R. Hauswirth, Landgraf Philipp von Hessen und Zwingli (Tübingen, 1968); T. A. Brady Jr, The Politics of the Reformation in Germany: Jacob Sturm (1489–1553) of Strasbourg (Atlantic Highlands, NJ, 1997); Fabian, Die Entstehung des Schmalkaldischen Bundes, pp.30–31, 37–9, 211–16.

88. F. Gallati, ‘Eidgenössische Politik zur Zeit des Dreißigjährigen Krieges’, Jahrbuch für schweizerische Geschichte, 44 (1919), 1–257 at 3–4.

89. Useful works among the substantial literature on this topic include G. Parker, The Dutch Revolt (London, 1977); M. Prak, The Dutch Republic in the Seventeenth Century (Cambridge, 2005), and J. L. Price’s similarly titled book (Basingstoke, 1998). The republic’s relationship to the Empire is discussed on p.229.

90. The need for English aid obliged the Dutch to accept the incompetent Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester, as ‘governor general’ from 1585 to 1587. For Archduke Matthias’s involvement see B. Rill, Kaiser Matthias (Graz, 1999), pp.9–12, 32–40; J. I. Israel, The Dutch Republic (Oxford, 1995), pp.190–205.

91. H. H. Rowen, The Princes of Orange: The Stadholders in the Dutch Republic (Cambridge, 1988).

92. See the contributions by I. Auerbach, G. Schramm and H. G. Koenigsberger to R. J. W. Evans and T. V. Thomas (eds.), Crown, Church and Estates (Basingstoke, 1991), and the two articles by J. Pánek, ‘Das Ständewesen und die Gesellschaft in den Böhmischen Ländern in der Zeit vor der Schlacht auf dem Weissen Berg (1526–1620)’,Historica. Les sciences historiques en Tchécoslovaquie, 25 (1985), 73–120, and ‘Das politische System des böhmischen Staates im ersten Jahrhundert der habsburgischen Herrschaft (1526–1620)’, MIÖG, 97 (1989), 53–82.

93. T. Brockmann, Dynastie, Kaiseramt und Konfession (Paderborn, 2011), pp.39–43, 56–63.

94. J. I. Israel, Dutch Primacy in World Trade, 1585–1740 (Oxford, 1989); M. ’t Hart, The Dutch Wars of Independence: Warfare and Commerce in the Netherlands, 1570–1680 (London, 2014).

95. T. Winkelbauer, ‘Nervus belli Bohemici. Die finanziellen Hintergründe des Scheiterns des Ständeaufstands der Jahre 1618 bis 1620’, Folia Historica Bohemica, 18 (1997), 173–223; P. H. Wilson, Europe’s Tragedy: The Thirty Years War (London, 2009), pp.269–313.

96. English translation of the Confederation’s charter in P. H. Wilson, The Thirty Years War: A Sourcebook (Basingstoke, 2010), pp.41–6. Discussion in J. Bahlcke, ‘Modernization and state-building in an east-central European Estates’ system: The example of the Confoederatio Bohemica of 1619’, PER, 17 (1997), 61–73, and his ‘Die Böhmische Krone zwischen staatsrechtlicher Integrität, monarchischer Union und ständischem Föderalismus’, in T. Fröschl (ed.), Föderationsmodelle und Unionsstrukturen (Munich, 1994), pp.83–103. P. Mat’a voices greater scepticism towards claims for the Confederation’s innovations: ‘“Monarchia/monarchey/da einer allein herrschet”: The making of state power and reflections on the state in Bohemia and Moravia between the Estates’ rebellion and Enlightenment reforms’, in H. Manikowska and J. Pánek (eds.), Political Culture in Central Europe (10th20th Century), I, Middle Ages and Early Modern Era (Prague, 2005), pp.349–67.

97. Z. V. David, Finding the Middle Way: The Utraquists’ Liberal Challenge to Rome and Luther (Washington DC, 2003), esp. pp.302–48.

98. J. Burkhardt, Der Dreißigjährige Krieg (Frankfurt, 1992), pp.85–7; F. Müller, Kursachsen und der Böhmische Aufstand, 1618–1622 (Münster, 1997); J. Polišenský, Tragic Triangle: The Netherlands, Spain and Bohemia, 1617–1621 (Prague, 1991).

99. H. Smolinsky, ‘Formen und Motive konfessioneller Koexistenz in den Niederlanden und am Niederrhein’, in K. Garber et al (eds.), Erfahrung und Deutung von Krieg und Frieden (Munich, 2001), pp.287–300; A. D. Anderson, On the Verge of War: International Relations and the Jülich-Kleve Succession Crises (1609–1614) (Boston, MA, 1999); M. Groten et al. (eds.), Der Jülich-Klevische Erbstreit 1609 (Düsseldorf, 2011).

100. M. Kaiser, ‘Die vereinbarte Okkupation. Generalstaatische Besatzungen in brandenburgischen Festungen am Niederrhein’, in M. Meumann and J. Rögge (eds.), Die besetzte res publica (Münster, 2006), pp.271–314.

101. M. Kaiser and M. Rohrschneider (eds.), Membra unius capitis. Studien zu Herrschaftsauffassungen und Regierungspraxis in Kurbrandenburg (1640–1688) (Berlin, 2005); F. L. Carsten, Princes and Parliaments (Oxford, 1959), pp.258–340; L. Hüttl, Friedrich Wilhelm von Brandenburg (Munich, 1981), pp.171–84, 197–200.

102. W. Frijhoff and M. Spies, 1650: Hard-Won Unity (Basingstoke, 2004).

103. H. Dreitzel, Absolutismus und ständische Verfassung in Deutschland (Mainz, 1992), p.134. See generally idem, Monarchiebegriffe in der Fürstengesellschaft (2 vols., Cologne, 1991).

104. Dreitzel, Absolutismus, pp.92–100, 134–7.

105. H. Dippel, Germany and the American Revolution, 1770–1800 (Chapel Hill, NC, 1977); B. Stollberg-Rilinger, Vormünder des Volkes? Konzepte landständischer Repräsentation in der Spätphase des Alten Reiches (Berlin, 1999), pp.140–88; H. E. Bödeker, ‘The concept of the republic in eighteenth-century German thought’, in J. Heideking and J. A. Henretta (eds.), Republicanism and Liberalism in America and the German States, 1750–1850 (Cambridge, 2002), pp.35–52.

106. Dreitzel, Absolutismus, pp.104–20; Stollberg-Rilinger, Vormünder des Volkes?, pp.120–26.

107. A. Flügel, Bürgerliche Rittergüter. Sozialer Wandel und politische Reform in Kursachsen (1680–1844) (Göttingen, 2000), pp.178–209.

108. M. Wagner, ‘Der sächsische Bauernaufstand und die Französische Revolution in der Perzeption der Zeitgenossen’, in H. Berding (ed.), Soziale Unruhen in Deutschland während der Französischen Revolution (Göttingen, 1988), pp.149–65; H. Gabel and W. Schulze, ‘Peasant resistance and politicization in Germany in the eighteenth century’, in E. Hellmuth (ed.), The Transformation of Political Culture (Oxford, 1990), pp.119–46.

CHAPTER 12: JUSTICE

1. As noted by H. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft (Darmstadt, 2002), p.38.

2. P. Blickle, Das Alte Europa (Munich, 2008), pp.44–6.

3. M. Walker, ‘Rights and functions: The social categories of eighteenth-century German jurists and cameralists’, JMH, 50 (1978), 234–51; W. Schmale, ‘Das Heilige Römische Reich und die Herrschaft des Rechts’, in R. G. Asch and H. Duchhardt (eds.), Der Absolutismus – ein Mythos? (Cologne, 1996), pp.229–48 esp. 240–41. See also Goethe’s illuminating comments about the purpose of imperial justice in the light of his own experience as a legal intern: Collected Works, 12 vols., ed. T. P. Saine and J. L. Sammons (Princeton, 1987), IV: From my Life: Poetry and Truth, p.389.

4. R. McKitterick, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians (Harlow, 1983), pp.98–103; B. Arnold, Medieval Germany, 500–1300 (Basingstoke, 1997), pp.148–51, and his Princes and Territories in Medieval Germany (Cambridge, 1991), pp.30–32.

5. G. Franz, Geschichte des deutschen Bauernstandes vom frühen Mittelalter bis zum 19. Jahrhundert (Stuttgart, 1970), pp.57–60; H. K. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), I, pp.143–5.

6. W. Hartmann, ‘Autoritäten im Kirchenrecht und Autorität des Kirchenrechts in der Salierzeit’, in S. Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich (3 vols., Sigmaringen, 1991), III, pp.425–46.

7. Schulze, Grundstrukturen, I, pp.91–4. See also pp.359–60.

8. B. H. Hill Jr, Medieval Monarchy in Action (London, 1972), pp.213–14.

9. R. van Dülmen, Theatre of Horror: Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 1990), esp. p.132; E. Schubert, Fürstliche Herrschaft und Territorium im späten Mittelalter (2nd ed., Munich, 2006), p.89; Blickle, Das Alte Europa, pp.138–9, 225.

10. J. Q. Whitman, The Legacy of Roman Law in the German Romantic Era (Princeton, 1990), pp.4–28.

11. E. Ortlieb, Im Auftrag des Kaisers. Die kaiserlichen Kommissionen des Reichshofrats und die Regelung von Konflikten im Alten Reich (1637–1657) (Cologne, 2001), pp.366–8.

12. H. Weill, Frederick the Great and Samuel von Cocceji (Madison, WI, 1961); J. Whaley, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, 1493–1806 (2 vols., Oxford, 2012), II, pp.514–15.

13. H. E. Strakosch, State Absolutism and the Rule of Law (Sidney, 1967); F. A. J. Szabo, Kaunitz and Enlightened Absolutism, 1753–1780 (Cambridge, 1994), pp.180–85.

14. K. Härter, ‘The early modern Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation (1495–1806): A multi-layered legal system’, in J. Duindam et al. (eds.), Law and Empire (Leiden, 2013), pp.111–31.

15. Hill, Medieval Monarchy in Action, pp.166–8. For the following see ibid, pp.180–83, and more generally G. Althoff, Spielregeln der Politik im Mittelalter: Kommunikation in Frieden und Fehde (Darmstadt, 1997), pp.21–98.

16. A. Krah, Absetzungsverfahren als Spiegelbild von Königsmacht (Aalen, 1987), pp.58–60.

17. Arnold, Medieval Germany, pp.47–8.

18. E. J. Goldberg, Struggle for Empire: Kingship and Conflict under Louis the German, 817–876 (Ithaca, NY, 2006), p.229; H. Wolfram, Conrad II, 990–1039 (University Park, PA, 2006), pp.185–6, 189–90, 333–405; Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft, p.46.

19. Ibid, pp.38–40; G. Althoff, Die Ottonen (2nd ed., Stuttgart, 2005), pp. 104–6, and his Spielregeln, pp.53, 294.

20. T. Reuter, Germany in the Early Middle Ages, c.800–1056 (Harlow, 1991), pp.214–16.

21. M. Becher, Otto der Große (Munich, 2012), pp.163–85.

22. Goldberg, Struggle for Empire, pp.229–30.

23. Krah, Absetzungsverfahren, pp.379–401.

24. Althoff, Spielregeln, pp.116–20.

25. J. Barrow, ‘Playing by the rules: Conflict management in tenth-and eleventh-century Germany’, EME, 11 (2002), 389–96 at 392.

26. Keller, Ottonische Königsherrschaft, pp.49–50.

27. G. Althoff, Die Macht der Rituale: Symbolik und Herrschaft im Mittelalter (Darmstadt, 2003), p.136. Henry’s own supplication before Gregory VII is discussed on p.58. For the following see also T. Reuter, ‘Unruhestiftung, Fehde, Rebellion, Widerstand. Gewalt und Frieden in der Politik der Salierzeit’, in Weinfurter (ed.), Die Salier und das Reich, III, pp.297–325.

28. G. Althoff, ‘Kaiser Heinrich VI’, in W. Hechberger and F. Schuller (eds.), Staufer & Welfen (Regensburg, 2009), pp.143–55; W. Stürner, Friedrich II. (2 vols., Darmstadt, 2009), II, pp.9–75, 189–210.

29. S. Weinfurter, The Salian Century (Philadelphia, 1999), pp.72, 81.

30. T. Head, ‘The development of the Peace of God in Aquitaine (970–1005)’, Speculum, 74 (1999), 656–86; H. E. J. Cowdrey, ‘The Peace and Truce of God in the eleventh century’, P&P, 46 (1970), 42–67.

31. E. Boshof, Königtum und Königsherrschaft im 10. und 11. Jahrhundert (3rd ed., Munich, 2010), pp.112–13; K. Schnith, ‘Recht und Friede. Zum Königsgedanken im Umkreis Heinrichs III.’, HJb, 81 (1961), 22–57; Weinfurter, Salian Century, pp.98–104.

32. The 1152 and 1235 measures are printed in K. Zeumer (ed.), Quellensammlung zur Geschichte der deutschen Reichsverfassung in Mittelalter und Neuzeit (Tübingen, 1913), pp.7–8, 68–77. Further discussion in Arnold, Medieval Germany, pp.151–7, 184–91; Stürner, Friedrich II., II, pp.313–16.

33. H. Vollrath, ‘Ideal and reality in twelfth-century Germany’, in A. Haverkamp and H. Vollrath (eds.), England and Germany in the High Middle Ages (Oxford, 1996), pp.93–104; B. Weiler, ‘Reasserting power: Frederick II in Germany (1235–1236)’, in idem and S. MacLean (eds.), Representations of Power in Medieval Germany, 800–1500(Turnhout, 2006), pp.241–72 esp. 247–9, 258–61.

34. E. Boshof, Die Salier (5th ed., Stuttgart, 2008), p.260; Arnold, Princes and Territories, pp.44–5.

35. B. Diestelkamp, ‘König und Städte in salischer und staufischer Zeit’, in F. Vittinghoff (ed.), Stadt und Herrschaft (Munich, 1982), pp.247–97 at 278–81.

36. T. Reuter, ‘The medieval German Sonderweg ? The Empire and its rulers in the high Middle Ages’, in A. J. Duggan (eds.), Kings and Kingship in Medieval Europe (London, 1993), pp.179–211 at 190–94.

37. J. J. Schmauss and H. C. von Senckenberg (eds.), Neue und vollständige Sammlung der Reichsabschiede (4 vols., Frankfurt am Main, 1747), I, pp. 30–31; B. Weiler, ‘Image and reality in Richard of Cornwall’s German career’, EHR, 113 (1998), 1111–42 at 1120–21.

38. H. Carl, Der Schwäbische Bund, 1488–1534 (Leinfelden-Echterdingen, 2000), pp.33–4, 365–6.

39. F. R. H. Du Boulay, Germany in the Later Middle Ages (London, 1983), pp.83–90.

40. W. Troßbach and C. Zimmermann, Die Geschichte des Dorfs. Von den Anfängen im Frankenreich zur bundesdeutschen Gegenwart (Stuttgart, 2006), pp.86–9.

41. Schubert, Fürstliche Herrschaft, pp.67–70; Arnold, Princes and Territories, pp.186–210; Blickle, Das Alte Europa, pp.226–7. For this process in the Habsburg lands see A. Niederstätter, Österreichische Geschichte, 1278–1411 (Vienna, 2004), pp.326–33.

42. E. Lacour, ‘Faces of violence revisited: A typology of violence in early modern rural Germany’, Journal of Social History, 34 (2001), 649–67.

43. S. Reynolds, Kingdoms and Communities in Western Europe, 900–1300 (2nd ed., Oxford, 1997), pp.56–7; Schulze, Grundstrukturen, II, pp.168–9; Whitman, The Legacy of Roman Law, pp.35–7.

44. M. Prietzel, Das Heilige Römische Reich im Spätmittelalter (2nd ed., Darmstadt, 2010), p.15.

45. F. R. H. Du Boulay, ‘Law enforcement in medieval Germany’, History, 63 (1978), 345–55.

46. E. Schubert, ‘Die Harzgrafen im ausgehenden Mittelalter’, in J. Rogge and U. Schirmer (eds.), Hochadelige Herrschaft im mitteldeutschen Raum (1200 bis 1600) (Leipzig, 2003), pp.13–115.

47. Carl, Der Schwäbische Bund, pp.403–4.

48. B. Diestelkamp, Rechtsfälle aus dem Alten Reich (Munich, 1995), pp.11–12; R. Seyboth, ‘Kaiser, König, Stände und Städte im Ringen um das Kammergericht 1486–1495’, in B. Diestelkamp (ed.), Das Reichskammergericht in der deutschen Geschichte (Cologne, 1990), pp.5–23.

49. K. S. Bader, ‘Approaches to imperial reform at the end of the fifteenth century’, in G. Strauss (ed.), Pre-Reformation Germany (London, 1972), pp.136–61 at 148–50. The extensive literature is reviewed in R.-P. Fuchs, ‘The supreme court of the Holy Roman Empire’, The Sixteenth-Century Journal, 34 (2003), 9–27; E. Ortlieb and S. Westphal, ‘Die Höchstgerichtsbarkeit im Alten Reich’, ZSRG GA, 123 (2006), 291–304.

50. G. Schmidt-von Rhein, ‘Das Reichskammergericht in Wetzlar’, NA, 100 (1989), 127–40.

51. S. Jahns, Die Assessoren des Reichskammergerichts in Wetzlar (Wetzlar, 1986); B. Ruthmann, ‘Das richterliche Personal am Reichskammergericht und seine politischen Verbindungen um 1600’, in W. Sellert (ed.), Reichshofrat und Reichskammergericht (Cologne, 1999), pp.1–26. The court also had its own secretariat and archive.

52. J. Weitzel, ‘Zur Zuständigkeit des Reichskammergerichts als Appellationsgericht’, ZSRG GA, 90 (1973), 213–45; K. Perels, ‘Die Justizverweigerung im alten Reiche seit 1495’, ZSRG GA, 25 (1904), 1–51; H. Gabel, ‘Beobachtungen zur Territorialen Inanspruchnahme des Reichskammergerichts im Bereich des Niederrheinisch-Westfälischen Kreises’, in Diestelkamp (ed.), Das Reichskammergericht, pp.143–72 esp. 154–62; S. Westphal, Ehen vor Gericht – Scheidungen und ihre Folgen am Reichskammergericht (Wetzlar, 2008).

53. A. Wiffels, ‘Der Große Rat von Mechelen’, in I. Scheurmann (ed.), Frieden durch Recht. Das Reichskammergericht von 1495 bis 1806 (Mainz, 1994), pp.374–82; F. Hertz, ‘Die Rechtsprechung der höchsten Reichsgerichte im römisch-deutschen Reich und ihre politische Bedeutung’, MIÖG, 69 (1961), 331–58 at 348.

54. S. Ullmann, Geschichte auf der langen Bank. Die Kommissionen des Reichshofrats unter Kaiser Maximilian II. (1564–1576) (Mainz, 2006); S. Ehrenpreis, Kaiserliche Gerichtsbarkeit und Konfessionskonflikt. Der Reichshofrat unter Rudolf II., 1576–1612 (Göttingen, 2006); L. Auer, ‘The role of the Imperial Aulic Council in the constitutional structure of the Holy Roman Empire’, in R. J. W. Evans et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Oxford, 2011), pp.63–76.

55. W. Behringer, Witches and Witch-Hunts: A Global History (Cambridge, MA, 2004); B. Gehm, Die Hexenverfolgung im Hochstift Bamberg und das Eingreifen des Reichshofrates zu ihrer Beendigung (Hildesheim, 2000); W. Sellert and P. Oestmann, ‘Hexen- und Strafprozesse am Reichskammergericht’, in Scheurmann (ed.), Frieden durch Recht, pp.328–35.

56. S. Westphal, ‘Der Umgang mit kultureller Differenz am Beispiel von Haftbedingungen für Juden in der Frühen Neuzeit’, in A. Gotzmann and S. Wendehorst (eds.), Juden im Recht. Neue Zugänge zur Rechtsgeschichte der Juden im Alten Reich (Berlin, 2007), 139–61 at 152–4.

57. W. Sellert, ‘Das Verhältnis von Reichskammergerichts- und Reichshofratsordnungen am Beispiel der Regelungen über die Visitation’, in Diestelkamp (ed.), Das Reichskammergericht, pp.111–28; K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, ‘Kaiser Joseph II. und die Reichskammergerichtsvisitation 1766–1776’, ZNRG, 13 (1991), 129–44. The religious cases are discussed on p.123.

58. R. Smend, Das Reichskammergericht (Weimar, 1911), pp.230–31; E. Ortlieb and G. Polster, ‘Die Prozessfrequenz am Reichshofrat (1519–1806)’, ZNRG, 26 (2004), 189–216.

59. As reported by BBC News on 19 April 2012. Further statistics in Diestelkamp, Rechtsfälle, pp.31–6; Whaley, Germany, II, pp.414, 432.

60. Ortlieb, Im Auftrag, pp.99–114; M. Fimpel, Reichsjustiz und Territorialstaat (Tübingen, 1999), pp.35, 54, 57, 293.

61. S. Westphal, Kaiserliche Rechtsprechung und herrschaftliche Stabilisierung (Cologne, 2002), pp.32–52; G. Benecke, Society and Politics in Germany, 1500–1750 (London, 1974), p.277; Ortlieb, Im Auftrag, pp. 90–97; B. Stollberg-Rilinger, ‘Rang vor Gericht. Zur Verrechtlichung sozialer Rangkonflikte in der frühen Neuzeit’, ZHF, 28 (2001), 385–418.

62. C. Kampmann, Reichsrebellion und kaiserliche Acht. Politische Strafjustiz im Dreißigjährigen Krieg und das Verfahren gegen Wallenstein 1634 (Münster, 1992), and his ‘Zur Entstehung der Konkurrenz zwischen Kaiserhof und Reichstag beim Achtverfahren’, in Sellert (ed.), Reichshofrat, pp.169–98.

63. K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, 1648–1806 (4 vols., Stuttgart, 1993–2000), III, pp.92–3; A. G. W. Kohlhepp, Die Militärverfassung des deutschen Reiches zur Zeit des Siebenjährigen Krieges (Greifswald, 1914), pp.58, 62–4.

64. D. Landes, Achtverfahren vor dem Reichshofrat (Frankfurt am Main, 1964).

65. W. Troßbach, ‘Power and good governance: The removal of ruling princes in the Holy Roman Empire, 1680–1794’, in J. P. Coy et al. (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, Reconsidered (New York, 2010), pp.191–209, and his ‘Fürstenabsetzungen im 18. Jahrhundert’, ZHF, 13 (1986), 425–54.

66. See especially the works of W. Schulze, Bäuerlicher Widerstand und feudale Herrschaft in der frühen Neuzeit (Stuttgart, 1980), pp.73–85, ‘Die veränderte Bedeutung sozialer Konflikte im 16. und 17. Jahrhundert’, in H.-U. Wehler (ed.), Der Deutsche Bauernkrieg, 1524–1526 (Göttingen, 1975), pp.277–302, ‘Peasant resistance in sixteenth-and seventeenth-century Germany in a European context’, in K. von Greyerz, Religion, Politics and Social Protest (London, 1984), pp.61–98.

67. P. H. Wilson, War, State and Society in Württemberg, 1677–1793 (Cambridge, 1995), pp.229–31; P. Milton, ‘Intervening against tyrannical rule in the Holy Roman Empire during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries’, GH, 33 (2015), 1–29; Fimpel, Reichsjustiz, pp.245–6, and the works in n.65 above.

68. R. Sailer, Untertanenprozesse vor dem Reichskammergericht. Rechtsschutz gegen die Obrigkeit in der Zweiten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts (Cologne, 1999), pp.468–73.

69. W. Troßbach, ‘Bauernbewegungen in deutschen Kleinterritorien zwischen 1648 und 1789’, in W. Schulze (ed.), Aufstände, Revolten, Prozesse (Stuttgart, 1983), pp.233–60; C. R. Friedrichs, ‘German town revolts and the seventeenth-century crisis’, Renaissance and Modern Studies, 26 (1982), 27–51; NTSR, XVIII, 421–68.

70. A. Suter, ‘Troublen’ im Fürstbistum Basel (1726–1740) (Göttingen, 1985).

71. As argued by H.-U. Wehler, Deutsche Gesellschaftsgeschichte (5 vols., Munich, 2008), I, passim, and II, p.297.

72. J. Barth, Hohenzollernsche Chronik oder Geschichte und Sage der hohen-zollernschen Lande (Sigmaringen, 1863), pp.532–6; J. Cramer, Die Grafschaft Hohenzollern (Stuttgart, 1873), pp.257–412; V. Press, ‘Von den Bauernrevolten des 16. zur konstitutionellen Verfassung des 19. Jahrhunderts. Die Untertanenkonflikte in Hohenzollern-Hechingen und ihre Lösungen’, in H. Weber (ed.), Politische Ordnungen und soziale Kräfte im Alten Reich (Wiesbaden, 1980), pp.85–112.

73. Auer, ‘Imperial Aulic Council’, pp.73–4.

74. D. M. Luebke, His Majesty’s Rebels: Communities, Factions and Rural Revolt in the Black Forest, 1725–1745 (Ithaca, NY, 1997); H. Rebel, Peasant Classes (Princeton, 1983), pp.199–229; T. Robisheaux, Rural Society and the Search for Order in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 1989), pp.175–98.

75. H. Gabel, Widerstand und Kooperation. Studien zur politischen Kultur rheinischer und maasländischer Kleinterritorien (1648–1794) (Tübingen, 1995); Benecke, Society and Politics, pp.276–8.

76. N. Schindler, Rebellion, Community and Custom in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 2002), pp.35–7. For the following also U. Rublack, ‘State-formation, gender and the experience of governance in early modern Württemberg’, in idem (ed.), Gender in Early Modern German History (Cambridge, 2002), pp.200–217; W. Troßbach, ‘Widerstand als Normal-fall. Bauernunruhen in der Grafschaft Sayn-Wittgenstein-Wittgenstein 1696–1806’, WZ, 135 (1985), 25–111 at 88–90.

77. Sailer, Untertanenprozesse, p.466.

78. K. Härter, ‘Die Sicherheit des Rechts und die Produktion von Sicherheit im frühneuzeitlichen Strafrecht’, in C. Kampmann and U. Niggemann (eds.), Sicherheit in der Frühen Neuzeit (Cologne, 2013), pp.661–72.

79. Haas’s memorandum is in HHStA, Titel und Wappen, Kart.3, Mappe 1, and printed in G. Walter, Der Zusammenbruch des Heiligen Römischen Reichs deutscher Nation und die Problematik seiner Restauration in den Jahren 1814/15 (Heidelberg, 1980), pp.132–44. For the widespread belief that ordinary folk would suffer if the Empire was reorganized as a unitary state, see K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Heiliges Römisches Reich, 1776–1806 (2 vols., Wiesbaden, 1967), I, pp.362–71.

80. J. Viscount Bryce, The Holy Roman Empire (5th ed., London, 1919), p.402.

81. Quoted in B. Stollberg-Rilinger, Des Kaisers alte Kleider (Munich, 2008), p.252.

82. Ibid, p.257; K. Härter, Reichstag und Revolution, 1789–1806 (Göttingen, 1992), pp.653–68.

83. Quotations from S. Jahns, ‘Die Personalverfassung des Reichskammergerichts unter Anpassungsdruck’, in Diestelkamp (ed.), Das Reichskammergericht, pp.59–109 at 59; D. Beales, Joseph II (2 vols., Cambridge, 1987–2009), I, p.126. Further comments in similar vein in C. Hattenhauer, Wahl und Krönung Franz II. AD 1792 (Frankfurt am Main, 1995), pp.401–19; Stollberg-Rilinger, Kaisers alte Kleider, pp.274–80.

84. M. Walker, Johann Jakob Moser and the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation (Chapel Hill, NC, 1981), pp.290–95, 301. For a more upbeat assessment of Moser’s views see R. Rürup, Johann Jacob Moser. Pietismus und Reform (Wiesbaden, 1965), pp.141–52.

85. J. H. Zedler, Große vollständige Universal-Lexicon aller Wissenschaften und Künste, vol.43 (Leipzig, 1745).

86. E.g. G. Kleinheyer, ‘Die Abdankung des Kaisers’, in G. Köbler (ed.), Wege europäischer Rechtsgeschichte (Frankfurt am Main, 1987), pp.124–44 at 144. Goethe’s mother quoted in H. Neuhaus, ‘Das Ende des Alten Reiches’, in H. Altricher and H. Neuhaus (eds.), Das Ende von Großreichen (Erlangen, 1996), pp.185–209 at 191.

87. J. G. Gagliardo, Reich and Nation: The Holy Roman Empire as Idea and Reality, 1763–1806 (Bloomington, IN, 1980), pp.99–102.

88. K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, ‘Die Reichsidee um 1800’, in F. Bosbach and H. Hiery (eds.), Imperium / Empire / Reich (Munich, 1999), pp.109–11; W. Burgdorf, Reichskonstitution und Nation. Verfassungsreformprojekte für das Heilige Römische Reich deutscher Nation im politischen Schrifttum von 1648 bis 1806 (Mainz, 1998), and his ‘Imperial reform and visions of a European constitution in Germany around 1800’, History of European Ideas, 19 (1994), 401–8. See also pp.277–80.

89. A. Gotthard, Das Alte Reich, 1495–1806 (3rd ed., Darmstadt, 2006), pp. 149–50; G. W. F. Hegel’s German Constitution (1802), in T. M. Knox (ed.), Hegel’s Political Writings (Oxford, 1969), pp.143–242.

90. M. Umbach, Federalism and Enlightenment in Germany, 1740–1806 (London, 2000), pp.167–84; P. Burg, Die deutsche Trias in Idee und Wirklichkeit. Vom Alten Reich zum deutschen Zollverein (Stuttgart, 1989), pp.9–12; A. Kohler, ‘Das Reich im Spannungsfeld des preussisch-österreichischen Gegensatzes. Die Fürstenbundbestrebungen, 1783–1785’, in F. Engel-Janosi et al. (eds.), Fürst, Bürger, Mensch (Munich, 1975), pp.71–96; D. Stievermann, ‘Der Fürstenbund von 1785 und das Reich’, in V. Press (ed.), Alternativen zur Reichsverfassung in der Frühen Neuzeit? (Munich, 1995), pp.209–26; A. Hanschmidt, Franz von Fürstenberg als Staatsmann(Münster, 1969), pp.186–249.

91. E. Hirsch, Die Dessau-Wörlitzer Reformbewegung im Zeitalter der Aufklärung (Tübingen, 2003); M. Umbach, ‘The politics of sentimentality and the German Fürstenbund, 1779–1785’, HJ, 41 (1998), 679–704, and her ‘Visual culture, scientific images and German small-state politics in the late Enlightenment’, P&P, 158 (1998), 110–45.

92. Landesarchiv Münster, A267 Nos.2557–61, insurance scheme registers; T. C. W. Blanning, Reform and Revolution in Mainz, 1743–1803 (Cambridge, 1974), pp.188–90.

93. E.g. by Umbach, Federalism, pp.161–2.

94. K. Härter, ‘Reichsrecht und Reichsverfassung in der Auflösungsphase des Heiligen Römischen Reichs deutscher Nation’, ZNRG, 28 (2006), 316–37 at 326; K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, Das Reich (Stuttgart, 1986), p.393.

95. D. Petschel, Sächsische Außenpolitik unter Friedrich August I. (Cologne, 2000), pp.56–91; J. B. Knudsen, Justus Möser and the German Enlightenment (Cambridge, 1986).

96. T. Hartwig, Der Überfall der Grafschaft Schaumburg-Lippe durch Landgraf Wilhelm IX. von Hessen-Kassel (Hanover, 1911).

97. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, III, pp.354–61; W. Lüdke, ‘Der Kampf zwischen Oesterreich und Preussen um die Vorherrschaft im “Reiche” und die Auflösung des Fürstenbundes (1789/91)’, MIÖG, 45 (1931), 70–153.

98. W. Burgdorf, Ein Weltbild verliert seine Welt. Der Untergang des Alten Reiches und die Generation 1806 (2nd ed., Munich, 2009), p.33.

99. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, III, pp.417–36, and his Heiliges Römisches Reich, I, pp.303–7, 317–18, 368–70.

100. Quoted in Neuhaus, ‘Das Ende’, p.200. Statistics from Sailer, Untertanenprozesse, p.17.

101. Quote from G. Schmidt, Geschichte des Alten Reiches (Munich, 1999), p.333. On Prussian fears of revolution see G. Birtsch, ‘Revolutionsfurcht in Preußen 1789 bis 1794’, in O. Büsch and M. Neugebauer-Wölk (eds.), Preußen und die revolutionäre Herausforderung seit 1789 (Berlin, 1991), pp.87–101; L. Kittstein, Politik im Zeitalter der Revolution. Untersuchungen zur preußischen Staatlichkeit, 1792–1807 (Stuttgart, 2003), pp.32–42. For the level and character of protest see H. Berding (ed.), Soziale Unruhen in Deutschland während der Französischen Revolution (Göttingen, 1988).

102. Wehler, Deutsche Gesellschaftsgeschichte, I, pp.356–7. The literature on the German Jacobins is summarized in Whaley, Germany, II, pp.583–91.

103. H. Schultz, ‘Mythos und Aufklärung. Frühformen des Nationalismus in Deutschland’, HZ, 263 (1996), 31–67; Schmidt, Geschichte, pp.333–40.

104. T. C. W. Blanning, The French Revolution in Germany: Occupation and Resistance in the Rhineland, 1792–1802 (Oxford, 1983); M. Rowe, From Reich to State: The Rhineland in the Revolutionary Age, 1780–1830 (Cambridge, 2003); Kittstein, Politik, pp.43–7, 57–64.

105. K. Härter, ‘Der Reichstag im Revolutionsjahr 1789’, in K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin and K. Härter (eds.), Revolution und konservatives Beharren (Mainz, 1990), pp.155–74.

106. R. Blaufarb, ‘Napoleon and the abolition of feudalism’, in A. Forrest and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Bee and the Eagle: Napoleonic France and the End of the Holy Roman Empire, 1806 (Basingstoke, 2009), pp.131–54.

107. S. S. Biro, The German Policy of Revolutionary France: A Study in French Diplomacy during the War of the First Coalition, 1792–1797 (2 vols., Cambridge, MA, 1957); T. C. W. Blanning, The Origins of the French Revolutionary Wars (Harlow, 1986).

108. C. Jany, Geschichte der Preußischen Armee (4 vols., Osnabrück, 1967), III, pp.252–9.

109. H. M. Scott, The Birth of a Great Power System, 1740–1815 (Harlow, 2006), pp.202–13, 244–60; P. H. Wilson, German Armies: War and German Politics, 1648–1806 (London, 1998), pp.303–30.

110. B. Simms, The Impact of Napoleon: Prussian High Politics, Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Executive, 1797–1806 (Cambridge, 1997); Kittstein, Politik, pp.365–408.

111. H. Angermeier, ‘Deutschland zwischen Reichstradition und Nationalstaat. Verfassungspolitische Konzeptionen und nationales Denken zwischen 1801 und 1815’, ZSRG GA, 107 (1990), 19–101 at 53–4; Aretin, Das Alte Reich, III, pp.515–16.

112. Aretin, Heilige Römisches Reich, I, p.365.

113. W. Real, ‘Die preußischen Staatsfinanzen und die Anbahnung des Sonder-friedens von Basel 1795’, Forschungen zur Brandenburgischen und Preußischen Geschichte, 1 (1991), 53–100; P. G. Dwyer, ‘The politics of Prussian neutrality, 1795–1805’, GH, 12 (1994), 351–73.

114. Aretin, Heilige Römisches Reich, I, pp.365–6; Kittstein, Politik, pp.95–8.

115. D. E. Showalter, ‘Hubertusberg to Auerstädt: The Prussian army in decline?’, GH, 12 (1994), 308–33 at 324.

116. Kittstein, Politik, pp.119–38, 294–309.

117. Central to this critique was the anachronistic charge that Austria failed to exploit France’s weakness in 1789 to recover Alsace and Lorraine as ‘German’ territory. E.g. V. Bibl, Der Zerfall Österreichs (2 vols., Vienna, 1922–4).

118. K. A. Roider Jr, Baron Thurgut and Austria’s Response to the French Revolution (Princeton, 1987); H. Rössler, Graf Johann Philipp Stadion. Napoleons deutscher Gegenspieler (2 vols., Vienna, 1966); U. Dorda, Johann Aloys Joseph Reichsfreiherr von Hýgel (1754–1825) (Würzburg, 1969).

119. Quoted in Aretin, Heiliges Römisches Reich, II, pp.250–55.

120. P. H. Wilson, ‘German military preparedness at the eve of the Revolutionary Wars’, in F. C. Schneid (ed.), The Consortium on Revolutionary Europe, 1750–1850: Selected Papers, 2004 (High Point, NC, 2008), pp. 16–30; Härter, Reichstag, p.399. Britain briefly subsidized another 62,400 Prussians in 1794.

121. M. Hochedlinger, Austria’s Wars of Emergence, 1683–1797 (Harlow, 2003), pp.285, 425.

122. Gagliardo, Reich and Nation, pp.144–8, 166–70; Kittstein, Politik, pp.65–87.

123. Hertz, ‘Die Rechtsprechung’, pp.347–8; K. O. Frhr. v. Aretin, ‘Das Reich und Napoleon’, in W. D. Gruner and J. Müller (eds.), Über Frankreich nach Europa (Hamburg, 1996), pp.183–200 at 189.

124. W. D. Gruner, ‘Österreich zwischen Altem Reich und Deutschem Bund (1789–1816)’, in W. Brauneder and L. Höbelt (eds.), Sacrum Imperium (Vienna, 1996), pp.319–60 at 333.

125. K. Härter, ‘Der Hauptschluß der außerordentlichen Reichsdeputation vom 25. Februar 1803’, GWU, 54 (2003), 484–500; Walter, Der Zusammenbruch, pp.7–8. Events summarized by Aretin, Das Alte Reich, III, pp.489–98. The Reichsdeputationshauptschluß, is printed in Zeumer (ed.), Quellensammlung, pp.509–28.

126. D. Schäfer, Ferdinand von Österreich. Großherzog zu Würzburg, Kurfürst von Salzburg, Großherzog der Toskana (Cologne, 1988).

127. C. W. Ingrao, The Habsburg Monarchy, 1618–1815 (2nd ed., Cambridge, 2000), p.228. See also H. Gross, ‘The Holy Roman Empire in modern times’, J. A. Vann and S. W. Rowan (eds.), The Old Reich (Brussels, 1974), pp.1–29 at 4–5.

128. Aretin, Das Alte Reich, III, p.503; Angermeier, ‘Deutschland’, 35–7.

129. D. Hohrath et al. (eds.), Das Ende reichsstädtischer Freiheit, 1802 (Ulm, 2002).

130. For examples of how these arrangements were implemented, see the contributions by E. Klueting and R. Haas in T. Schilp (ed.), Reform – Reformation – Säkularisation (Essen, 2004).

131. O. F. Winter, ‘Österreichische Pläne zur Neuformierung des Reichstages 1801–1806’, MÖSA, 15 (1962), 261–335.

132. Aretin, Das Reich, pp.48–9. For the unions see E. Kell, ‘Die Frankfurter Union (1803–1806)’, ZHF, 18 (1991), 71–97.

133. HHStA, Staatskanzlei Vorträge 167; Dorda, Reichsfreiherr von Hýgel, pp.173–5.

134. F. C. Schneid, Napoleon’s Conquest of Europe: The War of the Third Coalition (Westport, CT, 2005), p.141. In return, Prussia ceded Ansbach-Bayreuth to Bavaria and Cleves to Napoleon. Bavaria also surrendered Berg, which was combined with Cleves as a new German satellite state allied to France.

135. Bavaria was allowed to annex the imperial city of Augsburg, and it received the Tirol, Vorarlberg, Trent and Brixen from Austria, which in turn was permitted to incorporate Salzburg. Francis’s younger brother was given Würzburg by Bavaria, but French pressure delayed this part of the treaty. Austria was allowed to annex Venice in return for recognizing the new Italian kingdom. All three newly minted German sovereigns were obliged to marry into the Bonaparte family.

136. H. Ritter v. Srbik, Das Österreichische Kaisertum und das Ende des Heiligen Römischen Reiches, 1804–1806 (Berlin, 1927), pp.40–41. Attitudes to the imperial title at this point are discussed further on pp.159–63.

137. Fesch was the son of Napoleon’s grandmother by her second marriage to a Swiss officer. See K. Rob, Karl Theodor von Dalberg (1744–1817). Eine politische Biographie für die Jahre 1744–1806 (Frankfurt am Main, 1984), pp.408–9.

138. M. Kaiser, ‘A matter of survival: Bavaria becomes a kingdom’, in Forrest and Wilson (eds.), The Bee and the Eagle, pp.94–111; Walter, Der Zusammenbruch, pp.19, 23–4.

139. Napoleon to Tallyrand, 31 May 1806, Correspondance de Napoléon Ier, publiée par ordre de l’Empereur Napoléon III (32 vols., Paris, 1858–70), XII, p.509.

140. Johann Philipp Stadion deliberately did not pass on Francis’s request during his brief negotiations with France. Further discussion in P. H. Wilson, ‘Bolstering the prestige of the Habsburgs: The end of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806’, International History Review, 28 (2006), 709–36; G. Mraz, Österreich und das Reich, 1804–1806(Vienna, 1993).

141. Printed in Zeumer (ed.), Quellensammlung, pp.532–6. The others were Nassau-Usingen, Nassau-Weilburg, Hohenzollern-Hechingen, Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, Salm-Salm, Salm-Kyrburg, Arenberg, Liechtenstein and von der Leyen.

142. Details in HHStA, Titel und Wappen, Kart.3; Rössler, Stadion, I, pp.225–55.

CHAPTER 13: AFTERLIFE

1. For example, T. Nipperdey, Deutsche Geschichte, 1800–1918 (3 vols., Munich, 1983–92), I, p.14; J. Viscount Bryce, The Holy Roman Empire (5th ed., London, 1919), p.410; K. Epstein, The Genesis of German Conservatism (Princeton, 1966), pp.665–9.

2. H. Angermeier, ‘Deutschland zwischen Reichstradition und Nationalstaat. Verfassungspolitische Konzeptionen und nationales Denken zwischen 1801 und 1815’, ZSRG GA, 107 (1990), 19–101 at 20–21; W. Burgdorf, Ein Weltbild verliert seine Welt. Der Untergang des Alten Reiches und die Generation 1806 (2nd ed., Munich, 2009), pp.203–4. See generally idem, ‘“Once we were Trojans!” Contemporary reactions to the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation’, in R. J. W. Evans and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Leiden, 2012), pp.51–76.

3. H. Ritte v. Srbik, Das Österreichische Kaisertum und das Ende des Heiligen Römischen Reiches, 1804–1806 (Berlin, 1927), p.67. See also Haas’s opinions discussed on pp.636–7.

4. HHStA, Titel und Wappen, Kart.3 (Haas’s and Fahrenberg’s reports Aug. 1806); Prinzipalkommission Berichte, Fasz.182d (Hýgel’s report).

5. HHStA, Titel und Wappen, Kart.3 (Baron von Wessenberg’s report 18 Aug. 1806).

6. G. Menzel, ‘Franz Joseph von Albini, 1748–1816’, Mainzer Zeitschrift, 69 (1974), 1–126 at 108; H. Rössler, Napoleons Griff nach der Karlskrone. Das Ende des Alten Reiches, 1806 (Munich, 1957), p.65.

7. Palm has been anachronistically claimed as the first martyr in ‘the cause of German nationalism’: H. A. Winkler, Germany: The Long Road West (2 vols., Oxford, 2006–7), I, p.48.

8. Rössler, Napoleons Griff, pp.55–6; Burgdorf, Weltbild, pp.155–65.

9. Nipperdey, Deutsche Geschichte, I, p.14. See also W. Reinhard, ‘Frühmoderner Staat und deutsches Monstrum’, ZHF, 29 (2002), 339–57.

10. G. Walter, Der Zusammenbruch des Heiligen Römischen Reichs deutscher Nation und die Problematik seiner Restauration in den Jahren 1814/15 (Heidelberg, 1980), pp.75–6. Austrian arguments can be followed in HHStA, Titel und Wappen, Kart.3, Gutachten zur Abdankungsfrage, esp. memorandum of 31 July 1806. A self-styled Prince Karl Friedrich Philipp von Wettinberg, living in Teddington, paid £4,000 for a full-page advertisement in the Independent newspaper on 24 Sept. 1999 to proclaim himself Emperor Charles VIII on the basis that the Empire had not been legally dissolved.

11. Walter, Zusammenbruch, pp.26–42, 76–95, 129. Sweden’s protest is in HHStA, Titel und Wappen, Kart.3.

12. L. Kittstein, Politik im Zeitalter der Revolution (Stuttgart, 2003), pp. 293–354. Prussia’s defeat is summarized by C. Telp, ‘The Prussian army in the Jena campaign’, in A. Forrest and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Bee and the Eagle (Basingstoke, 2009), pp.155–71.

13. Burgdorf, Weltbild, p.164.

14. G. Mraz, Österreich und das Reich, 1804–1806 (Vienna, 1993), pp.83–4. For an example of the integration of the former territories within a surviving principality, see P. Exner, ‘Die Eingliederung Frankens – oder: wie wird man württembergisch und badisch?’, ZWLG, 71 (2012), 383–448.

15. Landesarchiv Münster, A230 Rietberg Geheimer Rat Akten, Nr.1377, 14 May 1808.

16. L. Auer, ‘Die Verschleppung der Akten des Reichshofrats durch Napoleon’, in T. Olechowski et al. (eds.), Grundlagen der österreichischen Rechtskultur (Vienna, 2010), pp.1–13.

17. E.-O. Mader, Die letzten ‘Priester der Gerechtigkeit’. Die Auseinandersetzung der letzten Generation von Richtern des Reichskammergerichts mit der Auflösung des Heiligen Römischen Reiches Deutscher Nation (Berlin, 2005).

18. I. Scheurmann (ed.), Frieden durch Recht. Das Reichskammergericht von 1495 bis 1806 (Mainz, 1994), esp. p.342.

19. K. and A. Weller, Württembergische Geschichte im südwestdeutschen Raum (7th ed., Stuttgart, 1972), p.212; Baden und Württemberg im Zeitalter Napoleons (2 vols., issued by the Württembergisches Landesmuseum, Stuttgart, 1987). For general discussions of the reforms, see M. Broers, Europe under Napoleon, 1799–1815 (London, 1996), pp.103–41, 167–77, 202–8; M. Rowe, ‘Napoleon and the “modernisation” of Germany’, in P. G. Dwyer and A. Forrest (eds.), Napoleon and his Empire: Europe, 1804–1814 (Basingstoke, 2007), pp.202–40; A. Fahrmeir, ‘Centralisation versus particularism in the “Third Germany”’, in M. Rowe (ed.), Collaboration and Resistance in Napoleonic Europe: State-Formation in an Age of Upheaval, c.1800–1815 (Basingstoke, 2003), pp.107–20.

20. S. A. Eddie, Freedom’s Price: Serfdom, Subjection and Reform in Prussia, 1648–1848 (Oxford, 2013).

21. K. Görich, Friedrich Barbarossa (Munich, 2011), p.639.

22. B. Demel, ‘Der Deutsche Orden und seine Besitzungen im südwestdeutschen Sprachraum vom 13. bis 19. Jahrhundert’, ZWLG, 31 (1972), 16–73 at 68–72.

23. Menzel, ‘Franz Joseph von Albini’, pp.109–10; R. Wohlfeil, ‘Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des Rheinbundes, 1806–1813. Das Verhältnis Dalbergs zu Napoleon’, ZGO, 108 (1960), 85–108; G. Schmidt, ‘Der napoleonische Rheinbund – ein erneuertes Altes Reich?’, in V. Press (ed.), Alternativen zur Reichsverfassung in der frühen Neuzeit?(Munich, 1995), pp.227–46.

24. Walter, Zusammenbruch, pp.59–70. For the following see E. Weis, ‘Napoleon und der Rheinbund’, in A. v. Reden-Dohna (ed.), Deutschland und Italien im Zeitalter Napoleons (Wiesbaden, 1979), pp.57–80.

25. D. E. Barclay, Frederick William IV and the Prussian Monarchy, 1840–1861 (Oxford, 1995), p.188. See generally A. Zamoyski, Rites of Peace: The Fall of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna (London, 2007), pp. 239–50; Walter, Zusammenbruch, pp.104–8.

26. T. Riotte, Hannover in der britischen Politik (1792–1815) (Münster, 2005), pp.193–208; W. D. Gruner, ‘Österreich zwischen Altem Reich und Deutschem Bund (1789–1816)’, in W. Brauneder and L. Höbelt (eds.), Sacrum Imperium (Vienna, 1996), pp.319–60 at 326–40.

27. P. Burg, Die deutsche Trias in Idee und Wirklichkeit. Vom Alten Reich zum deutschen Zollverein (Stuttgart, 1989), pp.46–54.

28. F. Quarthal, ‘Österreichs Verankerung im Heiligen Römischen Reich deutscher Nation’, in R. G. Plaschka et al. (eds.), Was heißt Österreich? (Vienna, 1995), pp.109–34 at 126–7.

29. Angermeier, ‘Deutschland’, 42–60. For Austrian policy see V. Press, Altes Reich und Deutscher Bund. Kontinuität in der Diskontinuität (Munich, 1995).

30. M. Hughes, ‘Fiat justitia, pereat Germania? The imperial supreme jurisdiction and imperial reform in the later Holy Roman Empire’, in J. Breuilly (ed.), The State of Germany (Harlow, 1992), pp.29–46 at 44–5.

31. K. Härter, ‘Reichsrecht und Reichsverfassung in der Auflösungsphase des Heiligen Römischen Reichs deutscher Nation’, ZNRG, 28 (2006), 316–37.

32. H. Fuhrmann, ‘“Wer hat die Deutschen zu Richtern über die Völker bestellt?” Die Deutschen als Ärgernis im Mittelalter’, GWU, 46 (1995), 625–41.

33. E. Vermeil, Germany’s Three Reichs: Their History and Culture (London, 1944), p.49.

34. Ibid, pp.383–4. See also C. Duhamelle, ‘Das Alte Reich im toten Winkel der französischen Historiographie’, in M. Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum – irregulare corpus – Teutscher Reichs-Staat (Mainz, 2002), pp.207–19. Although he shares the common misconception of disjunction between 843 and 962, J.-F. Noël is a rare exception in offering a more positive assessment: Le Saint-Empire (Paris, 1976).

35. J. Pánek, ‘Bohemia and the Empire: Acceptance and rejection’, in R. J. W. Evans and P. H. Wilson (eds.), The Holy Roman Empire, 1495–1806 (Leiden, 2012), pp.121–41 esp.131–7; R. Krueger, Czech, German and Noble: Status and National Identity in Habsburg Bohemia (Oxford, 2009), pp.191–217.

36. T. C. W. Blanning, ‘The French Revolution and the modernization of Germany’, CEH, 22 (1989), 109–29 at 116–18.

37. Angermeier, ‘Deutschland’, 42, 51–2. See also J. Whaley, ‘Thinking about Germany, 1750–1815’, Publications of the English Goethe Society, 66 (1996), 53–72.

38. M. Umbach (ed.), German Federalism (Basingstoke, 2002); A. Green, Fatherlands: State-Building and Nationhood in Nineteenth-Century Germany (Cambridge, 2001); D. Langewiesche, ‘Föderative Nation, kulturelle Identität und politische Ordnung’, in G. Schmidt (ed.), Die deutsche Nation im frühneuzeitlichen Europa (Munich, 2010), pp.65–80.

39. A. Green, ‘The federal alternative? A new view of modern German history’, HJ, 46 (2003), 187–202.

40. W. Doyle (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Ancien Régime (Oxford, 2012).

41. K. H. Wegert, German Radicals Confront the Common People: Revolutionary Politics and Popular Politics, 1789–1849 (Mainz, 1992), esp. p.319; A. Green, ‘Political institutions and nationhood in Germany’, in L. Scales and O. Zimmer (eds.), Power and the Nation in European History (Cambridge, 2005), pp.315–32.

42. K. B. Murr, Ludwig der Bayer: Ein Kaiser für das Königreich? Zur öffentlichen Erinnerung an eine mittelalterliche Herrschergestalt im Bayern des 19. Jahrhunderts (Munich, 2008).

43. W. Burgdorf, ‘“Das Reich geht mich nichts an”. Goethes Götz von Berlichingen, das Reich und die Reichspublizistik’, in Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum, pp.27–52. See also idem, Weltbild, pp.266–7, 283–318.

44. Barclay, Frederick William IV, pp.31–2. See generally K. Herbers and H. Neuhaus, Das Heilige Römische Reich (Cologne, 2010), pp.298–302. Cologne Cathedral was completed in 1880.

45. L. L. Ping, Gustav Freitag and the Prussian Gospel: Novels, Liberalism and History (Bern, 2006); R. Southard, Droysen and the Prussian School of History (Lexington, KY, 1995); K. Cramer, The Thirty Years’ War and German Memory in the Nineteenth Century (Lincoln, NB, 2007).

46. Burgdorf, Weltbild, pp.262–8.

47. Ludwig’s son Otto ruled from 1832 until he was deposed by a military coup in 1862. Thereafter, Greece was ruled by monarchs from the Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg family until the ‘colonel’s coup’ of 1973.

48. M. Todd, The Early Germans (2nd ed., Oxford, 2004), pp.247–52; G. L. Mosse, The Nationalization of the Masses: Political Symbolism and Mass Movements in Germany from the Napoleonic Wars through the Third Reich (New York, 1975), pp.24–63.

49. The Habsburgs used a black double eagle surmounted by Rudolf II’s dynastic crown as their dynastic imperial symbol between 1804 and 1918.

50. Hanover, Holstein, Nassau, Frankfurt, Hessen-Kassel and Hessen-Homberg were annexed by Prussia, while Parma, Lucca, Naples-Sicily, Tuscany, Modena and the Papal States disappeared into Italy.

51. B. Jelavich, Modern Austria (Cambridge, 1987), pp.72–147; F. Fellner, ‘Reichsgeschichte und Reichsidee als Problem der österreichischen Historiographie’, in Brauneder and Höbelt (eds.), Sacrum Imperium, pp.361–74; M. Stickler, ‘Reichsvorstellungen in Preußen-Deutschland und der Habsburgermonarchie in der Bismarckzeit’, in F. Bosbach and H. Hiery (eds.), Imperium – Empire – Reich (Munich, 1999), pp.133–54. For the hereditary title see pp.162–3.

52. E. E. Stengel, Abhandlungen und Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des Kaisergedankens im Mittelalter (Cologne, 1965), pp.140–46; Stickler, ‘Reichsvorstellungen’, pp.144–54.

53. R. Staats, Die Reichskrone (2nd ed., Kiel, 2008), pp.36–40.

54. A converted Cunard paddle steamer, previously called Britannia: W. Hubatsch et al., Die erste deutsche Flotte, 1848–1853 (Herford, 1981), esp. p.54.

55. K. Görich, Die Staufer (2nd ed., Munich, 2008), p.14; F. Shaw, ‘Friedrich II as the “last emperor”’, GH, 19 (2001), 321–39.

56. The statue was damaged and removed in 1945, but renewed and put back in 1993, perhaps rather insensitively on 1 September, the date celebrated throughout the Second Empire as ‘Sedan Day’, commemorating the victory over France in 1870.

57. J. Rüger, The Great Naval Game: Britain and Germany in the Age of Empire (Cambridge, 2007), pp.154–9.

58. M. Derndarsky, ‘Zwischen “Idee” und “Wirklichkeit”. Das Alte Reich in der Sicht Heinrich von Srbiks’, in Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum, pp.189–205; P. R. Sweet, ‘The historical writing of Heinrich von Srbik’, History and Theory, 9 (1970), 37–58; F. Heer, The Holy Roman Empire (London, 1968).

59. M. Hughes, Nationalism and Society: Germany 1800–1945 (London, 1988); R. Chickering, ‘We Men who Feel most German’: A Cultural Study of the Pan-German League, 1886–1914 (London, 1984). For the persistence of multilayered attachments see A. Confino, The Nation as a Local Metaphor: Württemberg, Imperial Germany, and National Memory, 1871–1918 (Chapel Hill, NC, 1997).

60. Görich, Die Staufer, p.15.

61. B. Schneidmüller, ‘Konsens – Territorialisierung – Eigennutz. Vom Umgang mit spätmittelalterlicher Geschichte’, FMS, 39 (2005), 225–46 esp. 242–3; H. K. Schulze, Grundstrukturen der Verfassung im Mittelalter (3rd ed., 3 vols., Stuttgart, 1995–2000), I, pp.30–33; F. Graus, ‘Verfassungsgeschichte des Mittelalters’, HZ, 243 (1986), 529–89 at 551–9; P. N. Miller, ‘Nazis and Neo-Stoics: Otto Brunner and Gerhard Oestreich before and after the Second World War’, P&P, 176 (2002), 144–86.

62. H. Picker (ed.), Hitlers Tischgespräche im Führerhauptquartier (3rd ed., Stuttgart, 1977), p.463.

63. Herbers and Neuhaus, Das Heilige Römische Reich, p.301.

64. F.-L. Kroll, ‘Die Reichsidee im Nationalsozialismus’, in Bosbach and Hiery (eds.), Imperium, pp.179–96 at 187–90; M. Pape, ‘Der Karlskult an Wendepunkten der deutschen Geschichte’, HJb, 120 (2000), 138–81 at 163–6.

65. Staats, Reichskrone, p.35.

66. K. R. Ganzer, Das Reich als europäischen Ordnungsmacht (Hamburg, 1941); F. W. Foerster, Europe and the German Question (New York, 1940).

67. G. Wolnik, Mittelalter und NS-Propaganda (Münster, 2004), p.85.

68. Kroll, ‘Reichsidee’, pp.181–2.

69. M. Steinmetz, Deutschland, 1476–1648 (East Berlin, 1965), pp.184–211; A. Dorpalen, German History in Marxist Perspective (Detroit, MI, 1985), pp.76–89.

70. J. Burkhardt, ‘Europäischer Nachzügler oder institutioneller Vorreiter?’, in Schnettger (ed.), Imperium Romanum, pp.297–316 at 300–301; T. Nicklas, ‘Müssen wir das Alte Reich lieben?’, Archiv für Kulturgeschichte, 89 (2007), 447–74 at 453–4.

71. H. J. Berbig, ‘Der Krönungsritus im Alten Reich (1648–1806)’, ZBLG, 38 (1975), 639–700 at 688.

72. Recently, Lenz has denied that the clerical figure depicts Pope Martin: Badische Zeitung, 3 July 2010; Reutlinger General-Anzeiger, 6 July 2014.

73. Further discussions of this aspect in J. Whaley, ‘The old Reich in modern memory: Recent controversies concerning the “relevance” of early modern German history’, in C. Emden and D. Midgley (eds.), German Literature, History and the Nation (Oxford, 2004), pp.25–49; P. H. Wilson, ‘Still a monstrosity? Some reflections on early modern German statehood’, HJ, 49 (2006), 565–76; T. C. W. Blanning, ‘The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation past and present’, Historical Research, 85 (2012), 57–70.

74. A. Wieczorek et al. (eds.), Die Staufer und Italien. Drei Innovationsregionen im mittelalterlichen Europa (2 vols., Stuttgart, 2010). Further discussion in Schneidmüller, ‘Konsens’, 225–7.

75. E.g. H. Soly (ed.), Charles V, 1500–1558 (Antwerp, 1998).

76. Quoted in R. Morrissey, Charlemagne and France (Notre Dame, IN, 2003), p.300. For an example of this interpretation see F. Pesendorfer, Lothringen und seine Herzöge (Graz, 1994), p.31.

77. http://www.karlspreis.de (accessed 8 Oct. 2013). See B. Schneidmüller, ‘Sehnsucht nach Karl dem Großen’, GWU, 51 (2000), 284–301 at 284–8; Morrissey, Charlemagne and France, pp.272–4.

78. O. v. Habsburg, Idee Europa. Angebot der Freiheit (Munich, 1976), p.42. See also his Karl IV. Ein Europäischer Friedensfürst (Munich, 1978).

79. G. Schmidt, ‘Das frühneuzeitliche Reich – Sonderweg und Modell für Europa oder Staat der Deutschen Nation?’, in Schnettger (ed.), Imperium, pp.247–77; J. Whaley, ‘Federal habits: The Holy Roman Empire and the continuity of German federalism’, in Umbach (ed.), German Federalism, pp.15–41 esp. 28. Schmidt and Whaley are the foremost exponents of the view that the early modern Empire was the first German nation state.

80. Chiefly P. C. Hartmann, Das Heilige Römische Reich deutscher Nation in der Neuzeit, 1486–1806 (Stuttgart, 2005), p.28, Kulturgeschichte des Heiligen Römischen Reiches 1648 bis 1806 (Vienna, 2001), pp.5, 76, 448, ‘Bereits erprobt: Ein Mitteleuropa der Regionen’, Das Parlament, 49–50 (3 and 10 Dec. 1993), 21. Broadly similar arguments have been advanced for the medieval Empire by J. Schatz, Imperium, Pax et Iustitia. Das Reich (Berlin, 2000).

81. Hartmann, Kulturgeschichte, pp.21, 55. Habsburg, Idee Europa, p.37, also presents the Empire as superior to the nation state.

82. Post on http://www.german-foreign-policy.com (29 Aug. 2006).

83. Die Zeit, no.26 (2000); Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 31 May 2000, no.5.

84. W. Heun, ‘Das Alte Reich im Lichte der neueren Forschung’, in H. Schilling et al. (eds.), Altes Reich und neue Staaten 1495 bis 1806, II, Essays (Dresden, 2006), pp.13–15; Reinhard, ‘Frühmoderner Staat’, 342–3.

85. B. Simms, ‘The ghosts of Europe past’, The New York Times, 9 June 2013. Further discussion in P. H. Wilson, ‘The Immerwährende Reichstag in English and American Historiography’, in H. Rudolph (ed.), Reichsstadt, Reich, Europa. Neue Perspektiven auf dem Immerwährenden Reichstag zu Regensburg (1663–1806) (Regensburg, 2015), pp.107-24

86. The classic definition of the sovereign state was articulated around 1900 by Max Weber: H. H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills (eds.), From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (London, 1948), pp.78–80. Useful insight in J. J. Sheehan, ‘The problem of sovereignty in European history’, AHR, 111 (2006), 1–15.

87. H. Behr, ‘The European Union in the legacies of imperial rule? EU accession politics viewed from a historical comparative perspective’, European Journal of International Relations, 13 (2007), 239–62. For the following see S. Weichlein, ‘Europa und der Föderalismus’, HJb, 125 (2005), 133–52.

88. J. Zielonka, Europe as Empire: The Nature of the Enlarged European Union (Oxford, 2006); O. Wæver, ‘Imperial metaphors: Emerging European analogies to pre-nation-state imperial systems’, in O. Tunander et al. (eds.), Geopolitics in Post-Wall Europe (London, 1997), pp.59–93.

89. P. H. Wilson, ‘Das Heilige Römische Reich, die machtpolitisch schwache Mitte Europas – mehr Sicherheit oder ein Gefahr für den Frieden?’, in M. Lanzinner (ed.), Sicherheit in der Vormoderne und Gegenwart (Paderborn, 2013), pp.25–34.

90. E. O. Eriksen and J. E. Fossum (eds.), Democracy in the European Union: Integration through Deliberation? (London, 2000); Zielonka, Europe as Empire, pp.165–6, 185.

If you find an error please notify us in the comments. Thank you!
Previous
Page
Next
Page